Military Significant Others and Spouse Support - MilitarySOS.com
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: Military seeks death penalty for Afghan massacre

  1. Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    Tojai's Avatar
    Tojai is offline
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    St. Pete FL
    Posts
    30,026


    #1

    Military seeks death penalty for Afghan massacre

    Advertisements
    US soldier in court over Afghan massacre - Americas - Al Jazeera English

    Military prosecutors have said they will seek the death penalty for a US soldier accused of killing 16 Afghan villagers when he ventured out of his camp drunk earlier this year.

    Staff Sergeant Robert Bales, 39, had allegedly been drinking whiskey and watching a violent action movie with comrades before heading out of his base twice to massacre victims including women and children in two nearby villages.

    The shootings in Afghanistan's Kandahar province in March marked the worst case of civilian slaughter blamed on an individual US soldier since the Vietnam War and eroded already strained US-Afghan ties after more than a decade of conflict in the country.

    The lead prosecutor, Lieutenant-Colonel Jay Morse, said he was submitting a "capital referral" in the case, requesting that Bales be executed if convicted.

    The soldier's wife and lawyer have claimed that Bales, a veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, could not remember what he did on the night of March 11 in the Panjwayi district.

    But prosecutors refuted that at the start of a so-called Article 32 hearing, held to determine whether there is enough evidence to hold a full court martial over the killings.

    "He was lucid, he was coherent, he was responsive," said Morse at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state, adding that he admitted to the crimes, reportedly saying: "It's bad, really bad."

    Bales faces 16 counts of premeditated murder and six counts of attempted murder, as well as charges of assault and
    wrongfully possessing and using steroids and alcohol while deployed.

    The hearing is expected to last two weeks and include witness testimony in Afghanistan carried by live video, including villagers and Afghan soldiers.

    According to Morse, Bales had been drinking with two fellow soldiers before he left his base, Camp Belambay, and went to a village where he committed the first killings.

    Morse said Bales then returned to the camp and told one of his drinking buddies "I just shot up some people," before leaving again for a second village am killing more people. Morse called Bales' actions "deliberate, methodical."
    Thoughts?

    I've always been against the death penalty, and still am, but it's cases like this that make it really hard for me to grit my teeth and not just wish the worst for him. Blech, makes me sick to my stomach. But I do think justice should be served, and I don't think the death penalty is just.
  2. ...and carry a towel.
    Space Hedgehog's Avatar
    Space Hedgehog is offline
    ...and carry a towel.
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,979
    #2
    I am against the death penalty, I don't think it's just. I think the US should do away with it.

    That said, since it is the highest punishment possible within the US judicial system today, I think it's a good thing they're seeking it in this case. The massacre of 16 people should be taken as equally severe and damnable offence, regardless of the nationality of the perpetrator or the victims. It is the kind of crime to demand the maximum severity of the law, whatever that maximum might be.
  3. Senior Member
    alice04's Avatar
    alice04 is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,408
    #3
    it seems national attention to this story faded away quickly shortly after it happened, but i've still googled his name every few weeks or so wondering if anything more has come of it. i really wish we could know the full story... or hear him talk about his side of things. such conflicting things have been released about the incident. would a trial mean a possibiliy to hear him speak, or not? this case makes me so curious of what the truth is...
  4. Senior Member
    MS234755's Avatar
    MS234755 is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,493
    #4
    It makes me sad. I know he's not the only person to get the death penalty with a family (wife/kids/etc.), and that his familial status shouldn't impact his punishment. But how do you try to explain this to his kids? It's all just such an awful situation.
  5. Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    Tojai's Avatar
    Tojai is offline
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    St. Pete FL
    Posts
    30,026


    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by alice04 View Post
    it seems national attention to this story faded away quickly shortly after it happened, but i've still googled his name every few weeks or so wondering if anything more has come of it. i really wish we could know the full story... or hear him talk about his side of things. such conflicting things have been released about the incident. would a trial mean a possibiliy to hear him speak, or not? this case makes me so curious of what the truth is...
    The whole way the story has been handled confuses and really saddens me. It just seems the focus and priorities of so many of the stories I find are so out of whack.

    Apparently he cannot talk about his side of the story if he says he doesn't remember it though ... I suppose there is a possibility he could testify, I'm not sure how military trials work if the defendant can be compelled to testify or not though.
  6. MilitarySOS Jewel
    danik's Avatar
    danik is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    3,678
    #6
    I would be hesitant to support the death penalty for him seeing as he has a history of TBI. Maybe it wasn't a factor, but there still is the possibility that he shouldn't have been cleared on his medical/behavioral screenings.


    “It always seems impossible until it's done.”
    ― Nelson Mandela
  7. 1/2 hippie, 1/2 diva... all Jersey
    sweetvanity's Avatar
    sweetvanity is offline
    1/2 hippie, 1/2 diva... all Jersey
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    9,370
    #7
    I think they are making the right choice. I think they also need to do this with the Ft. Hood shooter.

    www.SnarkyFit.com
  8. MilitarySOS Jewel
    katinahat's Avatar
    katinahat is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    20,893

    #8
    It's a military tribunal, not a public trial, so we'll only hear what they release. Rightfully so in my opinion, since certain actions, locations, names, etc. could be sensitive information.

    I have issues with the death penalty. I'm not sure. I understand people being a drain on the system, so it being more efficient to kill them than sentence them to life in prison. But at the same time, I don't feel like it's my right to take away a moment of their time when in that moment they may discover Christ. That's my biggest issue with the death penalty-- what if during their life sentence they could have come to Christ and learned Him and been forgiven those sins? What if he could have gone to heaven instead of hell if he'd only been given the opportunity to find Him? I don't know that I have the right to rob him of that chance.
    ​​​

    “Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” -- Carl Sagan

  9. aka Milfon2Wheelz
    BraveLilToaster's Avatar
    BraveLilToaster is offline
    aka Milfon2Wheelz
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kings Bay Ga
    Posts
    10,109


    #9
    I'm curious, if he did get the death penalty, how does the military carry it out? I know certain states use electric chair others lethal injection, is there something outlining what the federal government has to do? Firing squad?
  10. Senior Member
    CDNTrish's Avatar
    CDNTrish is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    6,435
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by BraveLilToaster View Post
    I'm curious, if he did get the death penalty, how does the military carry it out? I know certain states use electric chair others lethal injection, is there something outlining what the federal government has to do? Firing squad?


    They still use the electric chair?

    I am against the death penalty. I would opt for life in prison without possibility of parole.
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •