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Thread: FYI: rattlesnakes

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    #1

    FYI: rattlesnakes

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    I know we have alot of people new to San Diego or will be over the next few months. So I thought I'd give you all a heads up that it is rattlesnake season here. Those of us on the outskirts of the city, near canyons, or heavily vegitated areas are at risk. Our school (which sits on the canyon off of Clairmont Mesa Blvd.) has actually sent home letters reminding families of the rattlesnake risk. They have had issues with them getting in the bushes around the school in years past. My friend, who lives in the Aero Ridge district of Murphy Canyon had to rush her dog in over the weekend after the dog was bit (in their back yard) by a rattlesnake. She is actually just a block from Miller school so be on the lookout!
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    #2
    they are NOT fun to mess with!!!!
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    Thank you!!!!!
    Beth, Mama to Emmalee (12), Evan (9), and Ella (4 on May 7) (I really REALLY need to update my picture!)
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    #4
    Rattlesnakes in California, Department of Fish and Game


    The dos and don’ts in snake country:
    First, know that rattlesnakes are not confined to rural areas. They have been found near urban areas, in river or lakeside parks, and at golf courses. Be aware that startled rattlesnakes may not rattle before striking defensively. There are several safety measures that can be taken to reduce the likelihood of startling a rattlesnake.
    • Never go barefoot or wear sandals when walking through wild areas. Wear hiking boots.
    • When hiking, stick to well-used trails and wear over-the-ankle boots and loose-fitting long pants. Avoid tall grass, weeds and heavy underbrush where snakes may hide during the day.
    • Do not step or put your hands where you cannot see, and avoid wandering around in the dark. Step ON logs and rocks, never over them, and be especially careful when climbing rocks or gathering firewood. Check out stumps or logs before sitting down, and shake out sleeping bags before use.
    • Never grab “sticks” or “branches” while swimming in lakes and rivers. Rattlesnakes can swim.
    • Be careful when stepping over the doorstep as well. Snakes like to crawl along the edge of buildings where they are protected on one side.
    • Never hike alone. Always have someone with you who can assist in an emergency.
    • Do not handle a freshly killed snake, it can still inject venom.
    • Teach children early to respect snakes and to leave them alone. Children are naturally curious and will pick up snakes.
    Is it a rattlesnake?
    Many a useful and non-threatening snake has suffered a quick death from a frantic human who has mistakenly identified a gopher snake, garter, racer or other as a rattlesnake. This usually happens when a snake assumes an instinctual defensive position used to bluff adversaries. A gopher snake has the added unfortunate trait of imitating a rattlesnake by flattening its head and body, vibrating its tail, hissing and actually striking if approached too closely.
    A rattlesnake is a heavy-bodied, blunt-tailed snake with one or more rattles on the tail. It has a triangular-shaped head, much broader at the back than at the front, and a distinct “neck” region. The rattlesnake also has openings between the nostrils and eyes, which is a heat-sensing pit. The eyes are hooded with elliptical pupils. Additional identifying characteristics include a series of dark and light bands near the tail, just before the rattles which are different from the markings on the rest of the body. Also note that rattles may not always be present, as they are often lost through breakage and are not always developed on the young.
    Keeping snakes out of the yard
    The best protection against rattlesnakes in the yard is a “rattlesnake proof” fence. It can be expensive and requires maintenance, however. The fence should either be solid or with mesh no larger than one-quarter inch. It should be at least three feet high with the bottom buried a few inches in the ground. Slanting your snake fence outward about a 30-degree angle will help. Vegetation should be kept away from the fence since the snake could crawl to the top of an adjacent tree or shrub. Discourage snakes by removing piles of boards or rocks around the home. Use caution when removing those piles - there may already be a snake there. Encouraging and protecting natural competitors like gopher snakes, kingsnakes and racers will reduce the rattlesnake population in the immediate area. And, kingsnakes actually kill and eat rattlesnakes.
    What to do in the event of a snake bite
    Though uncommon, rattlesnake bites do occur, so have a plan in place for responding to any situation. Carry a portable phone, hike with a companion who can assist in an emergency, and make sure that family or friends know where you are going and when you will be checking in.
    The first thing to do if bitten is to stay calm. Generally, the most serious effect of a rattlesnake bite to an adult is local tissue damage which needs to be treated. Children, because they are smaller, are in more danger if they are bitten.
    Get to a doctor as soon as possible, but stay calm. Frenetic, high-speed driving places the victim at greater risk of an accident and increased heart rate. If the doctor is more than 30 minutes away, keep the bite below the heart, and then try to get to the doctor as quickly as possible.
    The California Poison Control Center advises:
    • Stay calm
    • Wash the bite area gently with soap and water
    • Remove watches, rings, etc, which may constrict swelling
    • Immobilize the affected area
    • Transport safely to the nearest medical facility
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    #5
    We lived in San Diego for 3.5 years and I never saw a single one. My DD saw one, one time. That being said, we lived in Chesterton housing which is not near a canyon. This is not to discount OP because you do need to be on the lookout if you live in SD! I'm just saying it is not AS big a deal in the non-canyon areas. My DD attended the Murphy Canyon CDC and they would also, upon occasion catch some Tarantulas on the property. They do checks of the playground EVERY single time the kids go out, before they go out.



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    #6
    we have them buggers here.
    Have never seen one before. But then again I just saw a wild mouse for the first time this morning
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by froglove View Post
    Rattlesnakes in California, Department of Fish and Game


    The dos and don’ts in snake country:
    First, know that rattlesnakes are not confined to rural areas. They have been found near urban areas, in river or lakeside parks, and at golf courses. Be aware that startled rattlesnakes may not rattle before striking defensively. There are several safety measures that can be taken to reduce the likelihood of startling a rattlesnake.
    • Never go barefoot or wear sandals when walking through wild areas. Wear hiking boots.
    • When hiking, stick to well-used trails and wear over-the-ankle boots and loose-fitting long pants. Avoid tall grass, weeds and heavy underbrush where snakes may hide during the day.
    • Do not step or put your hands where you cannot see, and avoid wandering around in the dark. Step ON logs and rocks, never over them, and be especially careful when climbing rocks or gathering firewood. Check out stumps or logs before sitting down, and shake out sleeping bags before use.
    • Never grab “sticks” or “branches” while swimming in lakes and rivers. Rattlesnakes can swim.
    • Be careful when stepping over the doorstep as well. Snakes like to crawl along the edge of buildings where they are protected on one side.
    • Never hike alone. Always have someone with you who can assist in an emergency.
    • Do not handle a freshly killed snake, it can still inject venom.
    • Teach children early to respect snakes and to leave them alone. Children are naturally curious and will pick up snakes.
    Is it a rattlesnake?
    Many a useful and non-threatening snake has suffered a quick death from a frantic human who has mistakenly identified a gopher snake, garter, racer or other as a rattlesnake. This usually happens when a snake assumes an instinctual defensive position used to bluff adversaries. A gopher snake has the added unfortunate trait of imitating a rattlesnake by flattening its head and body, vibrating its tail, hissing and actually striking if approached too closely.
    A rattlesnake is a heavy-bodied, blunt-tailed snake with one or more rattles on the tail. It has a triangular-shaped head, much broader at the back than at the front, and a distinct “neck” region. The rattlesnake also has openings between the nostrils and eyes, which is a heat-sensing pit. The eyes are hooded with elliptical pupils. Additional identifying characteristics include a series of dark and light bands near the tail, just before the rattles which are different from the markings on the rest of the body. Also note that rattles may not always be present, as they are often lost through breakage and are not always developed on the young.
    Keeping snakes out of the yard
    The best protection against rattlesnakes in the yard is a “rattlesnake proof” fence. It can be expensive and requires maintenance, however. The fence should either be solid or with mesh no larger than one-quarter inch. It should be at least three feet high with the bottom buried a few inches in the ground. Slanting your snake fence outward about a 30-degree angle will help. Vegetation should be kept away from the fence since the snake could crawl to the top of an adjacent tree or shrub. Discourage snakes by removing piles of boards or rocks around the home. Use caution when removing those piles - there may already be a snake there. Encouraging and protecting natural competitors like gopher snakes, kingsnakes and racers will reduce the rattlesnake population in the immediate area. And, kingsnakes actually kill and eat rattlesnakes.
    What to do in the event of a snake bite
    Though uncommon, rattlesnake bites do occur, so have a plan in place for responding to any situation. Carry a portable phone, hike with a companion who can assist in an emergency, and make sure that family or friends know where you are going and when you will be checking in.
    The first thing to do if bitten is to stay calm. Generally, the most serious effect of a rattlesnake bite to an adult is local tissue damage which needs to be treated. Children, because they are smaller, are in more danger if they are bitten.
    Get to a doctor as soon as possible, but stay calm. Frenetic, high-speed driving places the victim at greater risk of an accident and increased heart rate. If the doctor is more than 30 minutes away, keep the bite below the heart, and then try to get to the doctor as quickly as possible.
    The California Poison Control Center advises:
    • Stay calm
    • Wash the bite area gently with soap and water
    • Remove watches, rings, etc, which may constrict swelling
    • Immobilize the affected area
    • Transport safely to the nearest medical facility
    Good info! I think you should have been the OP of the thread.
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by navywifeplus3 View Post
    Good info! I think you should have been the OP of the thread.

    I is from Cali... dealt with them OFTEN out hunting and shooting with my daddy. Even walked RIGHT by a sleeping one while camping... NOT FUN!
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    #9
    Is there that kind of snake in camp pendleton?
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    #10
    YEP. My dog was bit two years ago and almost died. 2500 vet bill!!!

    Keep your grass cut short and keep your eyes open
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