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    #1

    Gravy

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    I'm hosting my first thanksgiving dinner this year and I'm clueless as to how to make gravy without using store bought. Does anyone have any really simple recipes that they've tried and loved?
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    #2
    I learned from Brandi. That was kinda scary to write too.

    What I do is this....

    I melt butter in a pan. When it is nice and melted (don't let it Burn!!!), I add flour. Something like 2 Tablespoons of Butter to 2 Tablespoons of flour. Then you add 2 C. liquid and whisk it in. You can use the turkey drippings. I end up using chicken stock because my turkey is smoked and the drippings aren't that good. As you whisk in the liquid, you keep stirring it until it comes to a strong simmer. You keep it at that simmer for about 1 to 2 min. Then serve.

    Pretty easy. I've taken lots of learning from that now.

    BTW.....THANKS BRANDI FOR THIS ONE!!!!
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    #3
    I take the giblets and simmer them while the turkey is roasting. What you end up with is a really dark stock.

    In a skillet, I take some drippings from the turkey and heat them up (2-3 TBS), I add 2-3 TBS of flour and whisk it up. Let it turn a light light brown, then you know the flour taste is out. Then I add the hot stock and whisk it. Let it simmer until I get the right consistency. I add a TBS or tow of butter, it just adds a richness. Of course, salt and pepper to taste.
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    #4
    Not sure how "from scratch" you want it, but most turkeys these days come with a packet of gravy starter that you add your drippings and stock to make gravy. I've used it for a turkey breast and it was rather good.
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by BKat View Post
    I'm hosting my first thanksgiving dinner this year and I'm clueless as to how to make gravy without using store bought. Does anyone have any really simple recipes that they've tried and loved?
    Take the drippings and pour them into as narrow a container as you can, leaving the rest in the bottom of the roasting pan (or scrape all the crumbly bits into another pot). Let it sit for about 10-15 minutes so the fat rises to the top. Use a thin spoon and lift off as much of the fat as possible.

    Take make sure you have at least 1/2 cup of liquid; ass water if you need to. Mix in 2 tablespoons of flour (Wondra is best for this but it's not required) and stir/mash until all the lumps are gone. Pour this into the pan that has the remainder of the pan droppings, turn the heat to low-medium, and stir constantly until it's thickened to where you want it.

    If you have more than abou 3/4 cup of liquid, you'll need to mix in 3 tablespoons of flour instead of 2.
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by eelo View Post
    Take the drippings and pour them into as narrow a container as you can, leaving the rest in the bottom of the roasting pan (or scrape all the crumbly bits into another pot). Let it sit for about 10-15 minutes so the fat rises to the top. Use a thin spoon and lift off as much of the fat as possible.

    Take make sure you have at least 1/2 cup of liquid; ass water if you need to. Mix in 2 tablespoons of flour (Wondra is best for this but it's not required) and stir/mash until all the lumps are gone. Pour this into the pan that has the remainder of the pan droppings, turn the heat to low-medium, and stir constantly until it's thickened to where you want it.

    If you have more than abou 3/4 cup of liquid, you'll need to mix in 3 tablespoons of flour instead of 2.
    It must be late but that made me crack up, doesn’t sound like a very tasty ingredient for gravy but who am I to judge!
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by mpicky View Post
    I take the giblets and simmer them while the turkey is roasting. What you end up with is a really dark stock.

    In a skillet, I take some drippings from the turkey and heat them up (2-3 TBS), I add 2-3 TBS of flour and whisk it up. Let it turn a light light brown, then you know the flour taste is out. Then I add the hot stock and whisk it. Let it simmer until I get the right consistency. I add a TBS or tow of butter, it just adds a richness. Of course, salt and pepper to taste.
    This is almost exactly how I make mine, except I "fry" the giblets first in the pan I am making the gravy in before they make the "stock". We use the giblet stock for stuffing too. It adds an amazing flavor!
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Trey View Post
    This is almost exactly how I make mine, except I "fry" the giblets first in the pan I am making the gravy in before they make the "stock". We use the giblet stock for stuffing too. It adds an amazing flavor!
    Me too! I love using the stock for both the gravy and the stuffing. I also throw in some onion, celery and fresh garlic while it simmers.

    For thickening gravy I also use Cornstarch instead of flour but that's from years of cooking with my grannie and Gramps not being able to have flour. There's no clumping issues with cornstarch like you can get with flour.





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    #9
    Thanks you guys! I'm excited to try it out and I bought packets of gravy mix in case I fail It sounds easy enough though.

    Solstice, when you mix in the cornstarch instead of flour, do you use about 2 tablespoons also or less?
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    #10
    I put about a quarter cup of cornstarch in a coffee mug, and add cold water and stir it with a for until it's dissolved. Must use cold water, and use as little water as possible.

    I add a little water to the meat drippings, and then boil the meat drippings until it's rolling like crazy, the whisk in the cornstarch/water until it's thick. When I made roasts, I use pans that can go from the oven right to the stovetop. I don't make roasts or bake meat in glass pans.

    I prefer cornstarch because it doesn't leave an after taste like flour. You can get the after taste out by boiling the gravy an extra few minutes, but I can always tell the difference between gravy made with cornstarch and gravy made with flour.

    The only downside to using cornstarch for a thickener, is that is you taste directly from the pan, your saliva (even in small amounts) can break down the cornstarch and the left over gravy will begin to liquefy in the fridge.
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