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Thread: Lighting question

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    #1

    Screwy Lighting question

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    (I'm trying to think of how to word this without it sounding bad... bare with me)


    Today I was photographing an event (I'm still learning, so it wasn't a paid shoot, just a mutually beneficial opportunity). Outdoors, sunny day, lots of kids running around. The pictures of the light skinned kids look great. But the pictures of the dark skinned kids did not come out at all. I lost all the detail in their faces

    Is there something in particular I should try? I looked a little on google, but most of what I could find was lighting for a studio setting.

  2. I was the perfect mom, until I had kids.
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    #2
    Do you have a picture as an example of what you mean by losing the detail in their face?


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    #3
    I asked DH what his thoughts on this was. Since he has gone to school for this I let him type the response that is in quotation marks. Hope this helps out some And no one should take your post wrong. You are not posting anything mean or bad.

    "What you're seeing is how light works. Light skin tones reflect light and dark tones absorb the light. In order to gain a correct exposure for dark skin is to adjust the aperture or shutter to compensate. Basically you need to overexpose for darker tones to pull detail from the subject. When shooting a variety of different subjects under the same light with no controls to aid in exposures, using spot meter is your best bet. One method is to take exposure readings of highlight, shadow and a rough reading of the subject and average them. This will get you in the ball park. I tend to take readings off what I feel is most important in the frame and a middle tone under the same light. I then depending on skin tone typically over expose by a third of a stop. However, this measurement isn't standard each camera/light meter reads slightly different. Even if they're the same make & model. The sounds harder than it really is. The whole process is done in a couple seconds when you're used to it. The best way to master the technique is to experiment by doing until you're happy with the result. I quit before I make it sound worse than it really is."
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by *IGrow'EmXL* View Post
    Do you have a picture as an example of what you mean by losing the detail in their face?
    I hesitate to post pictures since they're all kids and I don't have full photo releases for them. But basically, other than the whites of their eyes and their teeth, their faces just look like a dark circle on top of their bodies. You can't see the contours of their nose and cheeks and stuff like that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Southern-queen View Post
    I asked DH what his thoughts on this was. Since he has gone to school for this I let him type the response that is in quotation marks. Hope this helps out some And no one should take your post wrong. You are not posting anything mean or bad.

    "What you're seeing is how light works. Light skin tones reflect light and dark tones absorb the light. In order to gain a correct exposure for dark skin is to adjust the aperture or shutter to compensate. Basically you need to overexpose for darker tones to pull detail from the subject. When shooting a variety of different subjects under the same light with no controls to aid in exposures, using spot meter is your best bet. One method is to take exposure readings of highlight, shadow and a rough reading of the subject and average them. This will get you in the ball park. I tend to take readings off what I feel is most important in the frame and a middle tone under the same light. I then depending on skin tone typically over expose by a third of a stop. However, this measurement isn't standard each camera/light meter reads slightly different. Even if they're the same make & model. The sounds harder than it really is. The whole process is done in a couple seconds when you're used to it. The best way to master the technique is to experiment by doing until you're happy with the result. I quit before I make it sound worse than it really is."
    Thanks I think that helps, I'll give it a try.

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