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Thread: Beginner Photography Tips

  1. simply_sweetx0
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    #1

    Question Beginner Photography Tips

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    I have a Canon EOS Rebel and I am still learning to use.

    I am trying to learn how to use it in the manual mode, does anyone have any tips or suggestions on how I can get better at taking pictures.

    I know one of my biggest problems is that I can be very shaky. I wonder if I could be nervous when I take photos.

    Thank you!
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    #2
    No particular advice. Just practice, practice, practice!!

    And then if it is because you are nervous, hopefully you will get more confident and it will go away.
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    #3
    I assume you're talking about a digital rebel? Just wondering because I'm still sporting two analog rebels

    Basically at this point, you need to play with aperture speed versus shutter speed. It's hard to give good advice without knowing your knowledge on the subject but basically the larger the aperture the slower your shutter speed can be and vice versa. Also you need to keep in mind your ISO. The higher the ISO the more sensitive to light (therefore aperture can be smaller), but the higher the ISO the more you sacrifice in quality. Ideally you want to have your ISO set low for the best quality. The key is to make sure that you're not letting in too much light or too little light.

    Also, if you're concerned with shaky hands, invest in a tripod or a monopod. You don't have to do anything really expensive, just something cheap to get you started. Keep in mind though, the larger the aperture and the faster the shutter speed, the less likely it is that you will have blurred pics because the camera will take the picture faster anyway.

    My advice, especially if you are on a digital camera, take tons of pictures. Get a really large memory card so that you can take lots of pictures without having to delete any until you're ready to pull them off of the card. Take pictures of different subjects; take pictures of movement, take still life shots, portrait types, etc. If you have it available where you live, try taking a beginning photography class. The key to taking the best pictures isn't just having a really good camera/equipment; you still have to understand what the ISO is, understanding depth of field, how to change your f-stop settings and shutter speeds, and what situations you should make those changes in.

    Also, do NOT go crazy buying equipment. Figure out what works best for YOU and what kind of pictures you like taking. Do you prefer natural light pics? Do you want to use the flash a lot instead? Camera lenses are extremely expensive (professional lenses can cost several thousand dollars), and you don't want to buy a lens if you wind up not using it, or if its unnecessary. For example, buying a telephoto lens but you only take photos of your family mostly, or buying a wide angle lens when you only do close up portrait shots.

    Good luck! I'm pretty jealous; I want a DSLR desperately because it's so hard to find places to develop film now, but I can't afford to buy one yet! Have fun
  4. simply_sweetx0
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by HisGirl2010 View Post
    No particular advice. Just practice, practice, practice!!

    And then if it is because you are nervous, hopefully you will get more confident and it will go away.
    I agree that I need a lot more practice. I need to be more relaxed when taking pictures. I hope to learn not to be anxious or nervous.

    Quote Originally Posted by meruhd View Post
    I assume you're talking about a digital rebel? Just wondering because I'm still sporting two analog rebels

    Basically at this point, you need to play with aperture speed versus shutter speed. It's hard to give good advice without knowing your knowledge on the subject but basically the larger the aperture the slower your shutter speed can be and vice versa. Also you need to keep in mind your ISO. The higher the ISO the more sensitive to light (therefore aperture can be smaller), but the higher the ISO the more you sacrifice in quality. Ideally you want to have your ISO set low for the best quality. The key is to make sure that you're not letting in too much light or too little light.

    Also, if you're concerned with shaky hands, invest in a tripod or a monopod. You don't have to do anything really expensive, just something cheap to get you started. Keep in mind though, the larger the aperture and the faster the shutter speed, the less likely it is that you will have blurred pics because the camera will take the picture faster anyway.

    My advice, especially if you are on a digital camera, take tons of pictures. Get a really large memory card so that you can take lots of pictures without having to delete any until you're ready to pull them off of the card. Take pictures of different subjects; take pictures of movement, take still life shots, portrait types, etc. If you have it available where you live, try taking a beginning photography class. The key to taking the best pictures isn't just having a really good camera/equipment; you still have to understand what the ISO is, understanding depth of field, how to change your f-stop settings and shutter speeds, and what situations you should make those changes in.

    Also, do NOT go crazy buying equipment. Figure out what works best for YOU and what kind of pictures you like taking. Do you prefer natural light pics? Do you want to use the flash a lot instead? Camera lenses are extremely expensive (professional lenses can cost several thousand dollars), and you don't want to buy a lens if you wind up not using it, or if its unnecessary. For example, buying a telephoto lens but you only take photos of your family mostly, or buying a wide angle lens when you only do close up portrait shots.

    Good luck! I'm pretty jealous; I want a DSLR desperately because it's so hard to find places to develop film now, but I can't afford to buy one yet! Have fun
    I will look into getting a monopod or tripod. I will look into taking a beginner photography class, I hope they are offered out here. When I take the pictures
    I become confused with aperture and shutter speed.

    Thank you for the advice!
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    #5
    Get the book understanding exposure and read your manual that came with the camera there are also tons of photography forums that you can join to get constructive criticism
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    #6
    I read this to understand how to use my manual setting. DSLR lessons from OBBC--copied for everyone. Hope that is ok... - Photographing Your Family - BabyCenter

    Also, like the pp said. Get the book. GREAT book.



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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by yaya03 View Post
    I have a Canon EOS Rebel and I am still learning to use.

    I am trying to learn how to use it in the manual mode, does anyone have any tips or suggestions on how I can get better at taking pictures.

    I know one of my biggest problems is that I can be very shaky. I wonder if I could be nervous when I take photos.

    Thank you!
    There are times when I am anxious or something when I am trying to take a pic, my "shaky hands" indicator lights up... I lean on a wall or pillar to give me more stability while I get the shot.

    I press my shoulder against the wall so that only one hand is holding the camera free, and the other is against the solid item. HTH
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    #8
    Check out this website. They have a forum and lots of good tutorials and learning challenges.

    http://www.digital-photography-school.com/

    Your shutter speed is a number like 6 or 1/25 or something like that. That means your shutter will stay open for one twenty fifth of a second OR 6 seconds. The longer the shutter stays open, the longer your exposure (i.e. the more light that reaches your sensor to make the picture). The faster the shutter the better for you especially if you shake. If you have a 6 second exposure then you can't move that camera even the slightest bit or you will have blur. (This is where your tripod is a must).

    Aperture is your f number. Depending on your lens it could be f2.0 up to anything like f16. This controls how much depth of field you have. By this I mean if you have an aperture of f2.8 and you take a photo of a person standing in front of you, the background behind him (providing your focus is on him) will be blurred. Contrast this, if your f is set at f12 and you take that same photo, you will have more detail standing out in your photo background.

    Make sense?

    Your camera also has a setting called ISO. This is similar to your film speed when you shoot with a film camera. If you are outside shooting you would have your ISO around 100. If you are shooting in lower light and you don't want to worry as much about leaving your shutter open longer (and therefore get blur) you can set your ISO higher ... to like 600 or so. The higher the ISO the more noise in your image. Noise is that grainy look you see in darker photos.

    Does some of this help?

    Also check out:

    http://www.dgrin.com/index.php





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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Solstice View Post
    Check out this website. They have a forum and lots of good tutorials and learning challenges.

    Digital Photography Tips: Digital Photography School

    Your shutter speed is a number like 6 or 1/25 or something like that. That means your shutter will stay open for one twenty fifth of a second OR 6 seconds. The longer the shutter stays open, the longer your exposure (i.e. the more light that reaches your sensor to make the picture). The faster the shutter the better for you especially if you shake. If you have a 6 second exposure then you can't move that camera even the slightest bit or you will have blur. (This is where your tripod is a must).

    Aperture is your f number. Depending on your lens it could be f2.0 up to anything like f16. This controls how much depth of field you have. By this I mean if you have an aperture of f2.8 and you take a photo of a person standing in front of you, the background behind him (providing your focus is on him) will be blurred. Contrast this, if your f is set at f12 and you take that same photo, you will have more detail standing out in your photo background.

    Make sense?

    Your camera also has a setting called ISO. This is similar to your film speed when you shoot with a film camera. If you are outside shooting you would have your ISO around 100. If you are shooting in lower light and you don't want to worry as much about leaving your shutter open longer (and therefore get blur) you can set your ISO higher ... to like 600 or so. The higher the ISO the more noise in your image. Noise is that grainy look you see in darker photos.

    Does some of this help?

    Also check out:

    Digital Grin Photography Forum - Powered by vBulletin
    I have started perusing over there and I definitely like the guides they have. Very in depth. Plus I like that you can get critiques and tips on specific photos.

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