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Thread: Question for Photographers both amateur and professional

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    #1

    Question for Photographers both amateur and professional

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    I got the camera that I have now on my 19th birthday (coming up on 5 years ago). It has pretty much crapped out on me. It is a cannon powershot SD400 - so a compact point and shoot.

    DH and I both love taking pictures and want something higher quality and that will last us. I love what a DSLR can do, but we both have NO formal training in photography. Are they simple enough to figure out? Is there a transition camera you would recommend? Maybe a level before DSLR? Would we need to take a class or learn from a photograper?

    Should we stick to a regular digital? Something like this? Canon - PowerShot SX30IS 14.0-Megapixel Digital Camera - Black - SX30IS Black

    I am so overwhelmed.

    Thanks in advance.
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    #2
    Quote Originally Posted by ArmyCupcake View Post
    [. . .]

    Are they simple enough to figure out?
    Entry level dSLRs are pretty simple to use and figure out. Reading the manual is important. It really depends on what you plan on doing with it.

    Is there a transition camera you would recommend?
    There are enthusiast-level point and shoot cameras, but I wouldn't go that route. It's better to just go with an entry level dSLR.

    Would we need to take a class or learn from a photograper?
    Not at all. Read your manual and familiarize yourself with working in manual mode (aperture, shutter speed, ISO, white balance, histogram, metering, exposure, composition, depth of field, etc.) It can be overwhelming at first, but there isn't anything you can't learn on your own. I'm self-taught. Most of the photographers I know are self-taught as well.

    You can't go wrong with Nikon or Canon. I'm a Nikon girl.
    Pax, Aeon
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    #3
    I got a nikon d40 to start out with and it's pretty simple
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    #4
    honestly, it depends on how into it you want to get. I had a Casio Exilim before and I loved it as a point-and-shoot because it took wonderful photos without me actually having to mess with it. I upgraded to a Canon T1i Rebel DSLR because I want to get more into it. They are not cheap though, you're looking at probably $600-800 for a decent camera, then the lenses are $100-thesky'sthelimit. So it all depends on what you want to do. I want to eventually have a wedding photography business, so I invested in a nice camera that I can learn on that has the potential to grow with me. I did take a manual photography course at the Arts&Crafts center on my base because I had no idea about aperture/f-stop, ISO, etc and I wanted to understand it more.
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Vespertina View Post
    Entry level dSLRs are pretty simple to use and figure out. Reading the manual is important. It really depends on what you plan on doing with it.



    There are enthusiast-level point and shoot cameras, but I wouldn't go that route. It's better to just go with an entry level dSLR.



    Not at all. Read your manual and familiarize yourself with working in manual mode (aperture, shutter speed, ISO, white balance, histogram, metering, exposure, composition, depth of field, etc.) It can be overwhelming at first, but there isn't anything you can't learn on your own. I'm self-taught. Most of the photographers I know are self-taught as well.

    You can't go wrong with Nikon or Canon. I'm a Nikon girl.
    Thanks. I just didn't want to spend all that money and not even be able to use it. At this point, we just want to use it to play around with and for family events and such. You made me feel A LOT better. How do I know if one is an entry level DSLR?

    Quote Originally Posted by airmanssweetie View Post
    I got a nikon d40 to start out with and it's pretty simple
    Off to google.
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    #6
    List of entry level dSLRs.
    Pax, Aeon

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