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Thread: train my dog!

  1. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    #1

    train my dog!

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    Hey all! So, I'm just looking for a little guidance, or to hear how you all have successfully trained yer puppies.

    So, Betty is trained partially...Well we went through two of the training classes at PetSmart when she was little. The first one was successful. The second coincided with my breaking up with my ex, it was just a shit time, so that was pretty much a fail...on my part, not Bettys.
    Anyway, so Betty does really well with the clicker training and she is really motivated by treats, and I have a good understanding of that. She is fully potty trained, she will sit, lay down, and paw on verbal and hand signal command. I know that this requires me to just be more consistent.

    What I'm looking for now is to work on her barking and basically for her to stop doing something on command. The barking is number 1 though. She howls at any little thing, TBH, I'm used to it, but it can be annoying when my friends or family are over. So anyone here have a barker? And how did you train them to stop barking on command?

    TIA for any help

    eek, sorry for the super large pic!
  2. we were all rooting for you
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    #2
    No help here cause I'm a cat lady but she's so cuteeeee
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    #3
    Someone once told me to train my dog to speak on command and then they will only bark on command. no, he continues to bark like normal. I can't say I have been too successful with training them to NOT bark on command. They are normally fairly quiet and only bark when they need something so I haven't really felt the need.

    I imagine the way you want to train "Quiet" is like you would train "Stay". Slowly build on the amount of time they are "quiet" , start with a few seconds, then release and reward, and build.

    A strong "Come" and "Drop It" can help with the stop doing something on command. My dog will be digging in the backyard, but I can tell him to "come" and he will stop what he is doing and come to me. "Drop it" is ever so important because my dog loves to eat small articles of clothing. Working on drop it can be challenging because they will do it for certain items (toys) but then not do it for the items they REALLY want. After I have a firm "drop it" with toys then I will work with the more interesting items like shoes, and small items of clothing

    They both know "Stop" which I never really activity trained, I just yelled at them when they were doing something bad. They know that means stop what you are doing.
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    #4
    These videos are great. Here is the first, but they all deal with different types of barking. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jp_l9C1yT1g

    We have used these videos and various similar strategies. For example, when we first moved into our new house Sherlock would go bark at the neighbor dog through the fence. We just started going out there with him, distracted him away from barking (even if you have to use a treat to get their attention), then we taught him what we'd rather he do instead. We started with asking him to sit and then he'd get a million treats while having him look at the neighbor dog. Then, (after days of previous) we'd lure him up to the fence so he then knew he could walk by the fence, but he was still focused on me and the treat so there was no barking. We eventually just spent a lot of time there and any time he wasn't barking he'd get a treat. Now, he completely ignores the other dog.

    It's mostly about teaching them what you'd rather them be doing. So, if she barks at the door when the doorbell rings, teach her that the doorbell means go to your bed and you get lots of treats. If she barks for attention, teach her that attention gets her nothing (remember, even saying "no" or any eye contact/talking is attention, even if it's negative), but when she sits, lies down, walks away, etc, is when she gets attention. You have to be quick because you have to catch the very first step to make it successful. For instance, if she's barking at you for attention, reward her the millisecond she looks away for gets distracted (perfect time for clicker). Then you build on that, eventually she'll be turning around and facing the other way to ask for attention, or sitting, or laying down (whatever you happen to decide to teach her).

    Hopefully that makes sense.
  5. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by KittenMittens View Post
    No help here cause I'm a cat lady but she's so cuteeeee
    daww, well thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Amanduh View Post
    Someone once told me to train my dog to speak on command and then they will only bark on command. no, he continues to bark like normal. I can't say I have been too successful with training them to NOT bark on command. They are normally fairly quiet and only bark when they need something so I haven't really felt the need.

    I imagine the way you want to train "Quiet" is like you would train "Stay". Slowly build on the amount of time they are "quiet" , start with a few seconds, then release and reward, and build.

    A strong "Come" and "Drop It" can help with the stop doing something on command. My dog will be digging in the backyard, but I can tell him to "come" and he will stop what he is doing and come to me. "Drop it" is ever so important because my dog loves to eat small articles of clothing. Working on drop it can be challenging because they will do it for certain items (toys) but then not do it for the items they REALLY want. After I have a firm "drop it" with toys then I will work with the more interesting items like shoes, and small items of clothing

    They both know "Stop" which I never really activity trained, I just yelled at them when they were doing something bad. They know that means stop what you are doing.
    Thanks, we'll definitely work on strengthening her "come" She will at times, but not always.

    Quote Originally Posted by BiggyBiggs View Post
    These videos are great. Here is the first, but they all deal with different types of barking. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jp_l9C1yT1g

    We have used these videos and various similar strategies. For example, when we first moved into our new house Sherlock would go bark at the neighbor dog through the fence. We just started going out there with him, distracted him away from barking (even if you have to use a treat to get their attention), then we taught him what we'd rather he do instead. We started with asking him to sit and then he'd get a million treats while having him look at the neighbor dog. Then, (after days of previous) we'd lure him up to the fence so he then knew he could walk by the fence, but he was still focused on me and the treat so there was no barking. We eventually just spent a lot of time there and any time he wasn't barking he'd get a treat. Now, he completely ignores the other dog.

    It's mostly about teaching them what you'd rather them be doing. So, if she barks at the door when the doorbell rings, teach her that the doorbell means go to your bed and you get lots of treats. If she barks for attention, teach her that attention gets her nothing (remember, even saying "no" or any eye contact/talking is attention, even if it's negative), but when she sits, lies down, walks away, etc, is when she gets attention. You have to be quick because you have to catch the very first step to make it successful. For instance, if she's barking at you for attention, reward her the millisecond she looks away for gets distracted (perfect time for clicker). Then you build on that, eventually she'll be turning around and facing the other way to ask for attention, or sitting, or laying down (whatever you happen to decide to teach her).

    Hopefully that makes sense.
    Thank you! Yes, that makes a lot of sense to me. So in one example, I live downstairs from my sister, we share the laundry room on my floor, which is separated by a wall and door. Whenever she goes into the laundry room Betty barks, even though she knows who it is and what's happening. So, in that case, should I click and treat her the second she takes a break from barking? And also, distract her by doing sit
  6. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    #6
    I know a family that taught their dogs to go pick up a toy and hold it. They would use that every time they wanted them to stop barking. It may be easier to replace the habit than get rid of it.

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  7. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Anthiea View Post
    I know a family that taught their dogs to go pick up a toy and hold it. They would use that every time they wanted them to stop barking. It may be easier to replace the habit than get rid of it.
    Yea, I guess that is what I would be doing with either sit or come. Thanks!
  8. In vino veritas
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    #8
    You have a doxy. There is no hope.
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.VinoVet View Post
    You have a doxy. There is no hope.


    Good luck court! Shes super cute!
    "She knew she loved him when 'home' went from being a place to being a person."
  10. One does not simply Ewok into Endor
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    #10
    I was gonna say, if you find out please let me know. Rose is the same way. She barks when she's excited.

    <3 Anthiea <3 KittenMittens <3
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