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Thread: Calling all dog gurus!

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    #1

    Calling all dog gurus!

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    I've learned so much from you guys re: dogs; hoping you can help me out in this situation. We rescued a deaf boxer (owner surrender). He's 2 years old and all puppy! He's 95 lbs. I have an 85 lb 2 year old girl as well. She likes to play but is taking his playing as aggression. So then she gets aggressive. They seem to do well playing while they're leashes are on and is not holding them. I want to teach him how to play nicely and take cues from my girl, but also want to teach my girl she he's not trying to hurt her. I have told my husband to walk him when he gets home to realease some of his energy so he's not so high strung with my girl. Didn't know if anyone had any experience with deaf dogs or ideas how to get them both to play properly.
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    #2
    Quote Originally Posted by popsmoke View Post
    I've learned so much from you guys re: dogs; hoping you can help me out in this situation. We rescued a deaf boxer (owner surrender). He's 2 years old and all puppy! He's 95 lbs. I have an 85 lb 2 year old girl as well. She likes to play but is taking his playing as aggression. So then she gets aggressive. They seem to do well playing while they're leashes are on and is not holding them. I want to teach him how to play nicely and take cues from my girl, but also want to teach my girl she he's not trying to hurt her. I have told my husband to walk him when he gets home to realease some of his energy so he's not so high strung with my girl. Didn't know if anyone had any experience with deaf dogs or ideas how to get them both to play properly.
    For a bit it's going to be dependent on supervision, the other dog doesn't know he's deaf so if she's giving off verbal cues to him and he misses it and it can cause challenges. Let me guess he's mostly white?

    Training with him will be key so you can figure out how to get his attention to correct his behavior. Boxers are a lot of energy. He may need some one on one time to wear him out before playing with her.
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    He's all white (so handsome) I never thought about him not knowing he's deaf! makes sense because she'll come up behind him and he jerks his head. I don't think his previous owners worked with him. Agree 100% he needs to play before she gets let out too. Thanks for your reply!!
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by popsmoke View Post
    He's all white (so handsome) I never thought about him not knowing he's deaf! makes sense because she'll come up behind him and he jerks his head. I don't think his previous owners worked with him. Agree 100% he needs to play before she gets let out too. Thanks for your reply!!
    Yep! I have seen a couple, one was actually blind and deaf. But it's called Lethal White it's bad breeding, for some reason the more a dog is bred for white, the greater potential for issues.
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    Hi! I actually have a deaf pit bull mix! A lot of people get scared of him because he is VERY vocal and can play very rough. I usually just interrupt the play session and let him know that what he was doing was not okay. Let him calm down a bit and then try again. If the playing continues to be rough stop it for that moment and try again later! I definitely suggest A LOT of exercise! Good luck! If you have any more questions please let me know
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    #6
    Im curious, did you say you have them both on leashes when playing? If so, then thats a reason why they're aggressive. When you hold them back from one another it causes tension and for the dog to act aggressively.
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    #7
    I think burning his energy out in other ways and doing short play sessions is a great way to address the issue. Unfortunately some dogs don't like the way other dogs play. I know my pup is high energy and likes to box and such (even though he's a husky) and not all dogs appreciate that kind of play. Hopefully they'll warm up to each other eventually. Good luck!
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    #8
    Definitely agree with the advice to do lots of exercise! Obedience training using hand signals and positive reinforcement can help get him to settle down and focus if he starts getting too hyper, too. That way you can help teach him the skills he needs to play well with people and dogs even though he cannot hear them. Here are a few links that might be useful to you now and in the future as well!

    Training Tips Deaf Dogs Rock

    Training Tips
    "Light dispels darkness. Wisdom dispels ignorance."
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    #9
    Can you train him not to go into a certain area, or an area within a room that is blocked off? It might help your other dog feel she has a place she can go where he isn't allowed, so that if he gets rough, she can leave and go to a place she knows she will be left alone.

    The biggest thing is going to be just tons of supervision for a while.
    Science always wins over bullshit. ~Dick Rutkowski

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