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Thread: Terrier differences and whether if really makes a difference r/t vicious dog chance

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    #1

    Terrier differences and whether if really makes a difference r/t vicious dog chance

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    Yesterday when I was talking to DB he told me that he had a surprise when he tried to get out of his car to go workout before going to work (0500) He opened the door and what he thought was a pit bull basically put her head on his crotch! She acted like she wanted petted, like she was greeting him or something. He said after his heart started beating again he read the tag as he was petting her, called the phone number and woke the owner up. The owner came to get the dog, but seemed to get a little offended when DB asked if she was a pit bull. He said that she was an American Staffordshire Terrier, and wouldn't hurt anybody. (DB never said that she would, he just asked what kind of dog she was) When DB told someone at the exercise room what had happened, another guy told him that he had seen the dog out before, in the evening, and that the dog growled and charged at him. He escaped by getting inside in time. What makes this ironic was just before he told me this, on the local news a 7 month old baby was killed by what the news initially reported as a pit bull, then they later corrected it and said it was an American Staffordshire Terrier. The owner said that the dog had always been non violent and couldn't understand why it did that. If you google them they look different.

    Does anybody have any experience with these breeds or knowledge about them r/t their chances of going off on someone? Or is it really something not particular to a breed, as a local pit bull owners group claims? They say they are being unfairly singled out by the media.
  2. my kitchen is for dancing
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    #2
    no offense but it is not the dog it is the owner and post like that kinda let my blood boil
    People need to stop blaming the wrong end of the leash.
    I have a Stafford Boxer mix and she is the best girl ever. I work with her, she knows her commands and is the best snuggle buddy in the world.
    Getting used to the new lifestyle far away from home and leaving my fear behind each day a little more.
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    Getting used to the new lifestyle far away from home and leaving my fear behind each day a little more.
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    #4
    I have a couple of opinions on this matter:

    1) "Pit Bull" is not an actual breed and is a sort of slang term and IMO, from the research I've done, Staffys can easily fall under that term.

    2). Dogs are not at fault, humans are. Some dogs are physically more damaging due to size, size of jaw, teeth, muscles, etc...but it comes down to humans being at fault. Many pit bulls are gentle, wonderful dogs. Many dogs (general) bite/hurt people. It is not something I would attribute to pittys (using that term as a general term for dogs like dogos, staffys, etc...).

    3). I have seen a "pit bull" mix clamp down another dog, and it was terrifying because he locked on and was not letting up. Some people carry "break sticks" specifically in case their dog or a dog they run into clamps down like that and refuses to let go. You basically use the stick to pry the jaw open. I have heard that pittys in particular can be prone to "lock jaw" but I do not know that to be fact, I haven't studied dog breeding/genetics and behavior in depth. The dog I saw do it didn't react to full punches to the gut, and only released when water was poured directly up it's nose. After it released, it was wagging it's tail acting like nothing had happened. It was scary. The dog had a shady back ground, and I think may have been trained to do that or something like it.
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    #5
    As a veterinarian, I am much more afraid of chihuahuas, weiner dogs, yorkies, german shepherds and bichons than I am of 'pit bulls' (and pit bull isnt actually a breed). Pibbles generally end up in the news because when they bite, they do more damage than a toy poodle, but more people are bit by small breed dogs than pit bulls, its just small breed dogs dont do enough damage to warrent a doctor/hospital visit, and if they do, they arent always reported.
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    The guy probably jumped at saying he's an American Staffordshire because so many people have such a negative opinion of "Pit Bulls". We have a Staffy / Boxer mix and he's fairly hyper because he has boxer in him but he is super sweet and cuddles like he thinks he's 10lbs. It's all the owners and breed discrimination really gets to me. I'm way more afraid if I come across a chihuahua (not discriminating I've just had a lot of bad experiences with them ) than a pit looking dog. My neighbors have a full staffy and he occasionally gets out but he just comes and chills in my garage. Wont even greet people going by because he's to lazy .
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    #7
    I had a "pit bull" for over seven years. Bubba was the most gentle, kind animal that I have ever encountered in my life. He recently passed away, due to cancer, but he never bit anyone and never showed any signs of aggression toward anyone. He loved people, other animals, and absolutely adored children. He loved to let small children ride on his back. He once tried to nurse a baby squirrel that fell out of its nest back to health (unfortunately, the baby died).

    My mother rescued him when he was a starving puppy, whose owners could "no longer care for him". Unfortunately, there are a lot of myths that have been associated with the pit bull, such as "lock jaw". Don't believe me? Read this. There is a lot of stigma that comes with these beautiful dogs, but no one ever cares to look at the owners and see how they treat their animal. Any animal that is trained to be aggressive or neglected can be aggressive.

    Throughout my life (not all at the same time haha), I've had: two pit bulls, a chihuahua, two rat terriers, a rottweiler/dingo mix, and a miniature pinscher. Only three of those dogs have bitten people. Wanna know which ones? The rat terriers and the chihuahua.
  8. Pour a little salt, we were never here
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by bars_and_bodegas View Post
    I had a "pit bull" for over seven years. Bubba was the most gentle, kind animal that I have ever encountered in my life. He recently passed away, due to cancer, but he never bit anyone and never showed any signs of aggression toward anyone. He loved people, other animals, and absolutely adored children. He loved to let small children ride on his back. He once tried to nurse a baby squirrel that fell out of its nest back to health (unfortunately, the baby died).

    My mother rescued him when he was a starving puppy, whose owners could "no longer care for him". Unfortunately, there are a lot of myths that have been associated with the pit bull, such as "lock jaw". Don't believe me? Read this. There is a lot of stigma that comes with these beautiful dogs, but no one ever cares to look at the owners and see how they treat their animal. Any animal that is trained to be aggressive or neglected can be aggressive.

    Throughout my life (not all at the same time haha), I've had: two pit bulls, a chihuahua, two rat terriers, a rottweiler/dingo mix, and a miniature pinscher. Only three of those dogs have bitten people. Wanna know which ones? The rat terriers and the chihuahua.
    I don't know if you saw my above comment, but I just read the article you linked, and I'm not sure what it means. I never thought of the term of "lock jaw" meaning it's literally locked, but rather that it's something the dog does and as a human you can't always get it to release because the dog is choosing not to "unlock" due to it's perception of the situation. So I don't really get how it's a "myth". It's an observed thing that dogs (not just pits) do.

    Also, I've never heard anyone else say they have a dingo. I'm 99% convinced my second shelter "mutt" is actually a Carolina dog/American dingo
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    #10
    They report about 'pit bull' breeds because no one wants to blame a sweet-looking Golden Retriever even though Goldies register more bites than most breeds. My DH's family's pit is more cuddly and loving than my own dog who is more stand-offish. And they have the biggest smiles. It's the crime of the humans surrounding the breed that brings all the trouble.
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