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Thread: Does this dog look too skinny?

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    #1

    Does this dog look too skinny?

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    Does she look too skinny? I feel like the pictures don't really show how skinny she is. I feel like she should be removed from her current home.

    Sorry for the huge pics, I'm on my phone.

    ETA

    Last edited by Punky77; 10-26-2013 at 10:16 AM.
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    #2
    She does look skinny, but could she have a digestive problem or GI issue that leads to her being underweight? Or is it simply that she isn't being fed enough?
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    #3
    I don't know it seems close but there might be more to the story. Her coat looks shiny from the first picture so . Hopefully someone more knowledgeable pops on.
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by katinahat View Post
    She does look skinny, but could she have a digestive problem or GI issue that leads to her being underweight? Or is it simply that she isn't being fed enough?
    I agree, and if I didn't have a similar issue with one of my dogs then I probably wouldn't have that mindset. Thing is, that YES, that dog is too skinny. But the most important question is why. I have two dogs, one is a healthy weight and the other is chronically underweight. It's been a struggle since day one. So that could be the situation here, or it might not be.

    So... how long have they had the dog? Did they adopt it recently/find it as a stray (and therefore are working on putting on weight)? How old is the dog (looks like a puppy)? Did it recently have surgery? as well as what Kat inquired. I would straight up ask, but more in a casual observation. "Oh wow, she's such a skinny little thing!" and see what they say. I'd be perfectly comfortable saying that to someone, and I don't like confrontation. If i'm out and about i'd actually welcome someone making a comment about my one skinnier dog so I could clarify to them her issues, instead of them wondering. If there is a problem they should be happy to share it with you, if not then there might be something up.
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    #5
    The pictures aren't showing for me. That said, weight condition is something that is hard to judge by pictures except in cases of extreme under/overweight - because you can take a picture of the same animal on the same day from a very slightly different angle or even just in different lighting and get two very different appearances of condition. Seeing the animal "live" is key. As you have said yourself, you don't feel the pictures reflect her true condition. Also, a lot of the evaluation is based on "feel" and overall condition not just looking thin. Also, as pointed out, knowing the whole story is key in the determination of whether a dogs current condition is because of neglect by the current owner.
    I will also say that most people have a skewed idea of "healthy" weight/condition for animals - in fact, what most people consider "a little skinny" is actually a healthy body condition and what most people feel is healthy is slightly overweight, which is why there is such an issue of obese pets. Even my own husband has that mindset - he is constantly on me about Z being "skinny" (she is at ideal condition) and the fact that I have Jethro on weight control (he gets overweight VERY easily and with his arthritis it's even MORE important that he not carry extra weight). His idea of healthy is actually unhealthily overweight for them. Again, I can't see the pictures, so I am NOT saying that the dog in question falls into this - but I think it is important to understand body scoring, the animals history, etc before making judgement.
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by katinahat View Post
    She does look skinny, but could she have a digestive problem or GI issue that leads to her being underweight? Or is it simply that she isn't being fed enough?
    See that's what I'm not sure about. The person she belongs to I really hate to think would not feed her, but she's the only dog out of 3 that lives outside so I'm wondering if she's kind of forgotten some times. I went to feed her last night and she acted like she hadn't eaten in forever, but I've also seen dogs do that when they are fed every day. It was in the 20s last night and all she had was a muddy towel in her house I feel bad for her.
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by alice04 View Post
    I agree, and if I didn't have a similar issue with one of my dogs then I probably wouldn't have that mindset. Thing is, that YES, that dog is too skinny. But the most important question is why. I have two dogs, one is a healthy weight and the other is chronically underweight. It's been a struggle since day one. So that could be the situation here, or it might not be.

    So... how long have they had the dog? Did they adopt it recently/find it as a stray (and therefore are working on putting on weight)? How old is the dog (looks like a puppy)? Did it recently have surgery? as well as what Kat inquired. I would straight up ask, but more in a casual observation. "Oh wow, she's such a skinny little thing!" and see what they say. I'd be perfectly comfortable saying that to someone, and I don't like confrontation. If i'm out and about i'd actually welcome someone making a comment about my one skinnier dog so I could clarify to them her issues, instead of them wondering. If there is a problem they should be happy to share it with you, if not then there might be something up.
    They've had her for years, it's just really been an issue in the past 9 months. She hasn't had surgery or anything. I've talked to one of the owners and she said the vet said she was fine so idk. I just know the owners really well so I'm not entirely convinced that's the case.
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by ZivaD View Post
    The pictures aren't showing for me. That said, weight condition is something that is hard to judge by pictures except in cases of extreme under/overweight - because you can take a picture of the same animal on the same day from a very slightly different angle or even just in different lighting and get two very different appearances of condition. Seeing the animal "live" is key. As you have said yourself, you don't feel the pictures reflect her true condition. Also, a lot of the evaluation is based on "feel" and overall condition not just looking thin. Also, as pointed out, knowing the whole story is key in the determination of whether a dogs current condition is because of neglect by the current owner.
    I will also say that most people have a skewed idea of "healthy" weight/condition for animals - in fact, what most people consider "a little skinny" is actually a healthy body condition and what most people feel is healthy is slightly overweight, which is why there is such an issue of obese pets. Even my own husband has that mindset - he is constantly on me about Z being "skinny" (she is at ideal condition) and the fact that I have Jethro on weight control (he gets overweight VERY easily and with his arthritis it's even MORE important that he not carry extra weight). His idea of healthy is actually unhealthily overweight for them. Again, I can't see the pictures, so I am NOT saying that the dog in question falls into this - but I think it is important to understand body scoring, the animals history, etc before making judgement.
    I do think she's naturally on the skinnier side I guess, but her ribs and hip bones are sticking out. Last time I took care of her it was just her ribs so the hips are a new development.
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    #9
    I think if she's actually losing weight, it's an issue.

    My dog was skinny for a long time until he got fixed and gained an appetite, but the vet wasn't worried about it because he was just very active and still growing. If the dog is more than a few years old and she's losing weight, I'd be concerned about her being that skinny if she was my pet or something.
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    #10
    I definitely think so. And that's really sad to me about her living conditions.
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