Military Significant Others and Spouse Support - MilitarySOS.com
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Breeders who Spay/Neuter?

  1. Senior Member
    CPANavyWife's Avatar
    CPANavyWife is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,476
    #1

    Breeders who Spay/Neuter?

    Advertisements
    I am still in my quest to become a reputable breeder (currently showing my neutered cat in premiership)

    Anyhow, one of the things I am thinking about is deciding whether to spay/neuter prior to letting a new family adopt any kittens. I can see the pros and cons of both sides, this topic is very controversial just among breeders. But was wondering what others may prefer if they were going to a breeder.

    For my breed, it is standard practice reputable breeders don't release the kittens until 4 months for numerous reasons. So if I early spayed/neutered the kitten would be around 4 months old. The general practice among other breeders I know is to spay/neuter any pets by six months.

    Anyhow, I'm just interested in hearing other people's thoughts. I'm still very far from actually becoming a breeder but I'm doing a lot of research and trying to think about everything before I get into it.
    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing what others say you cannot do!
  2. Banned
    gunsgirl's Avatar
    gunsgirl is offline
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    lost
    Posts
    17,275
    #2
    I have a Bengal- as an owner it is my choice whether to get my animal fixed or not-
    I would not spend 1,000 dollars on a exotic that was already fixed.

    ( BTW we do neuter/spay all our cats, however I also declaw all their front claws at the same time of the neuter to limit the trauma of surgery)

    I also would not buy a kitten that was more than 10 weeks old ( personal preference and adaptability issues with having kids and other pets in the home).

    what kind of cats are you looking to breed?
  3. I'm sorry for the things I said when I was hungry.
    Whitla's Avatar
    Whitla is offline
    I'm sorry for the things I said when I was hungry.
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    25,558
    Blog Entries
    2
    #3
    I think it should be up to the person taking the animal. So no. I wouldn't. They might want to breed one of the kittens.




  4. Dancing Backwards in High Heels
    HisJuliet's Avatar
    HisJuliet is offline
    Dancing Backwards in High Heels
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Together Again!
    Posts
    9,081
    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Whitla View Post
    I think it should be up to the person taking the animal. So no. I wouldn't. They might want to breed one of the kittens.


    I think as a breeder you could discuss the importance of spaying/neutering and recommend a vet, but I wouldn't go and fix the animal prior to sale.
  5. aka Milfon2Wheelz
    BraveLilToaster's Avatar
    BraveLilToaster is offline
    aka Milfon2Wheelz
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kings Bay Ga
    Posts
    10,109


    #5
    I think fixing them before selling is incredibly responsible. Kudos to you for being a responsible owner and helping curb the overpopulation issue.
  6. scotlandgrl53
    eelizah's Avatar
    eelizah is offline
    scotlandgrl53
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Fort Polk
    Posts
    4,258
    Blog Entries
    1
    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by HisJuliet View Post

    I think as a breeder you could discuss the importance of spaying/neutering and recommend a vet, but I wouldn't go and fix the animal prior to sale.
    with this
  7. Senior Member
    TriggerHappy's Avatar
    TriggerHappy is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    1,570
    #7
    I feel the breeder should make that decision.

    If someone doesn't like how a certain breeder handles their litter, then I would suggest that person to find a different breeder.
    Generally you don't have to buy from that person, plus I would assume that person would ask if they dock/crop/neuter/spay their litter before purchase via email or phone.
  8. Senior Member
    Amanduh's Avatar
    Amanduh is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2,787
    #8
    On the fence. I was involved in breeding dogs (for show) for several years. If they had the HINT of being a show prospect or an animal that we would want to breed in the future we would insist that they sign a contract stating they wouldn't fix the dog for a few years (normally 3-5), wouldn't breed the dog and any breedings would have to go through us. (the contract also talked about what would happen if they couldn't keep the animal and so forth.) It was always our practice to contact the people regularly, I mean I knew most of the dogs that we placed...so I would know if someone was being shady. I was also very picky with my buyers so I had to feel comfortable that they understood responsible pet ownership first and foremost. I wasn't afraid to not sell to someone because they seemed like the kind of people that just wanted an animal to breed.

    I am all about responsible pet ownership, but as a breeder breeding for show, I would HATE if I sold a lanky little puppy and then he matured into a gorgeous dog and he was fixed. I

    But, this is all in the dog show world, I am not sure how cats/dogs differ in that aspect.
  9. Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Phoenixx.'s Avatar
    Phoenixx. is offline
    Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    2,073

    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by TriggerHappy View Post
    I feel the breeder should make that decision.

    If someone doesn't like how a certain breeder handles their litter, then I would suggest that person to find a different breeder.
    Generally you don't have to buy from that person, plus I would assume that person would ask if they dock/crop/neuter/spay their litter before purchase via email or phone.


    I also agree with Brave that kudos to you for helping to curb overpopulation. While there are those out there that get into breeding for the correct reasons (such as yourself) there are others out there who will buy a purebred animal and think that they can just breed it with any other purebred animal and make a quick income. There are people out there who do it for the wrong reasons, and its breeders like you out there who help stop that.

    There is an option, if you get enough interest in folks who want a kitten who is intact, for breeding purposes, that you may be able to put them on a waitlist and have a litter down the road that they can pick from that is intact. That makes them wait and really think about the decision to keep an intact cat, and also gives you a chance to take care of their needs in one litter. It also gives you time to decide as a breeder if you feel those people are responsible in their decision to keep an intact cat.



  10. Senior Member
    CPANavyWife's Avatar
    CPANavyWife is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,476
    #10
    Thanks for everyone's feedback. I truly appreciate the insight from those on the other aspect.

    I already know that many of my practices and how I choose to operate as a breeder would deter many people. Although many aspects are standard for the breed and not many other reputable breeders for this specific breed deter from those practices, the average pet adopter probably won't understand.

    I would never sell a pet quality kitten without a spay/neuter contract. That is a given. Just on the fence on WHEN to do it.

    I know the breed standard and have studied it. It's not an easy standard to obtain and many judges say it is extremely difficult to get show quality (but when you do, you don't neuter them... You either keep for your own lines or sell to another breeder or exhibitionist who will show your cat for you) Pet kittens are sold as pets for a reason, and they shouldn't be used for breeding. Additionally, there are blood types to think about. I plan to do DNA testing on my cats because if the blood types are incompatible between mom and dad, I could have a whole litter die. The average person doesn't think about that aspect of it. I know I didn't when I first started researching everything.

    That's just on the spay/neuter aspect. There are others, like declawing, a certain vaccine, and not adopting the kitten before 16 weeks, that I know would deter many but those are pretty standard among breeders. Getting into this breed is hard. Just to potentially become a breeder, you usually have to show the neutered cat class for awhile first to show your dedication to the breed. These cats are close to perfect, but not quite top show where you wouldn't want to neuter.

    Sure there are the exceptions, but usually not the norm.

    I always pause when I hear people who breed for money. I had an employee who bred Toygers and DH knows someone who breeds Egyptian Maus. And they talk about finally making money. The way I figure it, even when I reach the capacity I plan to have... I'll have 9 kitten a year max. At $750 or so a kitten, that doesn't cover the show fees, vet bills, feeding, cat litter, etc. To show one cat usually costs a couple hundred in expenses, so I don't know about others... But for me, IF I made any money, I'd plan to put all of it back in my cats.

    That said, kittens tear stuff up. I've already had to replace a few hundred dollars worth of electronics because the newest one likes wires... So I've upgraded a lot of things to wireless. Plus my kids have had a lot of chewed up homework, because they forgot and left papers in the coffee table. Our other cat used to chew on my expensive Victorias Secret bras when he was a kitten. And I knew of another that you'd have to hide bread bags cause he'd eat threw the bag. Kittens can be pests.

    I think my problem would probably be that I'd be very picky. But after all I've been through with my cats, and also hearing the horror stories, I figure if a prospective buyer doesn't understand that... They don't have to adopt from me. When I adopted our pet quality cat, I was also investing in a resource for years to come. So in some way, if a person adopts from me... I'd hope they realize that I'd be a resource for them if at any time there is a problem with the cat in the future.

    Anyhow... I'll stop there. Can you tell I'm just a little bit passionate about this?
    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing what others say you cannot do!
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •