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Thread: Training Questions

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    #1

    Training Questions

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    For the most part Kilo has been doing really well with his training! He already (usually) knows what "down" means and almost always waits for me to walk him to go potty. The only things we're having some trouble with is his chewing and crying in his crate.

    So obviously he's a puppy and is teething and we get that. He tries to chew EVERYTHING. Whenever I see him chew on something he's not supposed to, I say "no", give him a bop on the nose, and give him one of his chew toys. The only thing is that he refuses to let go of anything. He doesn't seem to understand what "no" means. How can we get him to understand that?

    Then there's the crying in his crate. Since I'm home all the time, he's only in his crate when we go to bed. We had it in our room for a while which I'm pretty sure was a mistake He would cry and then we'd give him attention (not positive, but telling him "no") so he'd keep crying. We put him in the living room last night and that definitely seemed to help a lot. We go to bed around 10:30-11 and he wakes up around 4 in the morning crying to go potty. I get up, walk him, and put him back in, and then it's about 10 minutes of crying before he falls asleep again. My only concern with that is that we're in an apartment complex and I feel really shitty knowing that our neighbors can probably hear him. What I'm thinking of doing is setting an alarm for 4 in the morning to bring him out and slowly start increasing the time by fifteen minutes so eventually he can sleep through the night without having to go out. Would that work? I don't want to have to wake up every night we need our sleep!

    I also start school next week so I'll be gone about 4 hours during the day. Would it be better to keep him in his crate or set him up in the kitchen on the tile?

    Any tips/advice would be awesome
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    We had the same thing when crate training our dog, but we never spoke to or looked at him when he started crying, I would sit in front of the crate so he knew I was there, and i would slowly move away until he stopped crying and fell asleep. I also put him in his crate during naps too, so he learned that was his safe place The waking up to potty thing was just something he had to outgrow.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwickham View Post
    We had the same thing when crate training our dog, but we never spoke to or looked at him when he started crying, I would sit in front of the crate so he knew I was there, and i would slowly move away until he stopped crying and fell asleep. I also put him in his crate during naps too, so he learned that was his safe place The waking up to potty thing was just something he had to outgrow.
    Thanks!
    Usually I let him sleep in my lap when he takes naps (I know I know, I need to stop that before he gets too big ) but today I had him nap in the crate. It worked out pretty well!
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    Somebody will probably come in and say not to do this, but when Finn was a puppy and he cried in his crate I would go lay in front of it on the floor and put my fingers in with him until he fell asleep and then I'd leave. I think the important part is to not let him out.

    I'd also suggest putting him in his crate more during the day. When crate training they're supposed to be in the crate more often than not, I'm pretty sure. Like don't leave him in there all day or anything obviously but maybe if you put him in there a couple times a day (while you're in the shower or making food or cleaning idk) hell get used to it more easily so he won't whine all night.
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    #5
    Rather than using "no" - if you want/need him to release something from his mouth you would be better off teaching a specific cue/command for that (ie "drop" or "give"). I, also, would eliminate the bop to the nose. When you want to take something from the dog, the last thing you want to do is grab the item and attempt to pull it, as this will initiate a clamp/tug reflex in them (especially a puppy who is in play mind). If you must grab/hold the item putting a slight "forward" (towards the dog/mouth) pressure is more likely to trigger a loosening of the grip - at which time you can take possession.
    You can start by having the puppy take one thing in their mouth and then ask them to drop/give it and offer something even more desirable (ie food/treat or favorite toy)- making the puppy want to spit out object A to get object B (this is another reason using replacement training for appropriate chew items works). This keeps the dog from thinking of it as "losing" this thing in my mouth and teaches them to associate putting that thing out of their mouth with getting something even better IN their mouth. Start by working with items it is okay for the pupy to have and then, once he has the idea down, you can start applying it in other situations. In the meantime, prevention really is the name of the game. Eliminating the access to non-chew items is going to be a large part of the battle.
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    Find a noise/motion that he understands rather than saying "no." I snap at Lexi and say "aaaaaanck" (I have no idea how to spell/type out the noise I make. ). I guess it's similar to a buzzer sound.

    What about a lightweight sheet/blanket over the crate? I've never crate trained my dogs, so I'm not much help with that one.
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    I agree with dolphinm04 with covering the crate.

    Summer would cry obnoxiously when she was a pup, and we (well I) placed a sheet, or some kind of cover over the gate. Found the only reason why she would cry was because she knew we were there (and I suppose wanted to play). Us being out of sight also made us out of mind ^^.

    And about the posession over treats/toys/items, if its on the ground and the pet refuses to let go of it I just put my foot over said item, wait for him/her to completely release it and once they do just commemorate them.

    Sidenote: least he's not chewing on your walls. It was a pain to deal with D:.
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    Quote Originally Posted by january View Post
    Somebody will probably come in and say not to do this, but when Finn was a puppy and he cried in his crate I would go lay in front of it on the floor and put my fingers in with him until he fell asleep and then I'd leave. I think the important part is to not let him out.

    I'd also suggest putting him in his crate more during the day. When crate training they're supposed to be in the crate more often than not, I'm pretty sure. Like don't leave him in there all day or anything obviously but maybe if you put him in there a couple times a day (while you're in the shower or making food or cleaning idk) hell get used to it more easily so he won't whine all night.
    That's what we did when he was in our room but when he saw our fingers he just tried to bite them But yeah I'm keeping him in there more today than I have been!

    Quote Originally Posted by ZivaD View Post
    Rather than using "no" - if you want/need him to release something from his mouth you would be better off teaching a specific cue/command for that (ie "drop" or "give"). I, also, would eliminate the bop to the nose. When you want to take something from the dog, the last thing you want to do is grab the item and attempt to pull it, as this will initiate a clamp/tug reflex in them (especially a puppy who is in play mind). If you must grab/hold the item putting a slight "forward" (towards the dog/mouth) pressure is more likely to trigger a loosening of the grip - at which time you can take possession.
    You can start by having the puppy take one thing in their mouth and then ask them to drop/give it and offer something even more desirable (ie food/treat or favorite toy)- making the puppy want to spit out object A to get object B (this is another reason using replacement training for appropriate chew items works). This keeps the dog from thinking of it as "losing" this thing in my mouth and teaches them to associate putting that thing out of their mouth with getting something even better IN their mouth. Start by working with items it is okay for the pupy to have and then, once he has the idea down, you can start applying it in other situations. In the meantime, prevention really is the name of the game. Eliminating the access to non-chew items is going to be a large part of the battle.
    Thanks! I'll try that Yeah we've definitely cleared out a lot of stuff from the living room but there's some things we can't really move.

    Quote Originally Posted by dolphindm04 View Post
    Find a noise/motion that he understands rather than saying "no." I snap at Lexi and say "aaaaaanck" (I have no idea how to spell/type out the noise I make. ). I guess it's similar to a buzzer sound.

    What about a lightweight sheet/blanket over the crate? I've never crate trained my dogs, so I'm not much help with that one.
    I make some obnoxious noises at him sometimes, too. I make like a loud awful "EH!" noise

    Quote Originally Posted by TriggerHappy View Post
    I agree with dolphinm04 with covering the crate.

    Summer would cry obnoxiously when she was a pup, and we (well I) placed a sheet, or some kind of cover over the gate. Found the only reason why she would cry was because she knew we were there (and I suppose wanted to play). Us being out of sight also made us out of mind ^^.

    And about the posession over treats/toys/items, if its on the ground and the pet refuses to let go of it I just put my foot over said item, wait for him/her to completely release it and once they do just commemorate them.

    Sidenote: least he's not chewing on your walls. It was a pain to deal with D:.
    If we ever move him back into our room we'll try the blanket thing Idk how much good that would do since he's by himself now?
    Oh he's not chewing the walls but he does go for the carpet


    Thanks everyone! I put him in his crate a few minutes ago and he fell asleep with no crying!
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    When Scout was little she cried all of the time in her crate. She has awful separation anxiety and I even had to take her to work with me once because she worked herself up into such a tizzy. We used to put a throw blanket that we had used in with her so that she had something that smelled like us, gave her something to cuddle up with and the crate didn't seem as big and open.
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    #10
    He took 3 naps in his crate with no crying! AAAAAAAAND he went in by himself once!
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