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Thread: the nibbling cat

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    #1

    the nibbling cat

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    My cat just turned a year old. So still a kitten, he loves to play bite and it is starting to be a bit of a problem. Sometimes its great because he is calm and sweet and just turns like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and starts biting you.
    I have tried the spray bottle, the little taps on the nose saying "no bite", I was even cutting hot peppers one time and he nibbled my hand...the reaction was hilarious but it still didn't get him to stop. I am consistent in not letting him bite so there shouldn't be a confusion factor here.I have had tons of cats (growing up, my family fostered cats), none of them had this problem. I'm not sure if it will simmer down with age or what. I am also not sure if this is a factor too but Db found him as a kitten under his porch, mommy didn't come back for him for days so we are pretty sure she got eaten by coyotes (huge problem out here) so he could very possibly be a first generation house cat.
    Any advice on how to get my little Hubert to stop biting?
    Last edited by supsavy; 07-27-2013 at 12:40 PM. Reason: fix spelling heh
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    #2
    i did what a lot of ppl on here say to do with kids lol when my dog was a puppy and doing that i bit his ear once, not hard but enough for him to feel it, and he never bit me again
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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by *Blondie* View Post
    i did what a lot of ppl on here say to do with kids lol when my dog was a puppy and doing that i bit his ear once, not hard but enough for him to feel it, and he never bit me again
    oh my gosh. lol, I would have never thought of that! I will give it a try!
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    #4
    He's getting overstimulated. What is typically happening when he finally bites or nibbles?


    Our youngest kitten had this problem and we're actually seeing a little regression since we're in the middle of a PCS. The biggest thing we do for her is play with her in a way that uses her energy appropriately. We have the different pom-poms, caterpillars, and feathers on sticks that we play with both kittens with, they like the toy mice and they love the laser pointer. If they come and sit in our lap and want to be petted before playing that way, they both (but especially the youngest) will get overstimulated and she will want to bite or scratch to relieve some energy. At a year old, he's still going to be in heavy "I need you to play with me" to help get that energy out of his system.

    I really don't see you biting him doing anything other than potentially pissing him off and then you have your face near him. Cats are quick and have five ends with sharp ends - not where I want my face if the cat is pissed off.
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    Mama cats will place a paw on their nose or hold their head down. My daughter had a cat who was an aggressive biter /attacker. She tried the tapping and the water and it made him even more aggressive. So the vet told her to take and hold him gently but firmly over the top of the nose and under the chin and then talk calmly saying things, Calm down and No bite. They will struggle and maybe even switch their tail but the vet said to do it until they seemed calmer (a few seconds sometimes as long as a minute) then release. If they try to bite again then repeat the process. It took 2-4 weeks with her cat but he did finally stop biting and attacking.
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynn View Post
    He's getting overstimulated. What is typically happening when he finally bites or nibbles?


    Our youngest kitten had this problem and we're actually seeing a little regression since we're in the middle of a PCS. The biggest thing we do for her is play with her in a way that uses her energy appropriately. We have the different pom-poms, caterpillars, and feathers on sticks that we play with both kittens with, they like the toy mice and they love the laser pointer. If they come and sit in our lap and want to be petted before playing that way, they both (but especially the youngest) will get overstimulated and she will want to bite or scratch to relieve some energy. At a year old, he's still going to be in heavy "I need you to play with me" to help get that energy out of his system.

    I really don't see you biting him doing anything other than potentially pissing him off and then you have your face near him. Cats are quick and have five ends with sharp ends - not where I want my face if the cat is pissed off.


    A lot of what you are doing now is geared towards dogs - dogs and cats are totally different animals that process things in totally different ways. Also, you say it is "starting to be a problem" - it doesn't sound like the biting is new, but the objection to it is (possibly because it is escalating?) - is that the case?
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynn View Post
    He's getting overstimulated. What is typically happening when he finally bites or nibbles?


    Our youngest kitten had this problem and we're actually seeing a little regression since we're in the middle of a PCS. The biggest thing we do for her is play with her in a way that uses her energy appropriately. We have the different pom-poms, caterpillars, and feathers on sticks that we play with both kittens with, they like the toy mice and they love the laser pointer. If they come and sit in our lap and want to be petted before playing that way, they both (but especially the youngest) will get overstimulated and she will want to bite or scratch to relieve some energy. At a year old, he's still going to be in heavy "I need you to play with me" to help get that energy out of his system.

    I really don't see you biting him doing anything other than potentially pissing him off and then you have your face near him. Cats are quick and have five ends with sharp ends - not where I want my face if the cat is pissed off.
    I normally am just petting him when he "attacks". We play fetch for 30min in the morning with his mouse to try and get some of his energy out.
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    #8
    Some cats can only be petted for so long before they will bite, so it can still be an overstimulation. Have you tried watching his body language while you are petting him? Often there will be signs when it is getting to be too much for him. But then again, some cats have very little in the way of body language changes before they bite.
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by supsavy View Post
    I normally am just petting him when he "attacks". We play fetch for 30min in the morning with his mouse to try and get some of his energy out.
    Quote Originally Posted by dekeoboe View Post
    Some cats can only be petted for so long before they will bite, so it can still be an overstimulation. Have you tried watching his body language while you are petting him? Often there will be signs when it is getting to be too much for him. But then again, some cats have very little in the way of body language changes before they bite.
    Like dekeoboe said, petting is definitely something that can overstimulate a cat. You have to think in cat terms. They sleep and they hunt. With domestic cats, play time is the equivalent of hunting. So they sleep to have energy to hunt, so when they are awake, that energy needs to go somewhere. If they aren't hunting/playing, they are going to lash out to get the energy out.

    You say that you played with him for thirty minutes - did he stop the play or did you? We play with ours until they flop down and are done. If we stop the play, they haven't gotten all of the energy out and we will need to play with them more.
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    I play till he is exhausted (panting and just flops down as if to say "no more mom"). I also have his mice all over the house so if he wants to play he normally brings one to me. I have tried to pay attention to his body language and it seems to just come out of nowhere. No tail twitching or fidgeting. I know it is still a play bite because he swats and isn't being defensive (exposed stomach).
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynn View Post
    Like dekeoboe said, petting is definitely something that can overstimulate a cat. You have to think in cat terms. They sleep and they hunt. With domestic cats, play time is the equivalent of hunting. So they sleep to have energy to hunt, so when they are awake, that energy needs to go somewhere. If they aren't hunting/playing, they are going to lash out to get the energy out.

    You say that you played with him for thirty minutes - did he stop the play or did you? We play with ours until they flop down and are done. If we stop the play, they haven't gotten all of the energy out and we will need to play with them more.

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