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Thread: Questions To Ask A Breeder?

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    Questions To Ask A Breeder?

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    [So I know I have been MIA for awhile (sorry!) but I need yall's advice!]

    DH and I have decided that it is finally the right time to get a puppy!!!!

    We have never bought a dog from a breeder so this is all new to us! We found a breeder that we love up in MD and we are going to set up a time to talk on the phone so that I can ask all of the questions I have. My question is....what should I be asking her???

    Here is what we already know...She produces about 2 litters a year. The mom and dad for the upcoming litter both have SV HD a-normal (a1) hips and elbows and she has posted their pedigrees online.

    This is the breeder we are looking at Haus Morrisson

    What else should I be asking about? What should I look for as "red flags" when talking to her?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.VinoVet View Post
    Of course you would have already put together an awesome post to answer my questions

    Any thing other than hip and elbow dysplasia that you know of for German Shepherds that I should ask about?
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetepDoc View Post
    [So I know I have been MIA for awhile (sorry!) but I need yall's advice!]

    DH and I have decided that it is finally the right time to get a puppy!!!!

    DH and I have never bought a dog from a breeder so this is all new to us! We found a breeder that we love up in MD and we are going to set up a time to talk on the phone so that I can ask all of the questions I have. My question is....what should I be asking her???

    Here is what we already know...She produces about 2 litters a year. The mom and dad for the upcoming litter both have SV HD a-normal (a1) hips and elbows and she has posted their pedigrees online.

    This is the breeder we are looking at Haus Morrisson

    What else should I be asking about? What should I look for as "red flags" when talking to her?
    I like what I see on their website after just a very quick glance.

    This is copy pasted from Whole Dog Journal, a really good source for all things dog!

    34- Responsible breeders. Yes, they do exist, although I know there are some who fancy themselves as “responsible” who wouldn’t fit my definition of the word. The list of qualities to look for in a breeder is long, but some of the most important are:

    • Breeds mentally and physically healthy, genetically sound puppies.

    • Socializes the puppies well to a variety of places and things as well as to people.

    • Breeds no more puppies than she can find homes for.

    • Requires spay/neuter for all puppies not destined for the show ring.

    • Screens prospective puppy homes carefully and only sells to appropriate private-home buyers who can provide lifelong loving care.

    • Allows the buyer to meet the mother of the puppies, and the father too, if he’s on the premises.

    • Educates buyers about needs of dogs in general and the specific breed in particular. Will not sell a puppy to a person with unrealistic expectations of the breed.

    • Provides follow-up to be sure pups are doing well and keeps in touch with owner for the life of the dog.

    • Provides resources and support for owners who are having problems with their dogs.

    • Takes back dogs who were sold any time, for any reason, for the life of the dog.

    That’s a start; a much more comprehensive list can be found at wonderpuppy.net/1breeding.php. By the way, responsible breeders never:

    • Sell puppies to pet stores.

    • Sell sight unseen over the Internet. (They may have a website, but actual sales are personal, and the breeder should want to meet the buyer and have the buyer meet the puppy.)

    • Meet you halfway and sell you the puppy out of the back of a truck.

    • Prevent you from seeing the conditions under which the puppies were raised.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetepDoc View Post
    Of course you would have already put together an awesome post to answer my questions

    Any thing other than hip and elbow dysplasia that you know of for German Shepherds that I should ask about?
    Honestly, GSD are one of the most disease filled breeds we see, and so much of it hasnt been bred out/figured how to be bred out/cant be bred out. A lot of it is a combo of genetics and luck, so asking if the parents have had a GDV cant help figure out if yours will get GDV (bloat). They are a rough breed, medically.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.VinoVet View Post
    Honestly, GSD are one of the most disease filled breeds we see, and so much of it hasnt been bred out/figured how to be bred out/cant be bred out. A lot of it is a combo of genetics and luck, so asking if the parents have had a GDV cant help figure out if yours will get GDV (bloat). They are a rough breed, medically.
    I totally agree. I know far more GSD's with problems than without. They are pretty dogs though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BiggyBiggs View Post
    I like what I see on their website after just a very quick glance.

    This is copy pasted from Whole Dog Journal, a really good source for all things dog!
    Thanks for the list!

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.VinoVet View Post
    Honestly, GSD are one of the most disease filled breeds we see, and so much of it hasnt been bred out/figured how to be bred out/cant be bred out. A lot of it is a combo of genetics and luck, so asking if the parents have had a GDV cant help figure out if yours will get GDV (bloat). They are a rough breed, medically.
    I hadn't heard about GDV...off to read more about it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by BiggyBiggs View Post
    I totally agree. I know far more GSD's with problems than without. They are pretty dogs though.
    Yeah their temperament is what really draws DH and I to them. and they are such beautiful dogs! I figure starting with a reputable breeder will help reduce the chances of some of the more common problems such as hip dysplasia. But like VinoVet said, it sounds like there may be some medical problems that just end up being luck of the draw.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetepDoc View Post
    Thanks for the list!



    I hadn't heard about GDV...off to read more about it!
    Some other diseases include (not limited to): pannus, megaesophagus (often secondary, but not always, to myasthenia gravis), exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, pancreatitis, IBS, stress induced diarrhea, chronic colitis (similar to crohns), perianal fistulas, von Willibrands disease, haemophilia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, aortic stenosis, pulmonic stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrythmias, tonsssssss of cancers (anal sac adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, GI adenocarcinoma are top, and squamous cell carcinoma), eye melanoma, anterior uveitis, cataracts, retinal dysplasia, cushings disease, discoid lupus, severe allergies that require lifelong immunosuppressants, pemphigus vulgaris, incontinence, cirrhosis, epilepsy, lumbosacral stenosis, diskospondylosis, osteochondrosis dessicans, elbow dysplasia, panosteitis, ununited anconeal process, hip dysplasia, hypertrophic osteodystrophy, atopy, acramal lick dermatitis, epilepsy

    Thats a short list
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    Just so you know, I think they can be great dogs, and obvi you are doing your research, which is more than I can say for most people who get germans, so kudos to you, just be aware of the massive vet bills you may have to pay. You may not. It very much can be luck of the draw (and breeding, a lot of these are breeding + environmental + luck), so you may have totally normal dogs, but their life spans do tend to be shorter, even when they are healthy, than other dogs.
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