Military Significant Others and Spouse Support - MilitarySOS.com
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Question for the masses

  1. MilitarySOS Jewel
    katinahat's Avatar
    katinahat is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    20,893

    #1

    Question for the masses

    Advertisements
    I guess this goes here? When Aubs gets older, like elementary school age (maybe 4th or 5th grade?), I'm looking at getting together a local group of homeschoolers and doing a chick/duck/quail (haven't decided which yet) unit and getting eggs and an incubator. We'd learn about the basics before we got them, then watch them go through the cycle and hatch, then care for them for a bit. I've already found a school supply store that sells all of the equipment and the fertilized eggs to homeschoolers, so that's not an issue.

    Here's my question-- are there farms or places that will take the chicks and raise them well? It's not just a science experiment, these are real living critters, so I don't want them to end up abandoned or neglected. We likely won't have the land/facilities, so I'll have to entrust them to someone else. I'm obviously a few years out, but I want to have an idea of what to look for when we get closer. So yeah, any recommendations? I'd really appreciate them.
    ​​​

    “Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” -- Carl Sagan

  2. MilitarySOS Jewel
    Jazmine's Avatar
    Jazmine is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    9,757

    #2
    My first grade class raised chickens and ducks and we brought them to a small family farm in Connecticut. Our class went to the farm and got to see the animals and where our chickens and ducks would live. As you get closer you might want to keep an eye out for small farms at Farmer's Markets and in your area.
  3. Senior Member
    CC22's Avatar
    CC22 is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Together in the Hood!
    Posts
    2,119
    Blog Entries
    22
    #3
    Well... I've heard of people getting abby ducks for easter... And then they let the ducks live outside, then when the time comes, the ducks just fly away to be on their own... (I've heard of them coming back to visit the houses though too).

    So I guess my point is, if it's a duck you might not even have to find it a home.

    I've never had personal experience with it, but that it what I've heard from people. I can understand still wanting a place where you know for sure it would be safe... But I also don't think it's a bad thing to have more wild ducks? lol.

    Anyway, you'd have to look into it more obvs.
  4. Do or do not... There is no try.~ Yoda, Jedi Master
    Crystal's Avatar
    Crystal is offline
    Do or do not... There is no try.~ Yoda, Jedi Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    "Well, if there's a bright center to the universe, you're on the planet that it's farthest from."
    Posts
    53,549




    #4
    I know some homeschooling families that keep them in their back yard for the eggs. I guess it would depend on local ordinances.
    I'm not Lynn, but we ARE MSOS Best Friends and MSOS Twins.
  5. MilitarySOS Jewel
    Ol' Grey Mare's Avatar
    Ol' Grey Mare is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    14,646
    #5
    You could do a meat bird like a cornish cross - they are ready for processing in a matter of just 8-12 weeks so you aren't really looking at a long commitment for care. You could get in touch with either the local FFA chapter(s) or the 4-H groups for some coordination with things like resources for either direct processing (if you go with a short cycle bird) or placement for longer term use of the birds as project animals, etc.
  6. Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    Tojai's Avatar
    Tojai is offline
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    St. Pete FL
    Posts
    30,026


    #6
    If you have any local farm supply stores I would ask them. It's a good place to make connections ... I'm not sure what your area is like but people would come from 50+ miles to our local supply store when I was growing up.

    Might also want to ask about different kinds of birds, too. Guineas are really popular in a lot of areas because they are low maintenance and they're great at eating bugs. They're less messy and require less room than chickens. Not sure about quail, I haven't really worked with them, but I think chickens and ducks can be somewhat high maintenance, just speaking from experience. Of course that also depends on how long after they hatch that you plan on keeping them. It's really neat seeing how much they change as they grow though.
  7. MilitarySOS Jewel
    Procella's Avatar
    Procella is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    6,983
    #7
    Maybe there is a CSA (community support agriculture) farm that will be willing to help with the unit. I know some give the option of "buying" a chicken and having the farm raise them for the eggs. At the end of the season either they can donate the chicken back to the farm or have it slaughtered and pick up the meat. I would guess they would have a hatching set up.
  8. MilitarySOS Jewel
    Ol' Grey Mare's Avatar
    Ol' Grey Mare is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    14,646
    #8
    If you went with the direct processing you could contact local food banks about donating the resulting meat - may even be able to work a deal for a break on processing fees if that is how you work it.
  9. MilitarySOS Jewel
    katinahat's Avatar
    katinahat is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    20,893

    #9
    Very interesting, thanks so much! I hadn't even thought about direct processing-- that could be a great option. I just worry about the kids being upset that we're eating fluffy and stripey, kwim? But honestly, they have to learn where meat comes from (not just learn in theory, but understand by seeing the live animal first), so I'm not opposed to it.

    I wonder if a local farm could host them and we could visit them weekly to see the changes as they grow? That could be cool-- plus, there's a built in weekly field trip!

    I had thought about keeping them in the backyard, but that definitely varies city-to-city. Also, if we're renters, the owner may not be very flexible on that. We (optimistically lol) plan on owning the next house that we move to in CONUS, though, so hopefully that won't be an issue.
    ​​​

    “Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” -- Carl Sagan

  10. Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    Tojai's Avatar
    Tojai is offline
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    St. Pete FL
    Posts
    30,026


    #10
    As for keeping in the backyard - it depends on what kind of area you are in too. Cats will always be something to watch out for, but birds are really tempting prey animals for things like raccoons, possums, foxes, etc. and they can be VERY good about breaking into coops and cages if you don't secure them really well. It's certainly possible to build a secure enclosure for them but it's going to be an investment in terms of time/resources/space etc.
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •