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Thread: 2 different breeds?

  1. Mombie.
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    #1

    2 different breeds?

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    We have a Lab/Rot mix, total sweetheart and oddly submissive, unless someone she doesn't know/like gets to close to one of us...then she goes a little nuts.

    Anyhow, we want to (eventually) get another dog. We'd always thought it'd be another Lab of some sort but DH has been talking about a Yorkie. (So odd to me since he wants a Mastiff once the kids are older.) I don't mind it, out neighbor has one and he's so sweet and fantastic with the kids. I wouldn't want to get one until the kids are a little older because they are grabby and I'd be afraid they'd accidentally hurt a small pup. They're used to Abbey being able to take and enjoy their playing.

    I know we'd need to get a new pup, right after they are ok to be separated, because of Abbey's nature. That way she'd be more of a mother, which she'll probably love since she mothers all of us.

    My question is...are these breeds compatible? Abbey is crazy gentle and is so good with kids, and the pup across the way. I just want to make sure all research is done before we do anything. Abbey has a vet appt in a few weeks and we'll be talking to her to get her advice but I was wondering if you guys had any.



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    #2
    I dunno how much it depends on breeds, but more the personality of the dog... There's a couple people in this neighborhood who have similar situations. A German Shepard and a Chihuahua and some kind of pit looking thing (it's not a pit though since we're on post) and a chihuahua. So I think a big dog and a small dog can def work.
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    #3
    My two Great Danes adore my miniature Dachshunds. But I agree that it is the temperament, not the breed.
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by sqrllvr123 View Post
    I know we'd need to get a new pup, right after they are ok to be separated, because of Abbey's nature. That way she'd be more of a mother, which she'll probably love since she mothers all of us.
    I might be dumb or missing something obvious, but I don't get this part? What needs to be separated? I am so confused

    Anyway, yeah, as long as your dog is good with smaller dogs I don't see having a small and big dog being a problem.
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by BiggyBiggs View Post
    I might be dumb or missing something obvious, but I don't get this part? What needs to be separated? I am so confused

    Anyway, yeah, as long as your dog is good with smaller dogs I don't see having a small and big dog being a problem.
    I took that to mean the pup being able to be separated from mother/litter and ready to go to the new home.....
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    #6
    I do think a pup is a good way to go (or an adult dog known to be good with large dogs, kids, etc) because small breeds *can* be fearful/nervous if not properly socialized/raised as a dog vs. raised as a toy, accessory or baby. A fearful/insecure little dog will either be a nervous wreck or can become aggerssive - neither of which would be good. A lot of the "little dog syndrome" issues people have - being nippy, trying to go at bigger dogs to start things, etc stem from improper socialization causing an insecure dog. Our little pom, Bogey, that we adopted last year is a classic insecure little dog - he's come a long way, but it didn't have to be that way for him at all had he been brought up in a better setting. He loves our big dogs now, but it took some work to get to that point and the issues were all on his side of things as he was prone to being overly assertive/aggressive in a "get you before you get me" sort of mindset - luckily for him neither of our big dogs are inclined to take the bait and so we've had time to work through it.
    Little dog/big dog can ba great combo. It is important to be aware of things a bit more, imo, though because if things do go badly you have a situation where it stands to go VERY badly very quickly just from the sheer size difference and the ability for the larger dog to inflict a massive amount of damage even without meaning to - whereas with more closely matched size dogs it wouldn't be as serious for the same situation to play out.
  7. Mombie.
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ZivaD View Post
    I took that to mean the pup being able to be separated from mother/litter and ready to go to the new home.....
    Yep!



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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by ZivaD View Post
    I do think a pup is a good way to go (or an adult dog known to be good with large dogs, kids, etc) because small breeds *can* be fearful/nervous if not properly socialized/raised as a dog vs. raised as a toy, accessory or baby. A fearful/insecure little dog will either be a nervous wreck or can become aggerssive - neither of which would be good. A lot of the "little dog syndrome" issues people have - being nippy, trying to go at bigger dogs to start things, etc stem from improper socialization causing an insecure dog. Our little pom, Bogey, that we adopted last year is a classic insecure little dog - he's come a long way, but it didn't have to be that way for him at all had he been brought up in a better setting. He loves our big dogs now, but it took some work to get to that point and the issues were all on his side of things as he was prone to being overly assertive/aggressive in a "get you before you get me" sort of mindset - luckily for him neither of our big dogs are inclined to take the bait and so we've had time to work through it.
    Little dog/big dog can ba great combo. It is important to be aware of things a bit more, imo, though because if things do go badly you have a situation where it stands to go VERY badly very quickly just from the sheer size difference and the ability for the larger dog to inflict a massive amount of damage even without meaning to - whereas with more closely matched size dogs it wouldn't be as serious for the same situation to play out.
    Lots of good points. Thank you!

    Right after we had Maddie, we adopted a pup. She was a Pit mix of some sort, but small, and we were told she was really young. (Adopted her from a rescue.) Ya. Not so. We took her to the vet, she was as big as she was going to get and at least 2 years old. She came in with a major attitude and took control of everything. Abbey couldn't take it and spent a lot of time hiding. This dog was the size of one of Abbey's legs and she still controlled her. There was an accident and, after almost $2000 in vet bills, we had to give her back to the rescue. She snapped and attacked Abbey and started growling at the kids. We called the rescue and they said she was no longer a dog that was safe to be around, so they took her back to work with her.

    We don't want to go through something like that again. Abbey needs to be comfortable and enjoy the company of this other dog. So, be it a small or large, we want a brand new puppy so it can grow with affection towards Abbey, not the need to control her.



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    #9
    Both of our neighbors had large dog/small dog combos (german shepherd/dachshund and german shepherd/yorkie) that get along well with one another so I agree with others that I think it's all about the dog not the breed. I know the neighbor with the GS/doxie got the doxie when it was a pup and she had no problem taking to the GS. They had to get rid of the GS for other reasons but after that the dachshund only wanted to play with big dogs because she loved them so much and missed her "brother".
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    #10
    I have a Yorkie in a house with two big dogs. If your dog is gentle it'll probably be fine, but yorkies can be bossy so you have to be careful not to let them get like that. When we got the Yorkie we had another big dog and she totally thought he was her baby and she's still really protective of him.

    Then I brought my golden retriever home and he's a psychopath so he's not allowed to play with the Yorkie. He's too big and hell hurt him, he has no concept of being gentle with him at all. They like each other though and there have never been issues in that regard.
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