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Thread: Gold bond powder for hot spots?

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    #1

    Gold bond powder for hot spots?

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    The Internet told me you can put gold bond powder on an itchy dog to prevent hot spots. Before I try this, what are the chances this will do more harm than good?

    My golden retriever has a hot spot. It's being treated and its only his second one ever, but this will be his first horrible humid Florida summer so I expect more skin issues. Is this safe orrrr does anybody have better tips?
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    Tips: try to remove the collar for 3 hours a day to let it dry out. Especially if they got it wet- make sure the collar is completely dry before putting it back on. If the dog does get wet, make sure they get completely dry, either by toweling or blow dryer. Hot spots come from moisture. Avoid them getting wet is possible. Brush brush brush! Remove the undercoat to help get more air circulating to the skin.

    Baby powder can help prevent to a degree, but if the dog is often getting wet, or licking in a certain spot, no, it wont help. And dont use it too much, you dont want their skin to totally dry out.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.VinoVet View Post
    Tips: try to remove the collar for 3 hours a day to let it dry out. Especially if they got it wet- make sure the collar is completely dry before putting it back on. If the dog does get wet, make sure they get completely dry, either by toweling or blow dryer. Hot spots come from moisture. Avoid them getting wet is possible. Brush brush brush! Remove the undercoat to help get more air circulating to the skin.

    Baby powder can help prevent to a degree, but if the dog is often getting wet, or licking in a certain spot, no, it wont help. And dont use it too much, you dont want their skin to totally dry out.
    He doesn't get the spots by his collar at all, both have been on his side near his hips. Would you still recommend removing the collar?

    I'll try brushing him more, he only gets brushed when I'm gonna use his furminator. I had no idea that mattered for their skin, maybe that's why he has the hot spots to begin with.
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    Quote Originally Posted by january View Post
    He doesn't get the spots by his collar at all, both have been on his side near his hips. Would you still recommend removing the collar?

    I'll try brushing him more, he only gets brushed when I'm gonna use his furminator. I had no idea that mattered for their skin, maybe that's why he has the hot spots to begin with.
    What a hot spot is is a bacterial overgrowth on the skin that overcomes skin defenses. These arise either due to concurrent disease or too much moisture trapping bacteria near the skin. Often they are in spots where moisture cannot escape either due to skin barriers or excessive hair (under collars, in armpits, in the feathers) or where dogs lick constantly (due to allergies, due to boredom or nervousness, due to bugs). Hot spots on the sides and butt often occur because thats where fleas tend to bite. Not saying your dog has fleas, but outside there are fleas, and the do occationally bite a dog before they die, so your dog will then scratch or lick, which irritates the skin and then moisture in the tongue or air traps bacteria- ta da! hot spot.

    As a preventative measure I would try to brush more, especially in areas where he seems to get them, and I still would remove the collar each day for a little bit, just to air out the area. Prevention is always easier then treatment.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.VinoVet View Post
    What a hot spot is is a bacterial overgrowth on the skin that overcomes skin defenses. These arise either due to concurrent disease or too much moisture trapping bacteria near the skin. Often they are in spots where moisture cannot escape either due to skin barriers or excessive hair (under collars, in armpits, in the feathers) or where dogs lick constantly (due to allergies, due to boredom or nervousness, due to bugs). Hot spots on the sides and butt often occur because thats where fleas tend to bite. Not saying your dog has fleas, but outside there are fleas, and the do occationally bite a dog before they die, so your dog will then scratch or lick, which irritates the skin and then moisture in the tongue or air traps bacteria- ta da! hot spot.

    As a preventative measure I would try to brush more, especially in areas where he seems to get them, and I still would remove the collar each day for a little bit, just to air out the area. Prevention is always easier then treatment.
    Yeah I'm pretty sure he doesn't have fleas, none have ever been found on him and he and our other dogs are on trifexis. That makes sense though, thanks Vino!

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