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Thread: what did you eat!?

  1. alym
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    Confused what did you eat!?

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    Nilla was choking on something in my bathroom today.. my guess is that she licked hair or an itty bitty piece of toilet paper from the floor LOL.
    It scared the hell out of me i gave her a doggie hemlic manuver & she was okay but 2 hours later she's still acts like she's gonna puke/ makes that choking sound?
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    #2
    has she been able to eat or drink anything? She may need to to the vet
  3. alym
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    yeah she ate her lunch and drank water and pooped/peed a couple times..
    she's also been coughing hard coughs every once in a great while ever scince we brought her home and i hope that it's not a cold or anything
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    Is it a hacking cough? I'd take her to the vet to rule out kennel cough

    G'luck
  5. alym
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    yeah it's hacking.. what's kennel cough?
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    Take her to the vet then. I would call asap and explain about the cough. It is highly contagious among dogs so they willw ant to take you back to a room asap instead of having you wait in a waiting room...

    Kennel Cough - Tracheobronchitis
    The incubation period from the time a dog is exposed until clinical signs appear varies depending on which infectious agent is the cause. In general it appears to be about 3 to 5 days with Bordetella. The infection tends to be mild except for a very harsh cough that often prompts owners to think that their dog "has something caught in his throat". In some dogs it can lead to pneumonia or more serious signs. Cough suppressants can be used to control the cough and antibiotics may be necessary for stubborn infections or to try to stop the spread of the bacteria in multiple dog households. It is probably a good idea to vaccinate dogs who will be exposed to large numbers of other dogs, such as at shows, obedience classes or the classic cause -- when left in kennels. The intranasal vaccine is pretty fast acting, providing some protection in as little as 5 days. The injectable version of the vaccine may provide longer immunity, though. Some vets use both to get maximum protection. We don't use either one routinely but give the intranasal vaccine to our patients who will be exposed to groups of dogs.

    Canine infectious tracheobronchitis (kennel cough) is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in dogs. Fortunately, the majority of cases are not serious resolving on their own in 1 to 2 weeks . But because some dogs develop life- threatening complications, you should take precautions to prevent your pooch from becoming infected with this highly contagious disease.

    Kennel cough can be caused by a number of different airborne bacteria (such as Bordetella bronchiseptica) and viruses (such as canine parainfluenza) or a mycoplasma (an organism somewhere between a virus and a bacteria). Typically, more than one of these pathogens (disease-causing agents) must bombard the dog at once to trigger illness. Such a multifaceted attack is most likely to occur when a dog spends time in close quarters with many other dogs. Dogs that attend dog shows, travel frequently, or stay at kennels have a higher risk of developing kennel cough than do dogs that stay at home most of the time.

    The primary sign of kennel cough is a dry- sounding, spasmodic cough caused by pathogens that induce inflammation of the trachea (windpipe) and bronchi (air passages into the lungs). At the end of a coughing spell, a dog will often retch and cough up a white foamy discharge. Some dogs also develop conjunctivitis (inflammation of the membrane lining the eyelids), rhinitis (inflammation of the nasal mucous membrane), and a nasal discharge. Affected dogs usually remain active and alert and continue to eat well. But if you suspect your dog has kennel cough, isolate it from other dogs and call your veterinarian.

    Your veterinarian can typically diagnose kennel cough from a physical exam and history. The cough is very characteristic and can be easily elicited by massaging the dog's larynx or trachea But if the dog is depressed; feverish; expelling a thick yellow or green discharge from its nose; or making abnormal lung sounds, your veterinarian may want to perform diagnostic tests such as a complete blood count (CBC) chest x-ray, and laboratory analysis of the microorganisms inhabiting your dog's airways. These tests can help determine whether the dog has developed pneumonia or another infectious illness such as canine distemper.

    Immunization can be an important part of a kennel- cough prevention program and is recommended . But since the illness is caused by multiple organisms - making effective immunization difficult - you should focus on minimizing your dog's exposure to the disease-causing organisms themselves. Don't share your dog's toys or food and water bowls with unfamiliar dogs. And if your dog is in an indoor kennel or show, make sure the indoor area is adequately ventilated so airborne organisms are transferred outside.

    If your dog is diagnosed with kennel cough, your veterinarian will likely prescribe an antibiotic to help prevent any secondary bacterial infection and a cough suppressant. We have found in those persistent cases of kennel cough, the use of a relatively new antibiotic, azithromycin, to be effective. This medication is very effective in the treatment of the mycoplasmal forms of tracheobronchitis. Again, before any treatment regimen administered, is it is imperative that a proper veterinary examination and appropriate diagnostics be performed.
  7. alym
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    if it worsens then ill take her to the vet it's occasional and she doesn't have any of those signs yet like the nasal/white discharge.. we leave her indoors most of the time in/out of the kennel & we never socialize her with other dogs/ take her out often.
    but if it does worsen in 1-2 weeks like they said then i'll take her to get checked/get her shots.. thanks kaymara!
  8. christymichelle
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    aww, i hope she gets to feeling better
  9. nicole
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    She should have already been vaccinated against bordatella, before you even brought her home. If not, you need to take her ASAP. My dog exhibited the same symptoms you described about 2 months ago. He ended up having "dog flu", which turned into a respiratory infection. At the time he hadn't been exposed to any dogs since his littermates, which was months earlier. I took him in the second I saw weird symptoms, they prescribed antibiotics, and after a few days he got better. Either way, if she's coughing/choking, and you can't see anything stuck in her throat, she needs to go to the vet.
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by nicole
    She should have already been vaccinated against bordatella, before you even brought her home. If not, you need to take her ASAP. My dog exhibited the same symptoms you described about 2 months ago. He ended up having "dog flu", which turned into a respiratory infection. At the time he hadn't been exposed to any dogs since his littermates, which was months earlier. I took him in the second I saw weird symptoms, they prescribed antibiotics, and after a few days he got better. Either way, if she's coughing/choking, and you can't see anything stuck in her throat, she needs to go to the vet.
    Bordatella actually is not a required vaccine. It is optional. So the dog may not of been vaccinated against it.

    But I would definatly take the dog in for a checkup. All doggies should go in for a well puppy exam when you first get em. They can give you the shot schedule, (the animal is going to need to get shots every 3 weeks until up to date on their vax..and will get a rabies at the final shot set that will be good for 1 year) Do a fecal to check for worms, parasites and the like etc. WHen I worked in a vet clinic we always reccomend bringing in new puppies/doggies.

    Since it is a young puppy if it does have bordatella then waiting might not be in the best interest. If it was an adult with an adult immune system then maybe. But such a young puppy I wouldn't. I would make an appt and get it looked into. Rule out anything bad and get some meds if needed. You would rather make an unneeded appt and have her be fine then not make one and have her not. I know it costs money for an appt but if you let it go and it is serious you may pay twice as much down the road

    G'luck and hope the puppy feels better
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