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Thread: Social Experiment in DC

  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Social Experiment in DC

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    My brother sent me this.
    I haven't checked Snopes but this wouldn't surprise me.

    A Violinist in the Metro






    A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning.. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that thousands of people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.



    Three minutes went by and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried on to meet his schedule.



    A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping continued to walk.



    A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again.. Clearly he was late for work.



    The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.



    In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.?



    No one knew this but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the best musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written with a violin worth 3.5 million dollars.



    Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston and the seats averaged $100.



    This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and priorities of people.
    The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour:
    Do we perceive beauty?
    Do we stop to appreciate it?
    Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?


    One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

    If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?
  2. ash
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    #2
    snopes says true


    Honestly, Jesus Christ himself couldn't make me late for work though so

    I think it would be irresponsible for someone to miss their train in order to hear a musician regardless of who it was. I don't think this really says any big thing about our society except that maybe people actually do have a work ethic
    this is like a bad movie, and i'd give it a 5 on my netflix
  3. Old Newbie
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    #3

    Jump for Joy OH MY GOD!!!! WAS THIS A FEW DAYS AGO???? I GAVE HIM MONEY!!!!!!!!!!!!! WOOO HOOO!!!

    Well this was not done in the morning ... this was done in the evening whereI had just gotten off work at the Farragut North exit ... IT WAS BEAUTIFUL MUSIC It was absolutely gorgeous!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Wow I was wondering wow this man is really great!!!!!!! and I though oh wow ... times are tough!!!! so yeah wow this is incredible!!!!! I knew something was odd about his presence ... and why the metro people didn't scurr him off because it was INSIDE the metro ... not at the top outside... wow... incredible... I couldnt stop because I was in a hurry to get home ... but yes I did give him a dollar


    I agree ... we do need to stop and revisit our lives and stop being soooo routine... value other things besides material items
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    #4
    That is so interesting! I think a lot of it has to do with the city. It seems to me very typical of DC that there would be a famous musician literally in front of people but hardly anyone stop to notice. I love this city and have been here for several years but it seems all people have on their minds is their career and how they can get ahead--especially when commuting on metro. Other cities--for example, New York, have had musicians in subways for years which attract large crowds simply enjoying their music and performance art.

    In its defense, musicians in metro were banned up until the past year or so. But I think this is a valuable lesson, nonetheless, to take a few to stop and smell the roses!
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    #5
    This was last year, they did a story on it in the local news.
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by JenniferS View Post
    My brother sent me this.
    I haven't checked Snopes but this wouldn't surprise me.

    A Violinist in the Metro






    A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning.. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that thousands of people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.



    Three minutes went by and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried on to meet his schedule.



    A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping continued to walk.



    A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again.. Clearly he was late for work.



    The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.



    In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.?



    No one knew this but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the best musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written with a violin worth 3.5 million dollars.



    Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston and the seats averaged $100.



    This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and priorities of people.
    The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour:
    Do we perceive beauty?
    Do we stop to appreciate it?
    Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?


    One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

    If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?
    doesnt surprise me in DC... VERY VERY different mentality than NY and other places

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