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Thread: Turkey dependent evac :(

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    #31
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    I talked to my friends earlier and the wife is taking both kids to her parents then has to return to Turkey. Right now they both are there another year, they heard that it might be possible to curtail her DEROS and she will PCS to their follow on but the husband will have to stay the entire time.

    Yeah they were lucky she is being allowed to take the kids home. Part of the family care plan is to have someone he will bring them back to the states to whoever is going to be their long term caregiver(her parents)
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    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by villanelle View Post
    Dual military (or single parents) are required to have a family care plan so that if they can still be deployable. It's basically someone who agrees to take your kids while you are sent away. Without that, the military would be unable to use the service member in his or her full capacity.

    The military absolutely will and does deploy both parents at the same time. It's one reason I always mention on here that people considering joining as dual military give it a lot of thought. Obviously, dual mil can and does work, but these are complications people sometimes don't think about. You need to have a grandma or uncle or best friend willing to take your kids for a good amount of time.

    In this case, it's extra crappy because it is a full year, which would be unusual as an overlap for 2 deployed service members.
    Thank you, I couldn't remember "family care plan" for the life of me! So shitty.

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    #33
    Can someone explain to me what the article says? For some reason it won't load properly for me so I can't read it. Please and thank you!
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    #34
    Quote Originally Posted by caljmw649 View Post
    Can someone explain to me what the article says? For some reason it won't load properly for me so I can't read it. Please and thank you!
    The State Department for security reasons is evacuating all dependents and pets from Turkey. Incirlik as well as a couple of smaller installations.
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    #35
    Quote Originally Posted by villanelle View Post
    Mostly, that's on the service member. In fact, in some situations they can get in some trouble if they don't have a reliable family care plan. It sounds cold, but part of the job is the military being able to say, "you are leaving tomorrow". If they can't do that, the service member loses some of his or her usefulness to the military.They need someone they can use fully, not someone who can only deployed June-August because that's when his mother, a school teacher, is available to take the kids, oh but not July 1-10 because mom will be traveling then. Part of the job means basically being always available for whatever. I understand that for people with kids, that's not always easy, and I can't imagine how hard it would be to stay in Turkey and send your kids to the US for a year. That's so sad and I'm sure very painful. And I'm sure it's something that causes a lot of people to eventually get out of the military if they are a single parent or dual military.

    When you submit your plan, you are responsible for making sure it is viable. You can't just say, "my mom would probably take the kids". You need to confirm with your mom and talk through the logistics. If your mom becomes chronically ill or for some other reason unable to care for your kids long term, you need to come up with another plan. Not having a family care plan is potentially reason for discharge, because the military needs to be able to rely on you. What do they do if a call comes down that a unit is deploying in a week and a service member suddenly says, "turns out mom can't take Timmy"? Well, that will depend a lot on the circumstances, but the SM would likely be in some trouble for that (barring extenuating circumstances). They could be delayed a short while while they come up with another plan, but if that doesn't work, they could be separated. There may be other options, but I don't know offhand what they would be.
    At our last base, I was part of a care plan for our friends who were a mil-mil couple. There actually was paperwork involved that I had to sign stating that I would be responsible for their kiddo. So, from my experience, it isn't just a "yeah, so-and-so should be able to", there is actually a physical plan that is on record with all parties in agreement. In my case, I was the individual immediately available if there was a short notice TDY or deployment (or even if they both had to stay late at work for whatever reason and couldn't pick their child up at school/daycare/etc.) and if there was anything long-term, care would be transferred to the grandparents. I think it just comes with the territory of being a mil-mil couple and they are very much aware that they could both be gone at the same time!

    Obviously, I think in this situation it really is tough, as your tour is changing from accompanied to unaccompanied on extremely short notice.
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    #36
    Quote Originally Posted by caljmw649 View Post
    Can someone explain to me what the article says? For some reason it won't load properly for me so I can't read it. Please and thank you!
    KAISERSLAUTERN, Germany — The Pentagon is ordering nearly 700 military family members to leave Incirlik Air Base and two smaller military installations in Turkey because of concerns over the deteriorating security environment there.

    Families are expected to begin leaving Turkey on Wednesday, stopping first at Ramstein Air Base in Germany, before continuing on to the States or other duty locations, U.S. European Command told Stars and Stripes.

    “We understand this is disruptive to our military families, but we must keep them safe and ensure the combat effectiveness of our forces to support our strong ally Turkey in the fight against terrorism,” EUCOM chief Gen. Philip Breedlove said Tuesday in a statement.

    The mandatory departure order, announced by the State Department, affects nearly all Defense Department dependents assigned to Incirlik, as well as those at smaller bases in Izmir and Mugla. The families of U.S. diplomats in the same areas also are ordered to depart.

    On Monday Israel issued a new travel advisory for Turkey, warning Israeli citizens to leave the country as soon as possible and avoid any traveling there.

    About 670 dependents are expected to be evacuated, along with 287 pets. About 770 dependents, most from Incirlik, are currently in Turkey, EUCOM spokeswoman Julie Weckerlein said. Those allowed to stay are family members with mission-essential jobs.

    The dramatic move to get families out of Turkey comes several weeks after Americans at Incirlik were put on base lockdown, when the force-protection level was raised to the military’s highest threat condition. The elementary/high school at Incirlik was temporarily shuttered on March 9 as a result.

    Classes for Incirlik students resumed Monday and Tuesday at different locations on base, but that arrangement appears to be short-lived given Tuesday’s announcement.

    Some families had already opted to leave Incirlik. In September, the Air Force authorized the voluntary early departure of residents, a temporary measure that resulted in about 100 family members leaving for the States. School enrollment since the fall has plummeted by more than 100 students, leaving about 250 students at the school.

    Also in September, the Air Force suspended the move of U.S. servicemembers’ families to Incirlik, an early signal of the growing concern over violence in the region.

    Incirlik has one of the smallest populations of any U.S. Air Forces in Europe facility, with fewer than 2,000 airmen normally assigned there. Weckerlein said no decisions have been made on the future status of Incirlik as a continued destination for families.

    “They will review this in the future,” she said.

    The evacuation does not signify a permanent decision to end accompanied tours to Turkey, EUCOM said.

    “It is intended to mitigate the risk to DOD elements and personnel, including family members, while ensuring the combat effectiveness of U.S. forces and our mission support to operations in Turkey,” according to the EUCOM statement.

    Still, the long-term prospects for Incirlik as an accompanied destination appear to be in limbo.

    Last week, the Incirlik base commander said during an American Forces Network “commander’s corner” spot that there was nothing official yet regarding changing the status of Incirlik as an accompanied tour for airmen. But, if there were a transition, “it wouldn’t surprise me to see Kunsan-style assignments where everybody is on a one-year remote,” said Col. John Walker, 39th Air Base Wing commander, in the video posted Friday to the base’s Facebook site. He was referring to airmen based in South Korea.

    “So, what’s the future going to look like? I’m really interested in that myself,” he said.

    Uncertainty about the nature of future deployments to the base comes as military operations at Incirlik have increased. Now, the base is on the front lines of the fight against the Islamic State group in Syria and Iraq, with U.S. fighters routinely launching from Incirlik on strike missions.

    In July, U.S. troops and aircraft began rotating through Incirlik in larger numbers as part of the ramping up of the air campaign. At the same time, NATO allies have been conducting operations from Incirlik, including surveillance flights around the Turkish border.

    For the U.S., Incirlik Air Base has long been a strategic spoke for U.S. forces, dating back to the Cold War. While Incirlik has no permanent U.S. aircraft assigned, the base has long served as a temporary hub for cargo and refueling missions supporting U.S. aircraft in places such as Iraq and Afghanistan.

    The base also is only about 200 miles from the Syrian border, where the transit of foreigners back and forth to Turkey has been a long-standing concern for the U.S. and its allies.

    The town of Incirlik, a small village, is about 10 miles from the largely conservative Turkish city of Adana, home to nearly 2 million people.

    NATO's Allied Land Command is based at Izmir and there is a Turkish base at Mugla where some U.S. military personnel go for training and other missions.
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    #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Volare. View Post
    KAISERSLAUTERN, Germany — The Pentagon is ordering nearly 700 military family members to leave Incirlik Air Base and two smaller military installations in Turkey because of concerns over the deteriorating security environment there.

    Families are expected to begin leaving Turkey on Wednesday, stopping first at Ramstein Air Base in Germany, before continuing on to the States or other duty locations, U.S. European Command told Stars and Stripes.

    “We understand this is disruptive to our military families, but we must keep them safe and ensure the combat effectiveness of our forces to support our strong ally Turkey in the fight against terrorism,” EUCOM chief Gen. Philip Breedlove said Tuesday in a statement.

    The mandatory departure order, announced by the State Department, affects nearly all Defense Department dependents assigned to Incirlik, as well as those at smaller bases in Izmir and Mugla. The families of U.S. diplomats in the same areas also are ordered to depart.

    On Monday Israel issued a new travel advisory for Turkey, warning Israeli citizens to leave the country as soon as possible and avoid any traveling there.

    About 670 dependents are expected to be evacuated, along with 287 pets. About 770 dependents, most from Incirlik, are currently in Turkey, EUCOM spokeswoman Julie Weckerlein said. Those allowed to stay are family members with mission-essential jobs.

    The dramatic move to get families out of Turkey comes several weeks after Americans at Incirlik were put on base lockdown, when the force-protection level was raised to the military’s highest threat condition. The elementary/high school at Incirlik was temporarily shuttered on March 9 as a result.

    Classes for Incirlik students resumed Monday and Tuesday at different locations on base, but that arrangement appears to be short-lived given Tuesday’s announcement.

    Some families had already opted to leave Incirlik. In September, the Air Force authorized the voluntary early departure of residents, a temporary measure that resulted in about 100 family members leaving for the States. School enrollment since the fall has plummeted by more than 100 students, leaving about 250 students at the school.

    Also in September, the Air Force suspended the move of U.S. servicemembers’ families to Incirlik, an early signal of the growing concern over violence in the region.

    Incirlik has one of the smallest populations of any U.S. Air Forces in Europe facility, with fewer than 2,000 airmen normally assigned there. Weckerlein said no decisions have been made on the future status of Incirlik as a continued destination for families.

    “They will review this in the future,” she said.

    The evacuation does not signify a permanent decision to end accompanied tours to Turkey, EUCOM said.

    “It is intended to mitigate the risk to DOD elements and personnel, including family members, while ensuring the combat effectiveness of U.S. forces and our mission support to operations in Turkey,” according to the EUCOM statement.

    Still, the long-term prospects for Incirlik as an accompanied destination appear to be in limbo.

    Last week, the Incirlik base commander said during an American Forces Network “commander’s corner” spot that there was nothing official yet regarding changing the status of Incirlik as an accompanied tour for airmen. But, if there were a transition, “it wouldn’t surprise me to see Kunsan-style assignments where everybody is on a one-year remote,” said Col. John Walker, 39th Air Base Wing commander, in the video posted Friday to the base’s Facebook site. He was referring to airmen based in South Korea.

    “So, what’s the future going to look like? I’m really interested in that myself,” he said.

    Uncertainty about the nature of future deployments to the base comes as military operations at Incirlik have increased. Now, the base is on the front lines of the fight against the Islamic State group in Syria and Iraq, with U.S. fighters routinely launching from Incirlik on strike missions.

    In July, U.S. troops and aircraft began rotating through Incirlik in larger numbers as part of the ramping up of the air campaign. At the same time, NATO allies have been conducting operations from Incirlik, including surveillance flights around the Turkish border.

    For the U.S., Incirlik Air Base has long been a strategic spoke for U.S. forces, dating back to the Cold War. While Incirlik has no permanent U.S. aircraft assigned, the base has long served as a temporary hub for cargo and refueling missions supporting U.S. aircraft in places such as Iraq and Afghanistan.

    The base also is only about 200 miles from the Syrian border, where the transit of foreigners back and forth to Turkey has been a long-standing concern for the U.S. and its allies.

    The town of Incirlik, a small village, is about 10 miles from the largely conservative Turkish city of Adana, home to nearly 2 million people.

    NATO's Allied Land Command is based at Izmir and there is a Turkish base at Mugla where some U.S. military personnel go for training and other missions.
    Why didn't I think about copy and pasteing the article here DUH!
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    #38
    Thank you!

    That's so sad! It mean it makes sense they are looking out for everyone's safety, but still
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    #39
    I work at one of the Elementary schools here in Ramstein. One of the options for families with school-aged children is to remain in Germany for the remainder of the school year and be placed in lodging here on base. Our school had a meeting about it today; we will begin to receive students enrolling as early as tomorrow.

    It sucks. Being the waypoint sucks. I'm glad they are doing it for their safety though.
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    #40
    Quote Originally Posted by hockeyprincess13 View Post
    I work at one of the Elementary schools here in Ramstein. One of the options for families with school-aged children is to remain in Germany for the remainder of the school year and be placed in lodging here on base. Our school had a meeting about it today; we will begin to receive students enrolling as early as tomorrow.

    It sucks. Being the waypoint sucks. I'm glad they are doing it for their safety though.
    And there is sufficient base housing ? Or, is this just an option. I assume they can return stateside if they choose?
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