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Thread: Transitioning out of the Rock n Play?

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    #1

    Transitioning out of the Rock n Play?

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    Has anyone had success transitioning out of a rock n play/bassinet/other cosy, nice and confined, sleep device and into a crib?

    Up until now (11.5 weeks old) I've had a GREAT sleeper. He'd go 7-8 hours before waking up for a feed and go right back down again. Lately though, DH and I noticed though that he's getting rather long for the rock n play. He's all scrunched up in the mornings and his head is slumped forward. I wasn't super worried, but then I also felt like I noticed the back of his head becoming more flat because he can't really turn his head to either side to sleep like he can in the crib, so I agreed to try to transition to the crib.

    The first night we tried it was an utter disaster because he was in another room and in the crib and it just sucked. I finally convinced DH to bring the crib into our room where he was used to sleeping. Unfortunately, we're still not getting any sleep. DS just rolls around like a maniac. He kicks his legs, which hit the end of the swaddle, and allows him to shimmy around in the crib. He's also able to usually get at least one if not both arms free. We've tried regular swaddle blanets, the halo sleep sack swaddle thing, and the swaddleme's. The problem is that he's so long and skinny and strong he can always break out.

    The rock n play kept him confined and nice and cosy. I've tried the rolled up towel under the crib sheet to try to mimic the feeling of the rock n play with no luck--DS just kept kicking his feet, hitting the "u" part of the towel, and propelling himself up til his head hit the top of the crib.

    Is there anything else I can try? I'm seriously about to say screw it and put him back in the rock n play.
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    #2
    Kalista slept in the rock and play until she transitioned to a real bed at 13m old.

    The twins are still in theirs at 13m and we are transitioning them to real beds soon.

    My motto is take sleep where you can get it. They are under the weight limit, they stay put (they have each tried to get out on their own, failed, stopped trying.. lol) and they sleep SO SO MUCH BETTER.

    I have heard that doing just naps until they are used to it then starting overnight after that but obviously... no experience here. I don't fix what isn't broken.


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    #3
    Also, sleeping on their backs is what causes the flat headed thing unless there is something else like torticollis going on, not the rock and play specifically. Sullivan has plagiocephaly and we went to the orthopedist about it and got lots of info. The Back to Sleep campaign saw a very large increase in flatheadedness (and a very large decrease in SIDS deaths), and it usually resolves itself when they start sitting up, but you can do positional therapy at home (turn their heads for them) or you can get a noggin nest to help position it.


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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Twinderella View Post
    Kalista slept in the rock and play until she transitioned to a real bed at 13m old.

    The twins are still in theirs at 13m and we are transitioning them to real beds soon.

    My motto is take sleep where you can get it. They are under the weight limit, they stay put (they have each tried to get out on their own, failed, stopped trying.. lol) and they sleep SO SO MUCH BETTER.

    I have heard that doing just naps until they are used to it then starting overnight after that but obviously... no experience here. I don't fix what isn't broken.
    Quote Originally Posted by Twinderella View Post
    Also, sleeping on their backs is what causes the flat headed thing unless there is something else like torticollis going on, not the rock and play specifically. Sullivan has plagiocephaly and we went to the orthopedist about it and got lots of info. The Back to Sleep campaign saw a very large increase in flatheadedness (and a very large decrease in SIDS deaths), and it usually resolves itself when they start sitting up, but you can do positional therapy at home (turn their heads for them) or you can get a noggin nest to help position it.
    I need you to come to my house, lol. I am a FTM and so friggin' paranoid about everything. His pediatrician didn't mention anything about his head at his two month well check but his head just doesn't seem as round as it used to be. Did you use a noggin nest in the rock n play? Nolan has great head control and we do tummy time often. He actually really likes being on his belly usually. He's already rolling from tummy to back (though not regularly--that's part of the constant tummy time, because DH hasn't witnessed it yet ).
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    #5
    I think Trina gave some great advice!

    My kids are belly sleepers, neither likes sleeping on their back (they take after their Momma it seems ). Ariana slept in her rock n' play for the first couple of weeks, and when we tried to transition her, we found she'd only sleep on her belly. That being said, especially as a FTM, I know that the idea of your baby sleeping on their belly can scare the crap out of you


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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by *IGrow'EmXL* View Post
    I think Trina gave some great advice!

    My kids are belly sleepers, neither likes sleeping on their back (they take after their Momma it seems ). Ariana slept in her rock n' play for the first couple of weeks, and when we tried to transition her, we found she'd only sleep on her belly. That being said, especially as a FTM, I know that the idea of your baby sleeping on their belly can scare the crap out of you
    I think Nolan will be a belly sleeper too. I have a gut feeling that the only way he'll sleep in his crib is when he can sleep on his belly. The idea scares the crap out of me, so I'll definitely be putting him down on his back, but once he can roll over both ways on his own I'll put him down on his back and then he will most likely roll and sleep that way all night.

    I think, for my own sanity, he'll go back in the rock n play, at least at night. He gets plenty of tummy time, and when I hold him I try to hold him upright or even wear him. The top of his head from an aerial view looks perfectly round. It's if I look at it from the side that it looks flatter in the back than it used to.
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    #7
    It's perfectly normal for their heads to look a bit flatter in the back as they grow, too. Their heads grow SO MUCH, get flatter as they get longer, and they are so so pliable. You can use the noggin nest in the rock and play, just slide it under the lining so it is secure. We did positional therapy with Sullivan and each day I would move his head a different way when he was sleeping. One it would be to the right, one to the left, one in the middle, rinse and repeat. I put a rolled up receiving blanket under the rock and play lining each night on whatever side (or both for the middle) I wanted to roll his head away from and it worked really well. It just stops their head from being able to fully roll to the side comfortably so they flop it back to the other side while they are sleeping. I personally found it easier to put his head where I wanted it in the rock and play than I did out of it. His head didn't not go back to normal, but it did improve. He really needed a helmet but the insurance wouldn't approve it and we couldn't afford it. His head was wonky from being squished in the womb and his sister pushing his head up against my side with her legs though.


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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Twinderella View Post
    It's perfectly normal for their heads to look a bit flatter in the back as they grow, too. Their heads grow SO MUCH, get flatter as they get longer, and they are so so pliable. You can use the noggin nest in the rock and play, just slide it under the lining so it is secure. We did positional therapy with Sullivan and each day I would move his head a different way when he was sleeping. One it would be to the right, one to the left, one in the middle, rinse and repeat. I put a rolled up receiving blanket under the rock and play lining each night on whatever side (or both for the middle) I wanted to roll his head away from and it worked really well. It just stops their head from being able to fully roll to the side comfortably so they flop it back to the other side while they are sleeping. I personally found it easier to put his head where I wanted it in the rock and play than I did out of it. His head didn't not go back to normal, but it did improve. He really needed a helmet but the insurance wouldn't approve it and we couldn't afford it. His head was wonky from being squished in the womb and his sister pushing his head up against my side with her legs though.
    That's really really good to know. I think i'll try the rolled up receiving blanket trick, just for my piece of mind, until he transitions into the crib. Here's to hopefully getting a good night's sleep!
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by JaneSays View Post
    That's really really good to know. I think i'll try the rolled up receiving blanket trick, just for my piece of mind, until he transitions into the crib. Here's to hopefully getting a good night's sleep!
    GOOD LUCK! There was a period with the twins that I didn't sleep more than 60 minutes at a time for a full 21 days in a row at around 2-3m old or so. It. Was. Hell. Sleep is so much more important to me now than it was before that. I hope you both get a GREAT solid nights sleep!


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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Twinderella View Post
    GOOD LUCK! There was a period with the twins that I didn't sleep more than 60 minutes at a time for a full 21 days in a row at around 2-3m old or so. It. Was. Hell. Sleep is so much more important to me now than it was before that. I hope you both get a GREAT solid nights sleep!
    I can't imagine. Like seriously, I can't imagine. The past three or four nights I've been up ever hour and a half to two hours and I feel like a zombie. He started being fussy and crying today and I just sat there rocking him and crying too. I don't know how you survived...
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