Military Significant Others and Spouse Support - MilitarySOS.com
Page 1 of 5 1234 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 45

Thread: How common are breastfeeding issues?

  1. MilitarySOS Jewel
    Procella's Avatar
    Procella is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    6,983
    #1

    How common are breastfeeding issues?

    Advertisements
    So there is lots of ideas and information out there on how to avoid, work around, improve breastfeeding supply. It has me a bit on edge that at some point I'll have supply issues. Is it really as common as the internet makes it appear? Is it more common to just truck on through breastfeeding without any real issues or do most people have something come up at some point? Am I over thinking this whole thing?

    I started using a shield early on and Ava isn't into weening and I don't have the emotional space to devote the effort at the moment. My midwife has me a bit worried my supply will diminish at some point because of it. She's a champ and is up to 11.3 lbs at 7 weeks.



    Cute baby bonus
  2. Breathe and chill
    *Bazinga*'s Avatar
    *Bazinga* is offline
    Breathe and chill
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    OH/Afghanistan
    Posts
    8,951
    Blog Entries
    1

    #2
    Before 12 weeks is supposedly hormone driven and then it changes to supply and demand...the more she eats, the more milk you make.
    Put on your big girl panties and deal with it like a boss.

  3. Talk Whovian To Me.
    Marcia's Avatar
    Marcia is offline
    Talk Whovian To Me.
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    7,316

    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by *Bazinga* View Post
    Before 12 weeks is supposedly hormone driven and then it changes to supply and demand...the more she eats, the more milk you make.
    I had problems with breastfeeding from day 1, so Landon is strictly formula fed now, but like Bazinga said, the more she's on the boob, the more milk you'll make!
  4. Regular Member
    armychica06's Avatar
    armychica06 is offline
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Washington DC
    Posts
    181

    #4
    My daughter breast fed like a champ until 8 months old. I thought it was going to be easy with my son and it wasn't. He refused to latch, was lazy with the sucking so I ended breastfeeding before he was one month old. If I have any more children, I will definitely try to breast feed but my believe is every baby is different. Some baby's require more work when breast feeding.
  5. Waiting Around
    Mac N Cheese's Avatar
    Mac N Cheese is offline
    Waiting Around
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    26,419
    Blog Entries
    1
    #5
    I deeply believe that if you want to breast feed and don't give yourself any other option you will make it happen. I know some moms will disagree but coming from someone who has volunteered and helped moms I can tell who really want it make it happen and keep on trucking.
    Remember Bf is learned skill for you and baby. Also in the early months feed on demand as much as possible.
    ❤️❤️❤️
    Follow Rylee's progress

  6. Super Speshil
    SoulCupcake's Avatar
    SoulCupcake is offline
    Super Speshil
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The point of no return. Is that a duty station?
    Posts
    9,882
    #6
    Low prolactin levels and insufficient milk transfer caused by latch issues (sometimes due to tongue or lip ties) can affect milk supply.

    My experience:

    Dd1 - I struggled with latch issues for the first week, but we worked through them after that point and nursing was an amazing experience. She was EBF, nursed until 16 months.

    Dd2 - No latch issues, but I dealt with persistent thrush for 10 weeks, but once it cleared (with gentian violet) it was all good. She was EBF and nursed for 16.5 months.

    Ds2 - Latch issues from the start, forced to supplement due to insufficient milk transfer that led to low supply due to his class 2 and 4 tongue ties and labial lip tie. He was eventually declared FTT due to the undiagnosed class 4 tongue tie. I started EPing because he was unable to nurse. The class 4 (posterior) was clipped, along with the labial lip tie, by an ENT, but he still struggled with an uncoordinated suck, so he was unable to nurse efficiently full time. I wanted to nurse, loved nursing, so I had him nurse for night and morning feedings. I continued pumping day feedings until 5.5 months, where I quit pumping, weaned my right side (dysfunctional letdown), and returned him to the breast. I also supplemented because I did not produce a full supply on my left side. It was months of tears, stress, pain, and struggling, but I truly love breastfeeding and was determined to make it work. He made it to 21 months.

    Dd3 - I had anemia-induced low supply from the beginning. I wasn't producing a full supply, and by the time my iron levels improved at 8 weeks postpartum she was exclusively nursing from my left side, which does not produce the 28 oz she takes, so I supplement, like I did with my son. Even with supplementing breastfeeding is going great. She still nurses 7+ times a day.

    I'd say most or a good number will struggle or have to work out the initial latch issues. That takes time and practice. I didn't have latches issues this time. Just supply and letdown (delayed on right side). But it was still uncomfortable at times during the first two weeks. I EBF my first two, and had far fewer struggles, so it isn't always difficult and challenging. There can be many factors that affect breastfeeding success.
    Pax, Aeon
  7. MilitarySOS Jewel
    Procella's Avatar
    Procella is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    6,983
    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by SoulCupcake View Post
    Low prolactin levels and insufficient milk transfer caused by latch issues (sometimes due to tongue or lip ties) can affect milk supply.

    My experience:

    Dd1 - I struggled with latch issues for the first week, but we worked through them after that point and nursing was an amazing experience. She was EBF, nursed until 16 months.

    Dd2 - No latch issues, but I dealt with persistent thrush for 10 weeks, but once it cleared (with gentian violet) it was all good. She was EBF and nursed for 16.5 months.

    Ds2 - Latch issues from the start, forced to supplement due to insufficient milk transfer that led to low supply due to his class 2 and 4 tongue ties and labial lip tie. He was eventually declared FTT due to the undiagnosed class 4 tongue tie. I started EPing because he was unable to nurse. The class 4 (posterior) was clipped, along with the labial lip tie, by an ENT, but he still struggled with an uncoordinated suck, so he was unable to nurse efficiently full time. I wanted to nurse, loved nursing, so I had him nurse for night and morning feedings. I continued pumping day feedings until 5.5 months, where I quit pumping, weaned my right side (dysfunctional letdown), and returned him to the breast. I also supplemented because I did not produce a full supply on my left side. It was months of tears, stress, pain, and struggling, but I truly love breastfeeding and was determined to make it work. He made it to 21 months.

    Dd3 - I had anemia-induced low supply from the beginning. I wasn't producing a full supply, and by the time my iron levels improved at 8 weeks postpartum she was exclusively nursing from my left side, which does not produce the 28 oz she takes, so I supplement, like I did with my son. Even with supplementing breastfeeding is going great. She still nurses 7+ times a day.

    I'd say most or a good number will struggle or have to work out the initial latch issues. That takes time and practice. I didn't have latches issues this time. Just supply and letdown (delayed on right side). But it was still uncomfortable at times during the first two weeks. I EBF my first two, and had far fewer struggles, so it isn't always difficult and challenging. There can be many factors that affect breastfeeding success.
    So to the bold part, so a shield could possibly contribute to production decline at some point then? I just want to be sure I have a bag of tricks ready if its needed rather than be caught off guard.
  8. So lost and wandering.
    Icryinbaseball's Avatar
    Icryinbaseball is offline
    So lost and wandering.
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fort Lewis WA
    Posts
    5,563
    #8
    They aren't as common as you find online. And some problems you find online can be corrected if help is pursued. I know ladies who have breastfed multiple babies for years with out a hitch at all. And there are those who struggle to make it to a year, 6 months, even 6 weeks.

    I had zero luck breastfeeding. I didn't try with #1 for a couple of reasons. Then #2 would not latch, like zero effort put forward. Finally after almost a full day I gave in and gave her a bottle because she had not had anything in several hours. #3 I had the option of breastfeeding or having a much needed surgery. I opted for the surgery, which the doctor wound up not doing right away anyways. I relactated at 4 weeks. He made the effort for about a week and then wanted no part of it because the bottle was easier. With #4 I was bound ot make it work. We started it and she would nurse for hours at a time but still be hungry. She only gained 3oz. in 4 months. We found out after lots of tears and trial that she wasn't getting what she needed from my breastmilk and I was starving my baby basically.
  9. Breathe and chill
    *Bazinga*'s Avatar
    *Bazinga* is offline
    Breathe and chill
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    OH/Afghanistan
    Posts
    8,951
    Blog Entries
    1

    #9
    DD also had a terrible latch. Screamed and was losing weight not kicking her jaundice...I was determined to breast feed...but it was not going well. She was not thriving, no matter how badly I wanted it for us and no matter how many LC's I worked with, BFing was a disaster. I started pumping and had great success with it. DD was a totally different baby. I tried off an on for awhile to get her back on the breast...but it never happened. She is over a year now and has never had anything but breastmilk.

    Bottom line, you do what you need to do to feed your baby and just know that no matter the route, you're doing the best you can
    Put on your big girl panties and deal with it like a boss.

  10. aka Milfon2Wheelz
    BraveLilToaster's Avatar
    BraveLilToaster is offline
    aka Milfon2Wheelz
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kings Bay Ga
    Posts
    10,109


    #10
    It varies person to person, some women never have supply issues and seem to have 1000oz of frozen milk on hand at all times. Other women struggle with not producing enough. The same woman can have tons of issues with kid number one and not a problem at all with kid number two. The biggest thing to remember is to stay hydrated!


    Quote Originally Posted by Mac N Cheese View Post
    I deeply believe that if you want to breast feed and don't give yourself any other option you will make it happen. I know some moms will disagree but coming from someone who has volunteered and helped moms I can tell who really want it make it happen and keep on trucking.
    Remember Bf is learned skill for you and baby. Also in the early months feed on demand as much as possible.

    It's propaganda shit like the first bolded that makes mothers feel so shitty and like a failure if breastfeeding DOESN'T work for them. No you can't just want it hard enough, sometimes it just won't happen. The second bolded is offensive as fuck, even more so knowing you're a volunteer that works with lactating mothers. So you can tell who REALLY wants to make it happen vs the ones that...what? Don't care as much? Don't want it to happen? Don't meet your standards of trying hard enough?

    You know I like you Mac but holy shit your post was full of bullshit and guilt trips. Shit like that is the LAST thing women who are struggling need to hear. Because you're saying it is EXCLUSIVELY THEIR FAULT for breastfeeding not working, you're eliminating any medical problems or anything like that and putting it all on the woman who just didn't want hard enough. That is like telling a woman that can't get pregnant that if she just wants hard enough she'll get pregnant, if she doesn't get pregnant....well she just didn't REALLY want it and kept trucking, right?
Page 1 of 5 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •