Military Significant Others and Spouse Support - MilitarySOS.com
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Birth story.

  1. Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Phoenixx.'s Avatar
    Phoenixx. is offline
    Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    2,073

    #1

    Suspicious Birth story.

    Advertisements
    [psych. No birth story in here lol]

    Guys. Emmaleigh's birth story is....

    7 pages long. Roughly.


    I was going to post it here but it is ridiculously long so I just decided to share how ridiculously long it is!

    Dont hate me for not posting it! Pleeeaaaasssseeeee



  2. Senior Member
    kaaau's Avatar
    kaaau is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    5,818
    #2
    Ummmmmm that doesn't help........................ :-(
    http://militarysos.com/forum/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=8121&dateline=1213248817 TAKEN AT NISQUALLY WILDLIFE PRESERVE
  3. Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Phoenixx.'s Avatar
    Phoenixx. is offline
    Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    2,073

    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by kaaau View Post
    Ummmmmm that doesn't help........................ :-(
    Wanna know a secret? In posting this I was hoping someone would tell me to post it even though it is ridiculously long



  4. Senior Member
    kaaau's Avatar
    kaaau is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    5,818
    #4
    Soooooooooo.........................post it even if it ridiculously long LOL
    http://militarysos.com/forum/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=8121&dateline=1213248817 TAKEN AT NISQUALLY WILDLIFE PRESERVE
  5. I've got 32 flavors of that bootylicious bubblegum.
    rayfinkle's Avatar
    rayfinkle is offline
    I've got 32 flavors of that bootylicious bubblegum.
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    18,538
    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by megan_laine View Post
    Wanna know a secret? In posting this I was hoping someone would tell me to post it even though it is ridiculously long
    So post it?


    life's a party, rock your body
  6. Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Phoenixx.'s Avatar
    Phoenixx. is offline
    Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    2,073

    #6
    I wrote it like this so she could know what all happened even if (God forbid) Im not here when she wants to know.

    Soooo... here it is. Remember... its seven-ish pages long.



    I’m starting this early, but I have no idea how long it will take me to remember everything (if I even can), and put it all into words. It is all very emotional and the love I feel for her overwhelms me sometimes, which makes it even harder to write about how difficult the days leading to her birth were.
    Before I tell the story of the three-day-long process that brought us Miss Emmaleigh, first I have to tell you a little about the pregnancy. The day I found out I was pregnant, I was at work. My husband was away at basic training. It was one of the most exciting and terrifying days of my life. I had had symptoms for several days, and even though I found out very early, at 3 weeks and 3 days, I had already started to feel exhausted and emotional. I like to say that the day I found out, was the first day of my “mommy instinct”. On my lunch break at work, I decided, spur-of-the-moment to go to Walmart and buy a pregnancy test. I took it before my break ended and saw what I assumed was a faulty test. But, my gut was telling me otherwise. My gut was saying “That is a positive!!” but my brain was saying that I was seeing things or that the faint little pink line wasn’t really there.

    So, I went back to work and decided I would take another a few days later if I was still feeling symptoms. Needless to say I didn’t make it past midnight that night. The line was the same, but I was hopeful.

    Within five days, I had taken about 10 pregnancy tests, including a digital one that finally made it seem like it was real. I called my OB and made an appointment for around 8 weeks. It seemed too long to wait, but I knew I could because it was such great news for me.
    Two weeks passed, and I was beginning to spread the news to closest friends and family.

    Then one day I woke up and went to the bathroom. I saw a color that I wasn’t expecting to see for about nine and a half months. Immediately, I called my OB and explained. They had me come in to be checked. I was around 5 weeks at this point. When I went in, my blood work showed that I had a low progesterone level, which could be causing the spotting. The doctor did an ultrasound and showed a yolk sac (she was so tiny!) and that otherwise, the pregnancy was healthy and progressing well.
    I started taking the prescribed medicine and went back several times for blood draws. Eventually things evened out and the numbers began to increase the way the doctor wanted them to, and things started to really look better.

    A few weeks later, I went back for another ultrasound. I got to finally hear my little angel’s heartbeat. That was a very emotional moment for me, as her father could not be there. Deep down though, I felt lucky to have that moment to myself. Just me, the little angel, and the ultrasound technician.
    The pregnancy continued to progress and I was more in love each day. In one of the letters I exchanged with Dakota, we discussed names. It was almost ridiculous how easily her name came to me, and just as easily, he agreed and liked it as well. So we had a girl name picked out, but struggled over a boy name. We decided we would come up with a boy’s name when the time came, if we needed it.

    About three months into the pregnancy, I received a letter from my husband that really changed things. We were moving to Alaska. That’s three thousand miles from home, and almost every aspect of our lives would change. But, we embraced it and moved on. At 15 weeks, just before the moving process began, I had an appointment scheduled. It was the first appointment scheduled without an ultrasound. But when I went in, I begged the doctor to let me have one more ultrasound since I didn’t know when I would be able to get to a doctor again. She was happy to do it and excited to share the moment with us. Dakota’s mom was there with me when we found out the little angel was a girl! I had a feeling the whole time, but I was so glad to see my feeling confirmed.

    At the end of April we began the process of having our things packed and I moved to live with my grandma for two weeks until I got a plane ticket to Alaska.
    The next time I went to a doctor’s appointment I was 24 weeks pregnant. It was scary not getting seen, but because of so many different circumstances when I arrived in Alaska, that was the soonest it was possible.

    At that first appointment at the hospital, I had a high blood pressure. This was very unusual for me, but it was chalked up to stress and anxiety over a new doctor and a new home. We monitored baby girl for about an hour and discovered that not only was she fine, but she was doing great. Moving around a ton and had a great heartbeat and accelerations. So they sent us home and we scheduled another appointment for a month later.

    Before the end of two weeks, I started having a sharp pain in my upper stomach. It hurt to breathe, so we decided to head to labor and delivery to get checked out and make sure everything was okay. It turns out, since Miss Emmaleigh was growing so quickly and was measuring almost two full weeks ahead, she had pushed my organs up high into my abdomen and something was pushing against one of my ribs. The doctor said there was nothing they could do about it, and that I would just have to wait it out. I was fine with that as long as my baby girl was okay!

    At the next regular appointment, I had high blood pressure again. Sadly, this lead to a diagnosis of Gestational Hypertension, which meant that I would be watched much closer and we would have to induce labor if baby girl didn’t come on her own before 39 weeks. This was troubling, and I fought with myself over the diagnosis, thinking that if I had done something differently either before or during pregnancy, I might not have this issue, which made my pregnancy high risk. Eventually, I got my head around the fact that it just happens sometimes and there was nothing I could have done to change it. I received that diagnosis at 28 weeks. At that point, I began having an appointment every other week, and had two Non-Stress Tests every week where I got to listen to baby girl on the monitor to make sure she was doing okay. A majority of the NST’s I went to ended in labor in delivery because baby girl was so active that it was hard to get a solid twenty minutes of her heart rate on the monitor. She kept moving away from it!
    This process continued until the day we delivered. We picked an induction date and got more excited with every day. Finally, the day had come. We picked September 16th to begin the induction process. On that day, I was 38 weeks and 1 day pregnant, and we were extremely excited to head to the hospital. We arrived at six a.m. and began getting ready. They put in an IV and asked me all kinds of questions. Once I was completely dressed in their gown, in bed, had the IV, had some blood drawn, and had answered all of their questions, a provider came in to help us decide on a plan for the induction.

    We have finally reached the actual “birth story” part of this. At Bassett, in the labor and delivery unit, there are two, 12-hour shifts. Shifts change at 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Midwives are the providers during the day, and the doctors are there at night. Just for reference.

    At 7:45 a.m., a midwife came in and discussed our plan for the induction. We decided together that we wanted to avoid the use of Pitocin until it was absolutely necessary, and Dakota and I made it clear that we also wanted to avoid having a c-section unless absolutely necessary. The midwife was in agreement with this, and decided, based on my cervix (which was only at a dilation of 1 and 30% effaced) that we would use Cytotec to help ripen my cervix. The first pill was place at 7:45 and we were told to just hang out and try to rest as much as possible. At this point they also told me that I was no longer allowed to eat anything, only clear liquids from now on. She also told me to be prepared for a long journey. Inductions can take days and I should be prepared for a long process.
    The Cytotec not only helped my cervix but also started contractions. I began having regular contractions, and continued to contract even after the Cytotec wore off. Because of the contractions that I was having, they were not able to give me another Cytotec pill. We decided to let my body try to do it on it’s own before adding any more interventions. I continued to contract regularly for another couple of hours.

    Around 6:45 p.m. my contractions had lessened in strength and were not coming near as often. The midwife came back in and rechecked me. I had only progressed to a dilation of 2 after nearly 12 hours of regular contractions. So the midwife and I had a conversation about the next steps and it was decided that she would place a Foley Balloon, or sometimes called a Foley Bulb. The way a Foley Bulb works is by placing it through the cervix opening and filling it with water. There are two “bulb” portions, directly surrounding the cervix. The idea is that the pressure from the water will help the cervix soften and dilate to at least 4 or 5 centimeters.
    This is where this story starts to bring back painful memories. Early on in the pregnancy, I had decided I wanted to try and labor without pain medication, at least as long as I could.

    The midwife who was working with me had a student with her. I loved both of them, and they were great throughout the entire day. I had also seen the student several times before during my many trips to labor and delivery, and had established a medical relationship with her. Very kind, friendly women. I am glad that I got the chance to have them as providers during part of labor.

    The midwife and student left and returned a few minutes later with a lot of equipment. Because she had a student with her, the midwife had the student try first. She talked me through the process, and explained that they inserted the speculum, and then “threaded” the foley through my cervix. Once in place it would be filled with water. At least, that is how it is supposed to work. My husband does not do well with medical procedures and stepped out of the room. I am glad he did so, because within a few minutes, my room looked like a horror movie. There were lights shining and blood was everywhere. Enough of it that we had to change some of my bedding.

    Apparently, my cervix was not cooperating. It was too high and thick for the Foley to go in with the speculum. So the next step is for the person inserting it to use their fingers to try and place it. The student attempted this, but again my cervix was too high for the student to feel comfortable. So the midwife stepped in. She tried to place the Foley with her fingers as well, but after about five minutes, knew that it wasn’t going to happen that way. She told me to prepare myself for a lot of pressure as she was going to have to insert her whole hand to place the Foley bulb. She was right. There was a lot of pressure.

    There was also a lot of pain. I may be a bit of a wimp in some ways, but in others, I am very good at handling pain. It took about five or so minutes (I think, but I was a little too occupied to keep track of time) for her to place it. These five minutes were the start of the most excruciating hour of my life. I have never felt such pain. Once the midwife removed her hand, some of the pressure went away. Things still felt strange, but I could handle it. Little did I know what was in store. They had not filled the bulb with water yet. As they filled it, I was suddenly in pain again. This time, it was even worse. The nurse, student, and midwife kept telling me over and over how good I was doing. You would think, with the way they were talking, that I was having the baby right there! But, alas, I wasn’t. That was still a long way off, even though I hoped it would be soon.
    Once everything was cleaned up, and the room was back to normal, I was starting to really hurt. My husband came back, saw the look on my face, and knew I was in more pain than I had ever been in in my life. This lasted for about an hour. He was sitting next to me, holding my hand, and kept telling me to ask for something. I kept wanting to push it out as long as I could. I felt like I could handle it. But I was wrong. Within an hour, there was no comfortable position, and I was writhing on the bed from the pain and the pressure. I felt like I was exploding from the inside out. See, the thing about the Foley bulb is that it forces the cervix open. It does this rather quickly. It does 75% of its job within about two hours, and then can take up to six hours to finish it.

    Finally, I caved. I called, in tears, feeling sick to my stomach from pain, asking for medicine. They brought me some Stadol. As soon as that medicine started through my IV, the pain began to fade away and it was amazing. Soon after, I fell asleep. I was in a drug-induced haze for about 6 hours. I slept through most of it. When nurses came in to check on me, I woke up only for the few minutes they were in the room, and then I fell back asleep.

    When the medicine began to wear off, I felt like I had to go to the bathroom every five minutes. This was a process because of the IV attached to me, the Foley attachment coming out of me, and the blood pressure cuff that had to be taken off and put back on every time I got out of bed.

    Dakota and I joked that the bathroom at the hospital was a time warp. I would go in and think I was in there for two or three minutes, and would come back out to a nurse asking if I was okay because I had been in there for ten or fifteen. Looking back, I think it was my subconscious making me take my time just so I could be out of the bed.
    At some point during the night, the provider came in to tell me that my contractions had pretty much stopped. It was time to start Pitocin. For the life of me, I cannot remember who the provider was Monday night. The night was such a blur from the pain and medicine that it all kind of flew by. Around 2 a.m., the Foley bulb came out. This meant that I was dilated to somewhere around 4-5 centimeters and I felt like we were making progress. I could feel her starting to move down.

    Tuesday morning is pretty foggy in my mind. I remember that they kept pumping Pitocin, increasing it regularly. I think it was Tuesday that Dakota and I played a game of Monopoly, or started one. But around 2 p.m. they had me at 20 on the Pitocin. I have no idea what that means, but the max they could do on me was 30. If I remember right, around this time I was at 5 centimeters dilation and around 70% effaced (I think). The midwife on staff that day decided it was time to break my water. Things were really moving (at least I thought they were). The deciding factor for breaking my water was that the baby wasn’t staying on the monitor very well, and the contraction monitor wasn’t able to show how strong my contractions were. So, they broke my water and placed the two monitors. One just under the skin of Emmaleigh’s head (she still has the scab from it 8 days later) and a contraction monitor.

    Breaking my water made the contractions painful, very very quickly. I knew within about 30 minutes that there was no way I was doing this without an epidural. So, I asked. The anesthesiologist had just left half an hour ago, so it took about half an hour for him to get back. That half hour was pretty painful, but still nothing compared to the Foley bulb incident. However, I was so over being in pain that I was relieved to ask for it, even if it was not what I originally wanted.
    When the anesthesiologist arrived, he prepped me and began the process of placing the epidural catheter. This was difficult. I had to hold completely still through a contraction and not move while he placed it. It was difficult, but not impossible. It took about 10 minutes and the catheter was in. I felt some relief almost immediately. But I was under the impression that epidurals pretty much removed the pain entirely. So I was a little confused as to why I was still in enough pain to not want to talk. I told this to the doctor and he explained that there would still be a little bit of pain. But, this was more than a little bit. He tested how well I could feel things with a glove filled with ice. It was obvious that it had taken much better on the right side than the left, but still not even very well on the right side.

    During the whole process of getting an epidural, they take your blood pressure every three minutes to make sure that it doesn’t drop too low. Well, mine did the opposite. It skyrocketed. The high point was somewhere in the 160’s over 90’s. I felt nauseous and within a few minutes was vomiting. That was when I knew something hadn’t worked. The doctor felt the same way and we decided to re-do the catheter. It was easier to sit through the process, though, because of the little bit of medicine that had worked. As soon as he started pumping the medicine I felt infinitely better. No nausea, and my blood pressure was dropping. It dropped a little low, but they were happy with it. I was able to talk again and the doctor was happy with my pain level (which was a zero once the medicine was in full swing). The process was over around 5:30 p.m. I believe.
    The rest of the night is still a little foggy. Around 8 p.m. I started to feel a lot of pressure. But when the doctor checked me, I was only at 6 cm. They decided, since I had been on the max dose of Pitocin for several hours that they would do Pitocin rest for about an hour. My contractions stopped almost immediately. But it was nice to get a little rest. Around 4:30 a.m. the doctor basically told me that, if at any point, she came in to check me and I hadn’t made progress, we would have to go to the operating room for a c-section. She knew how much I wanted to avoid this. Emmaleigh’s head was bulging through my cervix, but I wasn’t dilating fast enough.

    They put the Pitocin on 20 again and we waited. But not for long. About an hour later, the doctor came back to check me. I had gone from 6/7 cm and 75% effaced to 8 cm and completely effaced. So something was working! She gave me two hours and came back to check again. I was at 9 cm and I was feeling a lot of pressure. The doctor who had been with me all night had been my doctor for appointments for the last month. She was just as adamant about my having a vaginal delivery as I was. She left for the day and it made me sad to know that she wouldn’t be here, but I knew that she was excited for me. The midwife that came in was the first provider I saw at the hospital, before my pregnancy was labeled high risk.

    Around 8 a.m. the midwife checked again. I was still at 9 c.m., and Emmaleigh was at a +1 station which meant she was moving down into place to come out. But they wanted me to be a full 10 cm and have her at +2 before I could push.

    By 8:30, my body was done. It was ready to do this whether or not the midwife was. I was on my side and could no longer speak from the strength of the contractions. I felt like I had to go to the bathroom so bad, and I knew that meant she was coming. The doctor checked me and I was still at 9cm, and she was still at +1. But when I had a contraction and pushed, my cervix finished dilating with each push, and the midwife could tell that they weren’t going to wait. She considered my cervix complete and we got ready to push. Around 9:15, I was on my back and had my legs in stirrups. This was finally happening. It was almost as though they didn’t even need to guide me in pushing. I could feel the contractions and pushed right along with them. About 40 minutes (roughly… I think) into pushing, Emmaleigh was crowning. But her heart rate dropped into the 80’s. The midwife had me roll onto my side and they put oxygen on me. Her heart rate came back up, but they decided I needed to get her out. There was no more time. She needed to get here. The doctor from the night before walked in. She (apparently, even though I didn’t see it) dropped forceps on the bed and was there to help however was needed. (I later learned from the night nurse that when she got off at 7 a.m., she stayed and waited. According to the nurse, the doctor said that “If anyone is going to have to cut her open, it is going to be me. I’ve been with her this far.” As weird as this sounds, it made me feel really special to know that my doctor, who was 36 weeks pregnant herself, stayed and waited on Emmaleigh to arrive.)

    Within 3 contractions, she was.
    At 10:06 a.m., with a little under an hour of pushing, Emmaleigh Grace made her appearance. We had been at the hospital for 54 hours, and I had been in active labor for 15 and a half hours. She was laid on my chest and made a few little noises. She didn’t even really cry. She cried for about a minute, but once the towel was on her and I was rubbing her with it to wipe her off, she settled down. I had her on my chest for a few minutes, but they took her to clean her up and get her ready for the world.
    Then, there was more fun. My placenta wasn’t coming out. They told me it had to be out within 30 minutes before they had to take me to the operating room and surgically remove it. I was not having that. No way did I make it this far and have my baby vaginally after all of that trouble only to have to have surgery anyway.
    The doctor agreed. And then, there was another hand inside of me. Thankfully, this time I had the epidural. I laughed because one of the nurses showed me just how far Dr. Sheridan’s hand was inside of me, and it was about to her elbow. It was weird to have something going in after my eight pound baby had just come out. Finally, after she dug around in there and I pushed a little more, the placenta came out.

    Just in time, too, because Emmaleigh was cleaned up and ready for me to hold her. She was 8 pounds 2 ounces of perfection.

    And here we are, 8 days later, and she is the center of my world.



  7. Senior Member
    maegan's Avatar
    maegan is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Fort Campbell
    Posts
    13,456
    #7
    I'm so glad that after going through all of that you got to have her the way you (semi) wanted and you are both doing well!
  8. Breathe and chill
    *Bazinga*'s Avatar
    *Bazinga* is offline
    Breathe and chill
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    OH/Afghanistan
    Posts
    8,951
    Blog Entries
    1

    #8
    that is an awesome birth story. Thanks, I teared up when the doctor stayed and waited with you
    Put on your big girl panties and deal with it like a boss.

  9. Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Phoenixx.'s Avatar
    Phoenixx. is offline
    Sometimes the best gifts come in the smallest packages.
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    2,073

    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by maegan View Post
    I'm so glad that after going through all of that you got to have her the way you (semi) wanted and you are both doing well!
    Even with all of the hurdles we had to jump, it was perfect.

    Quote Originally Posted by *Bazinga* View Post
    that is an awesome birth story. Thanks, I teared up when the doctor stayed and waited with you
    I cried when I wrote it!



  10. Senior Member
    kaaau's Avatar
    kaaau is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    5,818
    #10
    Great story, thanks for sharing!!
    http://militarysos.com/forum/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=8121&dateline=1213248817 TAKEN AT NISQUALLY WILDLIFE PRESERVE
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •