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Thread: BF questions.

  1. Señor Member
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    #1

    BF questions.

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    My mother will be here to help me with the baby, but she's never breast fed, so I'm sure she won't be very helpful in the feeding department Sooooo... I must ask the all knowing MSOS BF mommas...

    1. How often do you burp while breast feeding?

    2. Do you feed on both sides each feeding, or alternate with each feeding? If you alternate, how do you know when to switch sides?

    3. When should I start pumping? I plan on pumping to help my supply as well as have a supply built up for DH to help feed once she is 6 weeks, if that matters.

    4. Did you feed on a schedule from the start, or let him/her dictate at first and then set a schedule? When did you start a schedule if you didn't do so off the bat?


    TIA

    be cool.
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    #2
    1. I burped in between sides when I switched otherwise after he was done. He wasn't a gassy baby at all (now he is, though, and he thinks it's funny)

    2. I started out feeding on both sides but within a month, my supply ended up so that one boob per feeding worked for us and I didn't get engorged or anything. You can tell when the baby is no longer swallowing and just sucking. That was when I would burp and switch sides. Basically, they start out sucking kinda shallow, quick sucks. Once the milk is actually coming out, they're long, deep, drawn out sucks and you can hear/see them swallowing. Once the milk stops flowing, it's back to quick sucks. Doesn't mean you've run out, just that's the pattern.

    3. I didn't pump a lot. I only ever pumped about a week prior to when I would need the supply. I didn't start pumping for the first time until he was 2mos old. I'll be waiting until the next one is 2mos old, too, before I introduce pumping. Until then, you'll still be waiting for your supply to even out and match with your baby's needs. Pumping could make you uncomfortable and your supply all sorts of wonky.

    4. I fed completely on demand whole time I was BF'ing (about 11mos when he quit). BF'ing is really meant to be an on-demand type of thing. Plus, it will be very hard to have any sort of schedule with BF'ing for the first few months since she'll be having growth spurts and your supply will be trying to even itself out.

    Hope this helps!!
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    #3
    1. Depends on the kid. Some need burped after each side or once they detach. Some wont burp. Naomi has never been a big burper.

    2. Depends on your let down. Start with one side. Burp and switch. If you notice the baby gagging you may have over active let down. Allow baby to start to nurse pull off drip into a towel then continue to nurse. The milk won't be so forceful and will prevent spitting up. Normally a baby will cue to switch sides. If you are over active you may need (when older) to pump first then nurse.

    3. Start in 3/5 weeks once you have a good breast feeding relationship and you know th latch and milk is going well. If you are overly engorged though and know you supply is fine you can do what I did and pump for ten min prior to feedings.

    4. I have always nursed on demand. Never had a schedule as their needs change.
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    #4
    Well, I don't have kids, BUT I'm in OB/Peds clinical this semester in nursing school. I'm going to type you out exactly what's in our OB book, but you don't have to listen to me since I don't have kids. this is really more for my benefit because I have a test on it Monday morning!

    1. Frequency of feedings: Newborns need to breastfeed at least 8-12 times in a 24 hour period. Some infants will breastfeed every 2-3 hours and others may cluster-feed every hour or so for 3-5 feedings and then sleep for 3-4 hours between clusters. Parents should awaken their baby to feed at night at least every 3 hours during the day and 4 hours during the night. Once the infant is feeding well and gaining weight adequately, going to demand feeding is appropriate, although the infant should still receive at least 8 feedings in 24 hours.

    2. Duration of feedings: The duration of feedings can be highly variable because of the timing of milk transfer. The average time for early feedings is 30-40 minutes or approximately 15-20 minutes per breast. As infants grow and become more efficient at breastfeeding the length of feeding time decreases. Some mother's prefer one-sided nursing and only use one breast every feeding. The baby is the ultimate in determining when he is done feeding, the baby's sucking/swallowing pattern will slow, the breast softens, and the baby may fall asleep or release the nipple. If the baby seems to be feeding effectively and the urine output is adequate but the weight gain is not satisfactory, the mother may be switching to the second breast too soon.

    *My book doesn't discuss burping with breast feeding at all, only with formula feeding and it suggests at the end of the feeding.

    I hope this helped. Like I said, I have an entire OB book to memorize so if nothing else it helped me!

    3. Pumping: For most women, recommendations are to initiate pumping only after the milk supply is well-established and the infant is latching and breastfeeding well. However, when breastfeeding is delayed after birth do to circumstances, the mother should begin pumping as soon as possible. Some women prefer to pump in the mornings upon awakening or after feedings. Others choose to pump one breast while the infant feeds on the other breast. Double pumping saves time and can stimulate the milk supply more effectively than single pumping.
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh, Baby♥ View Post
    My mother will be here to help me with the baby, but she's never breast fed, so I'm sure she won't be very helpful in the feeding department Sooooo... I must ask the all knowing MSOS BF mommas...

    1. How often do you burp while breast feeding?

    2. Do you feed on both sides each feeding, or alternate with each feeding? If you alternate, how do you know when to switch sides?

    3. When should I start pumping? I plan on pumping to help my supply as well as have a supply built up for DH to help feed once she is 6 weeks, if that matters.

    4. Did you feed on a schedule from the start, or let him/her dictate at first and then set a schedule? When did you start a schedule if you didn't do so off the bat?


    TIA
    I burp him when he unlatches. He spits up often, so whether it be between feedings (alternating breasts), or if he is finished- I burp him.

    I nurse him on both sides, every time. I alternate which side he eats on first. (say at 10am he begins nursing on the right side and transitions to the left, then at 12, he begins on the left side.)

    I began pumping once my milk came in.

    I nurse on demand. Babies go through many growth spurts within the first few weeks, so it's hard to keep them on a schedule.

    I hope it comes easy for you!!
  6. Señor Member
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    #6
    Thanks for the input ladies

    be cool.
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    #7
    1. I burped my DD a few time while feeding because she had reflux and it made it easier fo her to keep it down.

    2. I switched whenever I couldn't get anymore out of one breast.

    3. I started pumping as soon as I could

    4. At first I let her eat on demand but she had reflux and colic so putting her on a schedule helped a lot. She was so backwards and literally staye dup and cried all night and didn't want to eat much at night. Her doctor reccomended putting her on a schedule and that's when things began to get easier.
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh, Baby♥ View Post

    1. How often do you burp while breast feeding?
    I didn't. None of mine were ever burped. At least, I didn't make a conscious decision to burp them in between or post feedings. The majority of breast-fed babies don't need to be burped. They don't take in air like bottled-fed babies.

    2. Do you feed on both sides each feeding, or alternate with each feeding? If you alternate, how do you know when to switch sides?
    In the first couple weeks to establish my supply, yes. I offered both sides, but they didn't always nurse from both in one feeding. After they settled into a routine, say, after a few weeks, it was normally just one side per feeding. It's important to make sure babe gets both foremilk and plenty of hindmilk (fatty milk). Sometimes it's best to just keep babe on one breast because you could end up with a foremilk/hindmilk imbalance where babe is getting more foremilk than the fatty hindmilk, which comes at the end of a feeding. So "emptying" one breast is sometimes best.

    3. When should I start pumping? I plan on pumping to help my supply as well as have a supply built up for DH to help feed once she is 6 weeks, if that matters.
    Up to you. If you don't need help with your supply you don't really need to pump. Pumping could just create an oversupply, and if you're primarily feeding babe from the tap, that can pose an issue. It's one thing if one is pumping long term and needs to create a stash, therefore keeping and maintaining a certain output, but babes that get it from the tap can't keep up with the demand -- what they take and what you pump.

    If you just want to supplement a feeding or two, pump maybe once or twice a day once breastfeeding has been established and there are no kinks to iron out (latch issues, specifically). Just a heads up, some EBF babies do not accept bottles. My oldest absolutely refused a bottle when I introduced it at 7 weeks. I had over 100 ounces saved up, too. She did, however, take a straw sippy at 4.5 months. Some EBF babies are very picky when it comes to bottles/nipples.

    4. Did you feed on a schedule from the start, or let him/her dictate at first and then set a schedule? When did you start a schedule if you didn't do so off the bat?
    Completely on demand. I've never done feeding schedules. They nursed whenever they were hungry or just wanted to nurse. Both girls had GER, though dd1's was very severe, to the point where she nursed every hour to make up what she lost when she threw up (I'm talking 3-4 ounces at a time). Every 60-90 minutes was the norm for her until she hit about 7 months. Dd2 nursed about every 90 minutes to two hours. It just varied. Ds2 also nursed very frequently due to the struggles we had with latch, suck, tongue tie and my supply.
    Pax, Aeon
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    #9
    1. I have a really fast let down, so when I notice him gulping faster and faster and faster, I'll burp him. Otherwise he will spit it all up later.

    2. Originally, I started offering both sides at feedings. But after a couple weeks he was super fussy, had lots of painful gas, and had 8 or 9 liquid, vinegary poops a DAY. I finally figured out that he had the fore/hindmilk imbalance Lux was talking about, so now he gets one side per feeding/2 hours. Like, if he eats off the left at 10 am and decides he wants to eat again at 11:30 am, he gets the left boob again. If he decides to eat again at noon, he gets the right boob.

    3. I actually started pumping before he started breastfeeding. Since he was hooked up to a glucose IV, he didn't get hungry until he was 48 hours old. I pump everyday since I have class, and he gets a bottle while I'm gone. I also like having a stash in case I want to go out and have a few drinks.

    4. We feed purely on demand. Usually it is every 2 1/2-3 hours. We have a schedule, but it is one he created. While we were at the hospital, the day nurses really pushed for scheduled feedings, and forced me to try nursing every 2 hours, but it didn't work since he wasn't hungry. Scheduled feedings can actually lower your supply as well.
  10. Señor Member
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    #10
    thank you ladiess

    be cool.
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