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Thread: Baby Blues

  1. ♡1 Peter 4:8 ♡
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    #1

    Question Baby Blues

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    Did you get them? If so, when did they first come up? When did they finally go away? Did they get better/worse before disappearing completely? How did you know it was just baby blues and not actual PPD?

    Any insight is totally appreciated. Thanks in advance!


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    #2
    What's the difference between baby blues and PPD?
  3. ♡1 Peter 4:8 ♡
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    #3
    Baby blues are not serious, don't last, and go away on their own. PPD is longer lasting and often needs treatment, according to almost everything I've read. I don't actually really know completely...


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    #4
    Oh. I never really felt down or depressed. Tired and frustrated at times yes but nothing to serious. But I also have a really easy baby!
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    #5
    Yeah, my baby is pretty easy too. Lucky us! I don't have any like crazy thoughts about harming myself/my child or anything, but my hormones still seem TOTALLY out of whack. I feel like its gotten worse since giving birth, not better and I really don't think that is normal. I guess I'll ask my doctor at my 6week check up.
    Last edited by KaityBug; 04-18-2012 at 01:04 AM.


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    #6
    I think i may of had baby blues, but i was also recovering from c section so i was really tired and sore and miserable. I felt guilt for leaving the baby or not being able to do enough but other than that it took me about two weeks or so to get myself together!
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    #7
    I definitely had some sort of baby blues but I didn't recognize I had it until months later. I was so angry all the time and frustrated and cried a lot mostly because of that anger and frustration not sadness or depression. AND I was so resentful of dh!!! For no real reason either, I told him that too I told him "look I don't know what's going on but I am really mad at you because you don't have to do everything I do and then you try to help and for some reason that makes me even more mad!! Sooooo sorry in advance!" It took I say 2-3 months for my feelings to level out .
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    #8
    I have dealt with ppd in the past couple of weeks, I already had depression and anxiety before Peyton and when she wasn't gaining weight and I wasn't producing enough milk I completely blamed myself and my depression got worse. I think I noticed a difference between ppd and baby blues because with bb it was closer to when I brought her home, I was exhausted and just sobbed on and off. No particular reason, and I was resentful of my dh Bc I was doing all the work and I was frustrated with my body. That passed though. With my ppd I felt so hopeless and lonely and ppl only cared about the baby and I constantly doubted what I was doing. I thought I was a terrible mother although I have the easiest annd happiest baby. I got a stronger prescription for my antidepressant and started seeing my therapist again and I feel 100% better!
  9. Luke 6:37 & Matthew 7:1-2
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    #9
    There is a big difference.. Baby Blue ONLY happen with in the first couple weeks.
    If it happens later it is not baby blues.

    How often do women experience the “baby blues”?
    Approximately 70-80% of all new mothers experience some negative feelings or mood swings after the birth of their child.

    When do the “baby blues” occur?
    Often the symptoms of “baby blues” will hit forcefully within four to five days after the birth of the baby, although depending on how the birth of the baby went, they be noticeable earlier.
    Baby Blues : American Pregnancy Association

    What are the “Baby Blues”?
    What are the “Baby Blues”?
    The “baby blues” are the least severe form of postpartum depression. Approximately 50% to 75% of all new mothers will experience some negative feelings after giving birth. Normally these feelings occur suddenly four to five days after the birth of the baby. The most common symptoms include:

    Crying for no apparent reason
    Mood swings with irritability and anxiousness
    Feel overwhelmed
    Change in eating and sleeping
    While these symptoms are quite unpleasant, they typically resolve on their own within a week to two weeks. Getting as much rest as possible and having a good support system can help these symptoms seem less severe.
    What is Postpartum Depression (PPD)?
    What is Postpartum Depression (PPD)?
    Approximately 15% of new mothers will experience what is classified as postpartum depression (PPD). Symptoms may occur a few days after delivery or sometimes as late as a year later. Women who experience postpartum depression will have alternating good days and bad days. Symptoms can be mild or severe, usually lasting for over 2 weeks. A few of the symptoms include:

    Fatigue
    Feelings of sadness, hopeless and overwhelmed
    Trouble sleeping and eating
    Feelings of guilt and being worthless
    Loosing interest in things that you used to enjoy
    Withdrawing from family and friends
    No interest in the baby
    Thoughts of hurting yourself or your baby
    Because postpartum depression can range in severity, its very important than any woman experiencing these symptoms talk with her health care provider. Treatmeant may range from therapy to medication.
    What is Postpartum Anxiety (PPA)?
    What is Postpartum Anxiety (PPA)?
    Postpartum anxiety affects about 10% of postpartum women. These women may experience anxiety alone or may also experience depression with the anxiety. Postpartum anxiety can also include postpartum panic disorder which includes having panic attacks along with feelings of anxiety. Symptoms include:

    Changes in eating and sleeping
    Racing thoughts that you can't get control of
    Constant worry
    Impending fear that something bad is going to happen
    Trouble with sitting still and focusing
    Physical symptoms such as dizziness, hot flashes, and nausea
    Postpartum anxiety is treatable and often will go away once the right treatment is found.
    What is Postpartum Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (PPOCD)?
    What is Postpartum Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (PPOCD)?
    Postpartum obsessive-compulsive disorder is one of the newer disorders that is part of the postpartum mood disorders group. It is estimated that about 3-5% of postpartum women will experience some of the symptoms of PPOCD. Symptoms may include:

    Overly occupied with keeping the baby safe
    Compelled to do certain things over and over again to help relieve her anxiety and fears. This can include counting things, ordering things, listing things, checking and rechecking actions already performed, and cleaning repeatedly. May manifest itself in cleaning, feeding or taking care of the baby.
    May recognize these obsessions but feels horror and shame associated with them
    Obsessions or thoughts that are persistent, are repetitive and can include mental images of the baby that are disturbing
    Fear of being alone with the baby
    Women who suffer from PPOCD often know that these thoughts, actions and feelings are not normal and do not act on them. But the obsession can get in the way of a mom taking care of her baby properly or being able to enjoy her baby. With the right treatment, women with PPOCD can can experience freedom from being controlled by these obsessions and compulsions.
    What is Postpartum Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PPTSD)?
    What is Postpartum Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PPTSD)?
    Postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder often affects women who experienced a real or perceived trauma during childbirth or immediately after the baby was born. It is believed that approximately 1-6% of women experience postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder after giving birth.

    Traumas that might cause postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder include:

    Unplanned Cesarean
    Emergency complication such as prolapsed cord
    Birth that includes invasive interventions such use of vacuum extractor or forceps
    Baby having to stay in NICU
    Lack of support and assurance during the delivery; lack of communication from the birth and support team; feelings of powerlessness
    Symptoms of PPTSD may include:

    Nightmares and flashbacks to the birth or trauma
    Anxiety and panic attacks
    Feeling a detachment from reality and life
    Irritability, sleeplessness, hyper vigilance, startles more easily
    Avoid anything that brings reminders of the event such as thoughts, people, places, smells, noises, feelings
    May begin re-experiencing past traumatic events, including the event that triggered the disorder
    Women who are experiencing PPTSD need to talk with a health care provider about what they are feeling. With the correct treatment, these symptoms will lessen and eventually go away.
    What is Postpartum Psychosis (PPP)?
    What is Postpartum Psychosis (PPP)?
    Postpartum psychosis (PPP) is the most severe form of postpartum depression, but fortunately it is the rarest form. It occurs in 1 to 2 out of every 1,000 pregnancies. The onset is very sudden and severe, normally within 2 to 3 weeks after giving birth. Symptoms are characterized by a loss of touch with reality and can include:

    Bizarre behavior
    Suicidal thoughts
    Hallucinations and/or delusions
    Thoughts of hurting the baby
    Rapid mood swings
    Hyperactivity
    Postpartum psychosis is considered a medical emergency and should be treated immediately.



    If you or someone you know is struggling with any form of postpartum depression, please contact a physician, a friend, or the American Pregnancy Association so that the appropriate help can be located.


    Do I have a form of Postpartum Depression? : American Pregnancy Association


    There are many types so if you are having any feelings like this at all talk to your Dr ASAP!

    Rissa*Rawr is my Wifey as of 1/24/2012
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    #10
    I had borderline baby blues/PPD I was put on meds only for a month.
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