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Thread: E to O

  1. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    #1

    E to O

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    Anyone have any experience with a spouse going from enlisted to officer? More specifically in the Navy?

    DH has expressed interested in the Seaman to Admiral program the last couple months and he just informed me that his command will recommend him and believes he has a good chance of being chosen. I've read a little bit about the program and some of the requirements, but I'm looking for more. DHs first choice would be pilot, but I know as long as he gets off of subs he would be okay with anything. Hes interested in engineering, and I read that SWO, SPECWAR, and CEO look for an engineering degree. So if anyone has experience with these jobs I'll take that as well! DH would most likely be applying for the FY19 program and would be 27-29 upon commission, depending on when he started the program.
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    For pilot, the most important thing is his scores on the aptitude test. Technically, they are tests of aptitude, but one can study for them none the less and he should absolutley do that.

    How old is he, how old would be be at commissioning, and how long has be been enlisted. The age limit for pilot catches a lot of people for the Navy, but it's certainly not impossible. DH's current command has several mustang pilots.

    I'm happy to answer any aviation community questions you may have.
    Science always wins over bullshit. ~Dick Rutkowski
  3. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    Quote Originally Posted by villanelle View Post
    For pilot, the most important thing is his scores on the aptitude test. Technically, they are tests of aptitude, but one can study for them none the less and he should absolutley do that.

    How old is he, how old would be be at commissioning, and how long has be been enlisted. The age limit for pilot catches a lot of people for the Navy, but it's certainly not impossible. DH's current command has several mustang pilots.

    I'm happy to answer any aviation community questions you may have.
    He's currently 22 and has been in for four years. Depending on when he started the program, he would be anywhere between 27-29. The STA website said pilots have a max age of 29, but as long as he gets into the FY19 - FY21 program it shouldn't be an issue. I can't find a height requirement, but DH is 6'5" which I thought might be an issue.

    Overall, what's it like? Schedules, hours, deployments, quality of life, etc? I fully support his decision, but I also know he isn't guaranteed to get the job he wants, so I'm trying to get my bearing from all angles. I know nothing about any of the potential jobs so anything helps.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carolina View Post
    He's currently 22 and has been in for four years. Depending on when he started the program, he would be anywhere between 27-29. The STA website said pilots have a max age of 29, but as long as he gets into the FY19 - FY21 program it shouldn't be an issue. I can't find a height requirement, but DH is 6'5" which I thought might be an issue.

    Overall, what's it like? Schedules, hours, deployments, quality of life, etc? I fully support his decision, but I also know he isn't guaranteed to get the job he wants, so I'm trying to get my bearing from all angles. I know nothing about any of the potential jobs so anything helps.
    So I can say this is that all positions both enlisted and officer are going to have all different types of experience. The community, particular job......Let me put it in more perspective. I recently learned that Villanelle and I are married to people in the same community. But that being said the paths of our spouses have led very different types of work schedules to deployments. I hate to admit this but I am only on my second deployment and my spouse has been in for 11 years now. He had one on a carrier than went into the acquisitions community for almost 5 years and we are back in the fleet in what they call a expeditionary command for aviation (helo to be exact). The community is one thing. Now lets add on what happens in the world to how things go. My husband wasn't supposed to deploy till this spring but because of the two ships in the pacific things changed and he left much sooner. So there is no easy way to answer that question. When my spouse was a younger guy the schedule he had was very light. Go to work do his thing and be home generally with time to spare before dinner unless he was doing night events. Now.....because he has gone further in his rank I am lucky if he walks in the door 30 min before dinner. He is a busy man.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carolina View Post
    He's currently 22 and has been in for four years. Depending on when he started the program, he would be anywhere between 27-29. The STA website said pilots have a max age of 29, but as long as he gets into the FY19 - FY21 program it shouldn't be an issue. I can't find a height requirement, but DH is 6'5" which I thought might be an issue.

    Overall, what's it like? Schedules, hours, deployments, quality of life, etc? I fully support his decision, but I also know he isn't guaranteed to get the job he wants, so I'm trying to get my bearing from all angles. I know nothing about any of the potential jobs so anything helps.
    IIRC, 29 is the max age for no prior service, and that is the age at which they must be commissioned (so they have to finish OCS by then). But your DH would get a waiver for some prior service time, so I think he wouldn't be locked in to 29. Google for info on prior service waivers for the age limit and you should be able to find specifics.

    For the schedule, it is so, so hard to say. First there is flight school (which has a bunch of different phases and will require anywhere from 2-4 moves in most cases). Length depends on what community he ends up in. Basically, they do some pre-flight school stuff, then primary. After primary flight training, they select a community (helos, props, jets, although there may be more choices now). Then they go to intermediate and advanced, after which they select their actual aircraft. At that point, they get their wings and are officially pilots, but then they go to a training squadron where they learn to fly their actual airframe. Flight school is a bit weird because they hours they are required to actually be at "the office" are actually pretty limited, but there is a ton of studying, so it's kind of a crazy and intense time, and a lot of SOs struggle because they think their person is only working 4 hours and so should have a lot of time, but really, their job is styudying, and that will be at work, at home, and at study groups. After they wing and then qualify in their aircraft, they do their JO (junior officer) training. This is a sea duty billet, meaning they will deploy. It varies so much by community, but in general it seems as a very, very rough estimate, they are gone 6-8 months of a year. They are also studying to get various quals, so even when home, it is intense at times.

    After their JO tour, they go to shore duty. In most but not anywhere near all cases, they will go back to be an isntructor in one of the phases of flight training. This is generally a fairly chill job. They may be instructing night flights sometimes so it isn't a 100% predictable schedule, but the hours usually aren't long or crazy. After that, usually (but agian, not always) there is a disassociated sea tour. Usually that means being assigned to a boat (and thus going to sea), but not in a flying billet. Then if selected, they do a Department Head tour. (At this point, they are O-4s.) This means going back to a sea duty squadron. Hours here can be extremely brutal. At that point, they finish the DH job at very roughly 12 years after commissioning. After that things get more diverse, but that is a long, long way away for you guys.

    And again, I want to stress that this is just the basic structure and there are so many exceptions after that first JO sea tour.

    I believe that path is more or less the same for all communities (helo, props, jets, etc.). Jets take a bit longer before winging and before getting assigned to the first fleet squadron, but the info is more or less the same. What community he ends up in, and then what aircraft in that community is based partly on grades in flight school, and also needs of the Navy. Some weeks, the Navy may decide everyone is going to X community or X aircraft because the need abunch of people. Other times, the people with the best grades will get their choice on a dream sheet even everyone else getss what is left. But if your DH gets accepted into aviation, he will cross paths with isntrcutors from a lot of communities and aircraft and he can hear from each of them about their community and decide which community is a best fit for him (and of course he still needs to be prepared to get something else).

    At nearly all of these jobs, the hours are unpredictable. They are required to do night flights and the schedule is different every week. And most aviation sea duty jobs delploy about as much as most ship jobs, since squadrons are usually assigned to a specific boat. (There are exceptions, but even in those, the amount of time at sea is about the same as any surface boat.)
    Science always wins over bullshit. ~Dick Rutkowski
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    #6
    Oh, and I am pretty sure 6'5" doesn't disqualify him, but it might disqualify him from certain aircraft or communities. Also, it's not just height that matters. They measure sitting height and butt to knee and a million other obscure things. I think a lot of people who are too big for ejection seat aircraft end up in helos (or maybe also E2/C2 and P8s).
    Science always wins over bullshit. ~Dick Rutkowski
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    #7
    DH just did it, but he did through the army, so I'm not sure how similar it is.


  8. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    Thanks for the info! I seriously appreciate it. DH and I have only enlisted experience, and none in the fields he is interested in as an officer, so any information helps.

    Quote Originally Posted by bdizzle View Post
    DH just did it, but he did through the army, so I'm not sure how similar it is.
    He got out and went to school, didn't he? Deets please!
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    #9
    DB is E to O, but a Marine and not flight. I think the height cutoff for the Marines is around 6'6", DB had a friend with a flight contract make it all the way through the Marine part (OCS, TBS, and API) to arrive in Pensacola (Marines go through Navy flight school) and be told that he was too tall. I think he was actually re-designated to a ground contract, as he wouldn't qualify to fly certain air frames. Obviously the Navy is different and has many more aviators, and it would make sense if they are able to take people's height into consideration during aircraft selection.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carolina View Post
    Thanks for the info! I seriously appreciate it. DH and I have only enlisted experience, and none in the fields he is interested in as an officer, so any information helps.



    He got out and went to school, didn't he? Deets please!
    technically no. He did Green to Gold, where he stays active duty and they give him his pay and basically station him at his school. He had to work for ROTC, but he was still considered a cadet (he hated his life lol) but that just meant PT 3 times a week and ROTC classes. When he graduated, he went to BOLC. Technically they separated him after graduation, he got a DD214, but it was just for paperwork purposes so they could commission him.


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