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Thread: Pros and Cons of getting out?

  1. Kiss Me Through The Phone!
    Shanoony's Avatar
    Shanoony is offline
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    #1

    Help Pros and Cons of getting out?

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    DB is back to not knowing what he's gonna do and he's supposed to get out in January...I was wondering if anyone could give me the pros and cons of getting out if you don't really know what you want to do. One minute it's go to school, then it's become a merchant mariner, then it's stay in...I was hoping someone could help me help him make a decision even though in the end i know it's all up to him...

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    miss rachel's Avatar
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    #2
    My sister (a first LT in the AF) gave me some really good advice when I told her I wanted to commission as an AF officer upon graduation from college. She told me to never use the military when you are trying to figure out a path in life, because that is when it takes people over and they don't end up doing anything. Can he talk to a career person and weigh his options?
  3. Kiss Me Through The Phone!
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    #3
    he's gone once, but i don't think it helped him decide any and i guess (the only way i'd really know how the conversation went is if i was there) DB either didn't really ask the right questions or the person he talked to was trying to get him to stay in. But he's probably and most likely not giving me the full story. I'm just a worry wort and need help weighing options...lol I guess in the end this thread is more for me than him!

  4. He's the only other half that makes me whole ♥
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    #4
    my db was going thru the same thing...Now hes gonna get out. There are career counselors they can talk to and I know the usmc go thru classes when they around about to get out
    You can't just say I love you. You have to live I love you.
  5. Wife of a weather guy, mom to a toddler tornado!
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    #5
    DH got out in October, we're both much happier now.. I can go into detail if you'd like. Anyway, this is something I received from a friend when DH was talking about getting out... it has some great points!


    Job Seeker's Guide for those planning to separate.

    "Are you considering getting out of the military? If so, you'll have
    to be
    sure that the grass will really be greener on the other side. Here
    are a
    few things you should insist on when applying for a civilian job.

    1. If you have at least four years of service ask for a basic salary
    of
    $1235 to start and a guarantee of at least one annual pay raise. If
    you are
    an E-5 with six years of service you may want to ask for a starting
    salary
    of $2205. Be sure to mention that you will be expecting a promotion
    approximately every 2 years which will raise the salary around $200
    more.

    2. Let your potential employer know that you will be expecting them
    to
    provide your meals at no cost to you. If not, you'll be expecting
    over $200
    (tax free) to assist you with your grocery bill.

    3. Be sure to let them know that they must provide a place for you
    and your
    family to live that they will cover the cost for. Don't forget to
    mention
    that they will also pick up 100% of all utilities (water, gas,
    electricity).
    If they cannot provide that for you, be sure they will pay you a
    housing
    allowance of approximately $900. This must also be tax-free. If you
    have family members, they will have to pay more.

    4. While you're at it, demand that your employer provide a fully
    stacked
    grocery store, a department store, a furniture store, convenience
    stores,
    and an auto parts store with reduced prices so you can make your
    paycheck go
    as far as possible. If you drink alcohol, you'll probably want to
    ask for a
    liquor store with reduced prices, too. You'll probably want to
    insist on
    having a bank or credit union and a post office near your workplace
    for your
    convenience.

    5. Insist on 30 days vacation with pay per year (to include housing
    and
    grocery money during that month) that you begin as soon as you start
    at your
    new job. In addition, you want 10 federal holidays off with pay. You
    also
    want 10 additional days to make those holiday weekends a bit longer.

    6. Demand new clothes (provided by the employer) as soon as you
    start the
    new job and approximately $430 per year to defray the cost of
    laundry and
    replacing worn clothes.

    7. Be sure the employer plans to provide a retirement plan that will
    be at
    no cost to you. You will also want a retirement plan that you will be
    eligible for after only 20 years with the company (regardless of
    your age).
    Should you decide to stay longer, the retirement compensation should
    be
    increased for every year you stay with the company.

    8. Ask about the company's free medical and dental plans for you
    (100%
    coverage) and the plans covering your family at a minimal cost to
    you. The
    company should be willing to send you to see a specialist (at company
    expense) if they don't have a doctor on staff who can handle your
    particular
    medical situation. The company should also be willing to provide, at
    no
    cost to you, all the prescription or over-the-counter medications
    you might
    need.

    9. Be sure to inform your employer you don't expect to use leave
    hours if
    you're sick or injured and that you must be allowed time you need to
    take
    care of any personal matters (to take family members to the doctor,
    to pick
    up your sick child from school or daycare, take your car to the
    repair shop,
    etc) without using leave or having your pay reduced for the time
    you're off
    the job.

    10. Your new employer should also provide for you and your family a
    full
    line of fitness and recreation facilities (fully equipped gyms,
    swimming
    pool, tennis courts, golf course, riding stables, bowling, travel
    agency,
    craft shops, movie theaters, etc). Mention to them that these
    benefits will
    either be free or at a discounted price.

    11. Let your future boss know that you may decide to go to college
    during
    your free time and you expect the company to pay most of your tuition
    expenses. Don't worry about guaranteeing the boss you'll stay with
    the
    company long enough for the company to realize any of the benefits
    of your
    continued education. You'll also want free credits gained from your
    work
    experience with the company.

    12. Inform the boss you'll also need to use the company plane on
    occasion
    when you want to hop over to Hawaii or Europe during part of your 30-
    day
    vacation. Tell them you don't expect them to do it for free ...
    you'll be
    willing to pay $12 or so toward the expense of the trip as long as
    they
    provide a box lunch along the way.

    13. You'll have to tell them that you want either a guaranteed
    interest
    free loan or up to 2 months advanced pay in case of a family
    emergency. If
    a family member passes away the company will pick up the
    transportation
    costs no matter how much they add up to.

    14. Make sure the company has a legal team that is always available
    to you
    for every type of legal advice (divorce, powers of attorney, wills,
    custody
    issues, financial battles, etc). The legal team will also be
    available to
    you, at your convenience during the yearly tax season. Their
    services will
    also be of no cost to you.

    Once you've gotten all of these (or better) benefits, then you should
    consider moving on to a new job with that employer."

    Author unknown





  6. Account Closed
    Gillian_Angela's Avatar
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    #6
    Chad wasn't sure what he was going to do after he graduated H/S. And he figured out that he wanted to go to school, but he and his parents couldn't afford it.

    He didn't even know about FAFSA.

    Regardless to say, he's ready to get out and get on with his life and his career outside of the military. I'm ready for him to get out too, then we can finally settle down together in one place and start our family
  7. Kiss Me Through The Phone!
    Shanoony's Avatar
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    #7
    Thanks ladies! Appreciate the input. I wish I didn't worry so much!

  8. Darushka
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    Darushka's Avatar
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    #8
    In this economy, I'd be more worried about job security, which is something the military provides. That's a big pro that outweighs most cons for me.

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