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Thread: EFMP- qualifying conditions and career influences

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    #1

    Question EFMP- qualifying conditions and career influences

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    Hi, I have a few questions about EFMP, specifically the physical/chronic illness side as well as how it influences the soldier. I've looked through the official website and it's documents, but still have the following questions:

    1) is there specific physical conditions that qualify or don't qualify? It seemed fairly vague and general, saying chronic conditions which require care more than once a year. I have a list of conditions that I see doctors quite frequently for, and I am no stranger to ER/hospital trips, so I'm pretty certain I qualify but I'm not sure how many things to list out. I have more disruptive conditions such as Gastroparesis and Fibromyalgia and Dysautonomia, and then I have more "everyday" conditions such as gastritis/esophagitis and gastroesophogeal reflux disease. Basically, is there a line of what I should bother writing down?

    2) how dramatically will me being enrolled in EFMP affect my future spouse? I know it will limit where he can get sent, so obviously it will influence his career to at least a small extent. But is there still a decent number of bases around the country that have pretty thorough medical care available?

    3) this might be more Tricare related than EFMP related, but I'll ask anyway. Is there a difference (to the Army) if I get a diagnosis before enrolling or after enrolling? I'm in the lengthy process of getting diagnosed with a rare and serious condition and to be perfectly honest I don't know if I'll have a firm diagnosis within the next year or so (when we plan on getting at least legally married, ceremony will come after, whenever we can ). If they prefer to have everything up front, I will make further attempts to push along doctor appointments and getting the proper testing done, but if they don't care then I won't stress about it. I know some civilian insurance plans get weird about preexisting conditions vs new conditions.

    Thank you!
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    #2
    I've been wondering the same thing, I have lupus and chrons disease and DF didn't even know what EFMP was when I asked him...
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    #3
    So I looked into it briefly before DH got out of the Navy (never enrolled since he was getting out but.....) basically, depending on how severe your conditions are (there's no specific list), your spouse can be homesteaded (most severe - never move to another base), US only Large bases (second most severe - in the Navy there were only 4 bases that qualified on this list), US only Small/medium bases (Middle range - places where there's a normal clinic nearby), US+overseas with some restrictions (basically stuff you'd need to be seen 1-2 times a year for) or Anywhere (no medical restrictions).

    I was talking to someone about it after DH got out and found out we probably would have been homesteaded. I need to see highly specialized physicians/surgeons, not the usual type. San Diego had 3-4 that were great which is why we probably would have been told to stay there. So I would consider how many "specialists" you see and figure it out from there. Is a general gastroenterologist okay or do you need something more specific?\

    Tricare doesn't care about preexisting stuff but if you don't have a firm diagnosis they may want to do the testing all over again. A few of my doctors were, well, interested in doing some unnecessary investigative procedures out of curiosity because very few people have the same medical issues I do I let them do a couple harmless ones but didn't go through with any invasive ones (like putting an ultrasound wand up my butt to look at my bladder from behind )
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    #4
    A lot depends on the branch (they all handle it differently) and their job. In jobs where maybe they can only get stationed at a couple bases it could be a bigger issue career wise (for my husband it's relatively important to move around and change jobs in order to make higher SNCO ranks). My husband is AF and it's less black and white. It's up to the gaining base to determine if they can accept someone. Whereas other branches like the Navy it's predetermined what bases can take different EFMP categories.
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by AmandaRae90 View Post
    Hi, I have a few questions about EFMP, specifically the physical/chronic illness side as well as how it influences the soldier. I've looked through the official website and it's documents, but still have the following questions:

    1) is there specific physical conditions that qualify or don't qualify? It seemed fairly vague and general, saying chronic conditions which require care more than once a year. I have a list of conditions that I see doctors quite frequently for, and I am no stranger to ER/hospital trips, so I'm pretty certain I qualify but I'm not sure how many things to list out. I have more disruptive conditions such as Gastroparesis and Fibromyalgia and Dysautonomia, and then I have more "everyday" conditions such as gastritis/esophagitis and gastroesophogeal reflux disease. Basically, is there a line of what I should bother writing down?

    2) how dramatically will me being enrolled in EFMP affect my future spouse? I know it will limit where he can get sent, so obviously it will influence his career to at least a small extent. But is there still a decent number of bases around the country that have pretty thorough medical care available?

    3) this might be more Tricare related than EFMP related, but I'll ask anyway. Is there a difference (to the Army) if I get a diagnosis before enrolling or after enrolling? I'm in the lengthy process of getting diagnosed with a rare and serious condition and to be perfectly honest I don't know if I'll have a firm diagnosis within the next year or so (when we plan on getting at least legally married, ceremony will come after, whenever we can ). If they prefer to have everything up front, I will make further attempts to push along doctor appointments and getting the proper testing done, but if they don't care then I won't stress about it. I know some civilian insurance plans get weird about preexisting conditions vs new conditions.

    Thank you!
    No matter what your conditions/diseases are, you need to list everything. With the condition you are still being diagnosed with, it doesn't matter if you have it before or after you marry, you will most likely be enrolled in efmp but that is just one more condition for any accepting base to use in consideration. And how all your diagnoses affect him is just they could limit his bases for PCS'ing to. Each base will need to know your conditions to know if they have the care you need. Not all bases do nor have the ability to get you to the care you need.
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    #6
    I am familiar with Navy EFMP, which I'm told is much different some other branches. In the Navy, there are Admirals with family members at high levels of EFMP, so it certainly hasn't killed their career. But I know that services vary with how the program is administered, so I'll refrain from too much comment. But in the end, it doesn't really matter (in that is isn't really actionable) because it is required, and because it's something you'd want to do anyway because it could cause issues for you and get him in trouble if you don't, and because making sure you have access to the care you need is clearly the most important thing. EFMP gets a bad rap, and certainly it isn't perfect, but it exists for a reason and really does a lot of good. All most people see is that they aren't allowed to go somewhere that sounds cool and where they guess--with no real knowledge of how medical works at that place and all the complex factors that go in to the program--that they'll be fine. They don't see the big, complex picture, of making sure that there isn't just room now to be see, but that the military can be generally assured there will always be access to that care, and there will be access to the care someone needs if their condition progresses.

    But I will say that there should be no difference in when you get the diagnosis, when you enroll, etc. If you enroll and then your diagnosis comes through or changes, you'd have to update your EFM status as necessary. If you want to be truly in compliance, you should probably enroll immediately if you have any sort of chronic conditions, and then update if and when you get a different diagnosis. In reality, something that is pretty common (like reflux) and doesn't really require any ongoing care is often unreported.

    Tricare can't exclude pre-existing conditions, so there's no worry there.
    Science always wins over bullshit. ~Dick Rutkowski
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    #7
    Thank you all for your replies! Yall answered my questions pretty thoroughly I appreciate it

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