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Thread: SpaceHedgehog (Or other people familiar with Germany)

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    SpaceHedgehog (Or other people familiar with Germany)

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    I'm going to Germany in a little more than a month, and I have a couple of questions, mainly about food, if you don't mind answering them!


    I know most German food is meat based, but is there much in terms of vegetarian, or even fish, food options?

    Also, are nuts something that is used in German food? I'm really allergic, and I want to know if that's something I'm going to have to worry about. How do you say "nuts", specifically tree nuts, in German?

    TIA!
    R.I.P. My Love, Everyone was supposed to come home together, I'm sorry you had to come home early
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    German traditional food is heavily meaty, that is true, but Germany isn't an island onto itself It has ALL kinds of food available, and if you will cook for yourself, the fresh produce sections in supermarkets are enormous and well stocked. From what I have heard from a friend who recently visited New York and Puerto Rico, it is much cheaper to eat healthy here, vegetables and fruits are cheaper.

    If you will mostly be eating out, again, no problem. Don't go to a Biergarten (literally, beer garden) or traditional place, and you will have vegetarian and fish options in the menu. Menus are usually divided by meat, meaning you will have meat, poultry, fish, vegetarian, etc. options. Hell, even most traditional places have at least a few salads and vegetarian options (although not necessarily very healthy ones, Käsespätzle, for example, is a traditional vegetarian meal, but what it is a pretty heavy cheese pasta that I can eat about three forkfuls of before I die of cholesterol ).

    Pine nuts are often used in salads. Nut in German is "Nuss", plural "Nüsse". You also should mind the word "Kern" or "Kerne", it is seed, but in the sense of pine seed - Pinienkerne. Walnuss (walnut), Erdnuss (peanut), Pinienkern (pine nut), Haselnuss (hazelnut), Mandel (Almond), Cashewnuss (or just Cashew, self explanatory), Macadamia (self-explanatory, never seen it in a meal really), etc. Mostly, you have to mind the salads for pine nuts, and the pastries/deserts for almonds or walnuts, from my experience. Many places will also have an English menu, or at least a waiter who speaks pretty decent English, so don't fear to ask.

    Where will you be going?
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    When I lived in Japan my friend was allergic to pork, she had someone right out on a card "I am allergic to pork" in Japanese. That might be a good idea for you so you know there is no miscommunications.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpaceHedgehog View Post
    German traditional food is heavily meaty, that is true, but Germany isn't an island onto itself It has ALL kinds of food available, and if you will cook for yourself, the fresh produce sections in supermarkets are enormous and well stocked. From what I have heard from a friend who recently visited New York and Puerto Rico, it is much cheaper to eat healthy here, vegetables and fruits are cheaper.

    If you will mostly be eating out, again, no problem. Don't go to a Biergarten (literally, beer garden) or traditional place, and you will have vegetarian and fish options in the menu. Menus are usually divided by meat, meaning you will have meat, poultry, fish, vegetarian, etc. options. Hell, even most traditional places have at least a few salads and vegetarian options (although not necessarily very healthy ones, Käsespätzle, for example, is a traditional vegetarian meal, but what it is a pretty heavy cheese pasta that I can eat about three forkfuls of before I die of cholesterol ).

    Pine nuts are often used in salads. Nut in German is "Nuss", plural "Nüsse". You also should mind the word "Kern" or "Kerne", it is seed, but in the sense of pine seed - Pinienkerne. Walnuss (walnut), Erdnuss (peanut), Pinienkern (pine nut), Haselnuss (hazelnut), Mandel (Almond), Cashewnuss (or just Cashew, self explanatory), Macadamia (self-explanatory, never seen it in a meal really), etc. Mostly, you have to mind the salads for pine nuts, and the pastries/deserts for almonds or walnuts, from my experience. Many places will also have an English menu, or at least a waiter who speaks pretty decent English, so don't fear to ask.

    Where will you be going?
    I'm going to Dusseldorf/Cologne. Its only for 10 days, so only eating out. The hotel serves breakfast, which I know is just bread, cheese, meats, etc., which I'm fine with. Thanks for the info. I'm glad they kind of have separated menus at most places. My brother is going to be with me too, and he has spent a bit of time in Germany, so I'm sure he'll be helpful. I'm just afraid I'm going to starve because I don't eat meat all that much. Last summer we went on a cruise around the Mediterranean, and I managed to survive, but it was mostly Italy, where there is always pasta if all else fails. When it comes to doubt about there being nuts in something, I just don't eat. So I will definitely be watchful of desert and salads, which I usually am.

    What's the weather been like this year? I looked up the weather in Dusseldorf, and it said highs around 60 and lows in the 40s, but my brother says anything goes there. I don't trust Google to tell me the weather. I have to pack light because of all of the planes I have to take, and I don't want to be bringing a bunch of unnecessary stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by *Emma* View Post
    When I lived in Japan my friend was allergic to pork, she had someone right out on a card "I am allergic to pork" in Japanese. That might be a good idea for you so you know there is no miscommunications.
    Good idea! Space, how do you say "I'm allergic to nuts?".
    R.I.P. My Love, Everyone was supposed to come home together, I'm sorry you had to come home early
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    "Ich habe eine starke Nussallergie, bitte meine Gerichte ohne Nüsse und Kerne vorbereiten. Danke." (I have a strong nut allergy, please prepare my dishes without nuts and seeds. Thank you.). You might also be able to go to a doctor here (if you have some form of health insurance), and get an allergy ID, I have one although I never use it. If you have specific nuts you are super sensitive to, it is easy to make it more specific. Are you sensitive to soy?

    But really, there is little issue with communicating in English around here. Especially in the bigger cities, if you approach a young person in English, chances are they'll just smile and respond like it's no big deal. Because it isn't

    Germany is one of the least scary countries to be an English speaker in. Almost too easy, sometimes, many English speakers have no motivation to learn the language because of it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpaceHedgehog View Post
    "Ich habe eine starke Nussallergie, bitte meine Gerichte ohne Nüsse und Kerne vorbereiten. Danke." (I have a strong nut allergy, please prepare my dishes without nuts and seeds. Thank you.). You might also be able to go to a doctor here (if you have some form of health insurance), and get an allergy ID, I have one although I never use it. If you have specific nuts you are super sensitive to, it is easy to make it more specific. Are you sensitive to soy?

    But really, there is little issue with communicating in English around here. Especially in the bigger cities, if you approach a young person in English, chances are they'll just smile and respond like it's no big deal. Because it isn't

    Germany is one of the least scary countries to be an English speaker in. Almost too easy, sometimes, many English speakers have no motivation to learn the language because of it.
    Thanks. Yeah, I'm not extremely worried about communication. Anyways, I'm going to a trade show with my grandparents, its a HUGE show, so tons of foreigners all over Dusseldorf, I'm sure there won't be many problems. I'm assuming its not going to be like parts of Italy, where people were just downright rude because we obviously couldn't speak Italian.

    ETA: I'm not allergic to soy, just all tree nuts. Walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, etc. I'll probably be totally fine, as long as I avoid dessert. I'll have tons of Benadryl just in case though.
    R.I.P. My Love, Everyone was supposed to come home together, I'm sorry you had to come home early

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