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Thread: Lets talk ants

  1. MilitarySOS Jewel
    tremblingturtle's Avatar
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    #1

    Lets talk ants

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    We STILL have ants. Keeping the house clean does not seem to make a lick of difference. We have even called the orkin man, but here the damn ants are, back again. We fear that they are carpenter ants (which is why the orkin man does no good against them, i guess they do not cover carpenter ants) and they are here with a vengeance. Today Anabelle went on an ant hunt, and found about a dozen ants in our house.... All in an hours time.

    How can I kill the ants, keep them from coming back, while still being child/pet safe? Sprinkling stuff on the floor will not work with the kids, they will mess with it/eat it. So baby powder/cornmeal is out.
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    #2
    Do you have pics of the ants? Can you capture one? If you can capture one you may be able to have it identified (either a pest company, local extension office, etc) - which will help immensely. Where are you finding them? A lot of times it isn't about food so much as it is water (why you find them in bathrooms, etc and often in the kitchen it is more about the sink than the food areas). Did the orkin man spray, leave baits, or?
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    #3
    I've come across a few different pins on Pinterest about ant killers, maybe something there will be helpful?

    This one is citrus: Homemade Citrus Ant Killer | eHow
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    #4
    We don't find them any one place.
    Yesterday one attacked me on the couch, today anabelle found hers all over the house in the carpets. We sometimes find them in the kitchen, sometimes they are on the counter, sometimes on the floor. THey are just everywhere.

    The good thing about Anabelle hunting ants, is she wants to catch them and keep them in a water bottle. We are going to call the orkin guy back out, and show him the ants we have been catching.

    Last time he was here, the orkin guy sprayed the out side of our house, and put bait in all of the windows and electrical outlets and around the base boards.
  5. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    #5
    Do they have wings?
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    #6
    Nope, no wings.

    they are fairly large though, they are for sure not the common house/sugar ant. And they bite
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    #7
    We get huge ones at work with wings... They come out of no where and they are very annoying.. I hope you can get a resolution quickly.

    Control measures [edit]

    In their natural environment, carpenter ants nest in dead trees and other dead wood. This enhances decay, which has ecological benefits. However, the ant achieves pest status when a colony invades the wood of a house or other structure, damaging its structural integrity.[1]
    Since they favor moist wood as a habitat, any condition that promotes moisture should be eliminated to prevent infestation. The easiest of these is keeping gutters clear so that water does not run down the side of the structure or gain entry. Moist wood is much easier to chew. The ants do not eat the wood, but remove it to create galleries for their activities. The galleries run parallel to the grain, as they are created in the softer, non-lignin portions of the timber. The galleries have a sandpaper-like feel, due to fecal remnants, but the mud-tubes produced by termites will not be present. Sawdust-like piles of frass sometimes accumulate below sites of activity.
    Any wood in contact with the ground can be a source of entry, and water draining toward the structure will also encourage these ants. Sloping the surrounding ground away from the structure will remedy this method of entry. Leaks inside the house from plumbing or appliances can also create the moist conditions that encourage these species.
    Reducing moisture will not eliminate an established colony. One can spray the insects with common household insecticides to kill them, but this is unlikely to penetrate enough to reliably kill the colonies deep in the wood. Since it is likely that the wood housing the main nest is no longer structurally sound, the complete removal of the nest and structural repair are required.
    The main nest must be located, by tracing the foraging workers as they return home. Winged males leave the nest to reproduce, so there is little point in following them. The males leave in search of sunlight, so they are often seen near doors and windows (as exit points). If winged ants are seen, there is a colony nearby, so this is an important warning sign. Structural damage can be extensive by the time external damage is visible, such as sawdust or bubbling paint.
    Various kinds of pesticide measures are now used, including diatomaceous earth, granular chemicals, biologicals, and soil poisoning. The last alternative is the least environmentally-sound, since it requires widespread distribution of large amounts of poison. The granular chemicals exploit the insects' fondness for sweets, by offering slow-acting insecticides in food substances. The granules are carried back to the nest, where the weak poisons will be slowly fed to the queen until she expires.[citation needed]
    I found this on Wiki not sure how reliable it is..
    Black carpenter ant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    #8
    I've never used this, but a friend gave me this recipe just a couple days ago: 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 tablespoon Borax, 1 1/2 cup warm water. take old jar lids and wad up some paper towels or TP, soak w/ Borax solution, sit ant cups out. they will take back to next and will kill neck. check and refil till ants are gone for one week.
  9. Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
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    #9
    I don't know if you have done this or not, but the exterminator told me it's real important to keep any bushes/trees/shrubs/etc. trimmed back as far from the windows and walls of the house as possible. I guess it makes it more tempting and easier for bugs to make their way inside if the plants are right up on the house. Ants and spiders in particular, he said.
  10. I Will Rise Above
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    #10
    I use peppermint oil in water and spray it around they hate it.
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