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Thread: Carpet removal?

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    NocturneSiren's Avatar
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    #1

    Shock Carpet removal?

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    Anyone ever ripped up carpeting? My mom and I are getting ready to go for it, elbows up! Hiring a professional is not an option... Any advice?
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    #2
    wear gloves ! those stupid tact boards smart sometimes. we had to use a crow bar and a hammer to get them off the floor . you are gonna need a broom and dustpan for all the crud that comes off the carpet lol . oh and if anything had spilled on that carpet be prepared for the pad to be stuck to the floor oh and mildew.


    not sure if i was much help but we ripped ours out after the house flooded it was really gross too.
    I feel the need to be petted too!
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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by leanne View Post
    wear gloves ! those stupid tact boards smart sometimes. we had to use a crow bar and a hammer to get them off the floor . you are gonna need a broom and dustpan for all the crud that comes off the carpet lol . oh and if anything had spilled on that carpet be prepared for the pad to be stuck to the floor oh and mildew.
    I agree with all this.
    Make sure you got somewhere to dispose of the carpet.
    We ripped up all carpets in our house when we bought it. It only took a few hours ( thats a 4 bedroom house) . Make sure to clean the floor with desinfectant after everything has been removed.
    I also wore kneepads as I once got a nail in my knee It all depend how its been attached. You must remove anything that protrudes to prepare for a new carpet.
    Good luck
  4. Darkly Dreaming Dexter
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    #4
    to all the above - safety is key!!

    We removed carpet from out entire livingroom, hallway and part of the kid's bedroom...
    To actually remove it: get a heavy duty knife (they make special blades to cut carpet, actually, this makes it easier but it's not necessary.)
    We used a double-claw crowbar (with a flat, low swoop on one side and a 90-deg hook on the other) and this worked out great.
    And a regular hammer.

    Use your crowbar or something (not your fingers!) To life up the edge of the carpet - stand up and pull a bit. If the piece you're lifting is wide (I'd say more than 4') then get your knife and cut one end to the other. It's hard to cut through carpet - it might take a few passes...mainly worry about the mesh on top - the underlay often rips or can be cut with scissors as you go.
    Then get behind the lifted carpet and begin to roll it up.
    Now - carpet (either the top part or the underlay) is sometimes stapled down all over the place so you have to consider that when you roll it up.
    If it's stapled it'll just pull and pop the staples but sometimes they're stubborn - use a flat-head screwdriver to help pop them up.

    Staple removal: You can remove the staples by taking your crowbar - putting the low-swoop side on the floor next to it and whacking the 90-deg end with a hammer...it takes some practice but after a while you'll get real good at it.

    For the tack strip: Use the low-swoop side, again, find the nail that tacks the strip to the floor - wedge your crowbar next to it as flush to the floor as possible and with a few sharp whacks you should have your bar under it and a pry can pop it up - go down the line and do this at ever securing nail.
    It's best to try to keep your tack in big pieces but it often tends to break apart.
    If your carpet has been relaid and you have two tack strips it's easier to try to remove them at the same time.

    What kind of floor are you laying down instead: hardwood, tile or more carpet?
    If you're laying down hardwood or tile and you have big swollen areas that have been water damaged and they puff up - you can use an electric sander to smooth it down (we had to do this everwhere and it sucked but now our hardwood floor lays down nice and flat)

    There you go - all my tips and hints from our experience...we took it up, threw it out and LOVE it!

    *edit* Oh - if some areas are seriously rotted or water-damaged you can take that flooring up (with a crowbar and a lot of umph) and replace it. But that's only necessary if there's serious damage and your new floor won't be able to secure to it.

    Heh: poor-man's solutions.
    Just occured to me that throughout all of our remodeling endeavors we haven't always had certain things on hand...or they broke or something.
    For knee pads: take tube socks, etc, and cut the feet off - layer them up.
    For a hammer: a block of wood or even a rock just be careful of your fingers and sometimes things like this break during use.
    For a heavy-duty knife: any good, sharp kitchen knife will work ok - just be careful
  5. Can anyone fast forward time?
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    #5
    Watch out for nails!!! It seems like no matter how many times you sweep there are some that magically appear!
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    #6
    Aunt Sponge pretty much covered it all! The only thing I would add is if you've got pet stains or something like that, you might want to seal the floors. I used Kilz low odor in my house (our renters had unauthorized cats who used the entire house as a litter tray). It works like a charm. You can either paint it just on the stains, or cover the whole floor if it's pretty bad (that's what I did).

    Make sure you sweep really well before you Kilz or lay your new flooring. A shop-vac is probably your best option because it will get ALL of the dust up.

    I think the hardest part for me when I ripped out all the carpet from our house was the tack strip in our lower-living room. The sub-floor is concrete, so that made it a bit more challenging. But the crow-bar worked.

    I actually used a chisle (?sp) for pulling up the staples from the pad. The corner worked great. Pulling up the staples is the most time consuming part, but it's not that bad.
  7. Darkly Dreaming Dexter
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    #7
    Yeah - you'll be happy when you're done with it Time well spent.

    good idea about the Kilz - never thought of that! I'll definately do that in our kid's room when we put down new carpet. Ooooh yeah.

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