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Thread: The Importance of College

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    #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdizzle View Post
    and with the loan thing, they pay 33% of your loans down each year of service during your first three years instead of giving you a GI bill. That part anyone can do actually, when you enlist. If you don't want a GI bill (because you already have a degree) you can have your loans paid instead. The army does it up to 40k, the Air Force up to 65k.
    Re the bolded, they will pay for three years, but it doesn't start until you have served one year as a JAG officer, meaning your first year you will have to be making the monthly payments on your own unless you can make some type of arrangement with the lender. Still, it is a good deal.
    https://www.airforce.com/version/149...chure_TJAG.pdf
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    #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Guynavywife View Post
    It depends. But are we including trade schools?
    That depends as well. Personally I draw the line based on how much hands-on work the trainee does, and if they're being paid. If they're not being paid, or spend more time in the classroom than the workshop, to me that's closer to a traditional college than to a traditional apprenticeship. Apprenticeships DO have some class time, but the bulk of it is in the working world. In my field...I'd consider something like the Culinary Institute of America to be college.

    Does your answer change depending on how trade schools are categorised?
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    #53
    I've heard of situations where someone didn't have a degree, just years of experience and they were fine. But I've personally seen my uncle go through the difficulties of not being promoted because he didn't have a degree. He's been with the same company for almost 20 years, but they kept passing him over because other people had a degree and he didn't. He had seniority over those people and more experience and was qualified enough to be promoted, but without a degree the company wouldn't. So he went back to school and got his master's in order to be promoted.
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    #54
    I think that people should follow what they are passionate about. If that is studying in college to become a chemist or training as a welder, that is what you should do because passionate people are the ones who ultimately become the most successful in their field of work. This really isn't always practical in the real world because being passionate doesn't mean that you will necessarily be skilled at it. Also, many students don't have a passion by the time they graduate high school, so the most realistic option is to get a degree that will look good on a resume.

    College degrees automatically open more doors for someone looking for high paying job, while technical jobs can be more risky. There is still a demand for technical jobs and if you are really good, you can go really far.

    I would love for everyone to be able to follow their passion and dreams, but that's not always what the world can allow.
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    #55
    Quote Originally Posted by caljmw649 View Post
    I've heard of situations where someone didn't have a degree, just years of experience and they were fine. But I've personally seen my uncle go through the difficulties of not being promoted because he didn't have a degree. He's been with the same company for almost 20 years, but they kept passing him over because other people had a degree and he didn't. He had seniority over those people and more experience and was qualified enough to be promoted, but without a degree the company wouldn't. So he went back to school and got his master's in order to be promoted.

    Yeah I think those days are pretty much over. My company used to pride itself on being one where you could work from the bottom to the top without college etc but they just got rid of the stepping stone position a few months ago so that's not happening anymore you're not gonna go from a normal customer service person to an assistant store manager with nothing in between without a degree.
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    #56
    [QUOTE=bdizzle;10059042]so they have two different programs, one where you're in af ROTC for two years and the other you're in ROTC for one year. Both end with a commission in to JAG at graduation, they just have different specifics during school years (like pay, certain classes, other random stuff).

    and with the loan thing, they pay 33% of your loans down each year of service during your first three years instead of giving you a GI bill. That part anyone can do actually, when you enlist. If you don't want a GI bill (because you already have a degree) you can have your loans paid instead. The army does it up to 40k, the Air Force up to 65k. my law school is paid for because I'm lucky enough to have my husband give me his GI bill because he didn't need it. He did green to gold, where was in Army ROTC during college and they paid for everything while he went from enlisted to officer.[/]

    Have you spoken with a recruiter intensively? Because for enlisted at least the AF CLRP, as far as I know, is no longer available. I have some friends who got lucky enough but others who did not. Plus the program comes with some downfalls. For enlisted (because I can't speak for an officer) it has to be written into your original contract or else you can't use it. Plus you lose your GI Bill, and I think it's only like $10000, plus that's taxable income just like an enlistment bonus and not all loans qualify. It's a very tricky program, if it's even still available.
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    #57
    I do not have a college degree and neither does my husband. We cleared $100k in 2015 and again in 2016. No, I don't think you have to have a college degree to get a good job. It's also important to consider the market you will be living in. Here in UT unemployment is low when you are just looking at the people who are capable of working and want work. A combination of work ethic, right climate, and industry can get you places.
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    #58
    I mean, I think going to college just to get a magic piece of paper is ridiculous or doing it cause it's just what you do after high school is dumb. College can be a great way to gain experience, knowledge, or do networking that will help in a future career/job. THAT's why you should do it. Many jobs and careers are gunna require it but it's going to take more than just showing your diploma to land you a job and I think that's where people's perception of what college is/should be is wrong. They think I got a degree so now I deserve a high paying job and that's not how it works unfortunately. It's all about who you know and college is a great place to do some networking. I went to college cause it was required for the career I wanted, but I got a job because I took advantage of the networking opportunities I had in college.

    And if you wanna work your way up, but experience isn't enough and they want a degree... that's a pretty compelling reason o go to college at an older age which honestly makes so much more sense to me rather than jumping straight into education debt and then having to start from the bottom anyways, yknow?
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