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Thread: Why/how do we pick and choose who to hate?

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    #1

    Why/how do we pick and choose who to hate?

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    So I read something said by someone in a discussion about the shootings in Paris yesterday about (and I'm paraphrasing here) how she can't help but notice that in most if not all terrorist attacks are men and how men are socialized to believe in and accept violence as a way of dealing with conflict if they believe strongly enough in what they are fighting over.

    Someone else said "people are all "the terrorists are almost always followers of Islam so that must mean Islam is fatally flawed" but we rarely hear "the terrorists were almost always men so men must be fatally flawed"."

    I have to agree with them. I've seen people over the past 24 hours attacking Islam and using the incident yesterday as further "proof" that it is an inherently violent religion. Yet we don't see people blaming men, or pointing out how men are inherently violent when almost all violent attacks, bombings, mass shootings are committed by males.

    I think that it boils down to Xenophobes raising their pitchforks. It's easy to hate someone from another country or religion because, well, I'd never do what they do. I look at Christians judging homosexuals the same way, the ones that want to call them names or impose rules/laws upon them - it's easy for a vast proportion of the population to not be gay. It is not easy to not eat shellfish, not shave, not wear mixed blend clothes, so those are the things the bible says that are overlooked.

    I'm curious about others opinions on it.
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    #2
    I can pretty much agree with you. I think that's an interesting way to look at it as well!

    I personally do not think all Muslims are inherently violent people. I'm 99% sure most Muslims do not condone the radical, violent "we're shooting you in the name of Islam" actions. This is also coming from me as a Christian believer. But I am surrounded by a family who is extremely conservative and thinks Muslim=Terrorist and "Islam Sympathizers" are just horrible traitors. However, what they fail to realize is that as a Christian, the bible is chock full of violence, death and persecution that can equate to what we think is so god awful in the Koran. There are many wars that were fought in the name of Christianity. Even Hitler himself was a Christian and he used that as a platform to condone murdering so many Jewish people. There are Christians who beat and kill LGBT individuals just because of their sexual orientation. Or radicals who bomb abortion clinics to "save" unborn fetuses.

    I am a Christian. I believe in God, I love Jesus and I go to church most Sunday's when I can. I absolutely hate what Christianity has become though in today's society. I guess I'm a lot more loving than some and I like to embrace people from all walks of life without judgement or questions. I genuinely wish I could say the same about the rest of my family but I can't and I think a lot of it is the product of how we/they were raised though. It's easy to hate someone because they're different and new and different things can be scary. But being a Christian, I want to be "Christ-like" and to do that I try and model myself based on how Jesus was as a man. He was loving, he did not judge or condemn anyone, regardless of if they were a whore or a thief or poor or believed a different religion. He loved. And at the end of the day, that is what really matters and how I am teaching my daughter to embrace and accept others. I'm not sure if that answers the question but I feel like I'm getting rambley now.
    Last edited by amandalouwho2; 01-08-2015 at 09:14 AM. Reason: Typo!


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    #3
    Maybe people judge the Islam as the terrorist because it is a more specific identifier to separate themselves from the terrorist.

    As a female, Asian Christian, I've heard of many, many things like...

    - "must be a girl thing" (if they're a guy)
    - "You Asians are so..." (if they're of different ethnicity)
    - "(I left the church because) all you Christians are hypocrites" (if they're Agnostic or just someone who left the church)

    If a person have only met bad women, crazy Asians, mean Christians, then I can see why they would hate such group. I mean, it's pretty small minded of them to categorize, but I can see why they would. They base their thoughts on their limited experience. I wouldn't be surprised if those people who just bashes the Islam are people who do not have a single Islam friend, nor have heard of a good deed done by this group. It's easier to judge a group when you have no association with them in any way. Also, maybe they categorize like that because it's the farthest from the truth, something they will/can never be so it's safer to say such things. For example, you HAVE to be born Asian, you can't just choose to be one lol.
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    #4
    These same people dismiss all the situations that don't fit in their confirmation bias. How many of the mass shooting in the US lately have been Muslims? Sandy Hook? The guy in the CO movie theater? Columbine?

    Almost none, as a percentage.
    Science always wins over bullshit. ~Dick Rutkowski
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by BraveLilToaster View Post
    if they believe strongly enough in what they are fighting over.
    Sorry to butcher your quote BLT, but I think, for me personally, that fragment right there sums up the answer to your topic question.

    As for men being the inherently violent, I can see that...to a point. Many of the mass terror attacks we have heard about recently stem from some extremist group of a religion. In the ones I have researched, the women are hidden away and sheltered, or used as pawns to be human bombs in malls. I believe that because they are kept so down trodden, we don't see the commando style violence from them.

    Now, I know that not all terror attacks are religious based (Oklahoma City, Sandy Hook), but some of the reason that we don't see women can be explained above.
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    #6
    For some its just easier to blame a religion than a whole body of persons. Because to say 'males are violent' (or whatever) its easier and maybe more PC in their minds to say 'Islamics are violent'...
    People want someone or something to blame. To blame a whole relgion give some meaning and purpose.

    Question is.. are these people saying properly informed of what's happening, or saying based on biased opinions?

    While I don't think ALL males are violent, I would likely say something along the lines of (in relation to terroism) 'Islamic males are violent'.. and even that is a generalization because I'm sure not all islamic males are violent. But in relation to attacks and things that have happened in the last however many years, its been more Islamic males than anyone..

    But.. that doesn't answer how or why we get to choose to hate..

    There are 10 types of people in the world, those that understand binary and those that don't
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    #7
    I do think it has to do with how different they are perceived to be. Like men make up roughly 50% of the population anywhere on earth so chances are we either are a man or we know enough men to be able to realize the people doing these things aren't doing it cause they are men, but because *they* are personally messed up in other ways. It's easy to empathize with people of other genders. We don't really see their worldview as being wholly different. But, like, 0.6% of the US is Islamic. So a lot of people don't interact with enough on a daily basis to be able to go "oh wait, these are mostly just normal people, the terrorists must be messed up for other reasons." AND the fact a lot of people's worldview/morals etc are shaped by their religion and Islam is a different religion it is extremely easy to other them. Same goes for most marginalized groups. They are perceived to be a minority and perceived to be other and some people don't interact with enough to get over their bias.
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    #8
    Here in Germany we have an increasing issue with extremists who accordingly "fight for their religion". An impression that I've received is that the majority of these folks have struggled to find orientation anywhere else in society. Here they are unfortunately often treated as second class citizens because of their origin as immigrants. They get a stamp put on them which makes it incredibly difficult to receive a good education and to find jobs. They struggle to find their position and to become accepted members of society. They desperately seek recognition and want to belong. Extremist organisations allow them to become part of a mighty group and to be heroes with their actions.
    Of course this does not apply to each individual, but there seems to be a pattern.
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    #9
    It's always easy to point fingers or blame other people, but those who fall into this "other" camp are almost always members of a minority demographic, whether they be a minority, a foreigner from the ME, a woman, a non-Christian, or below the privileged class.

    A lot of shit has been done in the name of various religious ideologies. Many seem to forget that no ideology, religious tradition, worldview, etc., has a clean record. Makes me wonder if the Spanish Inquisition, Crusades, war against "heretics," anyone who denounced the Church, war against Pagans, women, minorities, underprivileged, etc., is somehow conveniently ignored or forgotten. Selective memory and all that.

    As many say, this is predominantly a WASP culture. So white protestant men have the power, but you certainly won't see a good chunk of them recognizing they are the common denominator in a lot of the issues that has or still exists today.
    Pax, Aeon
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by villanelle View Post
    These same people dismiss all the situations that don't fit in their confirmation bias. How many of the mass shooting in the US lately have been Muslims? Sandy Hook? The guy in the CO movie theater? Columbine?

    Almost none, as a percentage.
    Yep. I understand why various cognitive biases exist, especially if such biases are prevalent or exist in a specific, sheltered, culture. The individual's lack of exposure to other influences, ideas, views, and concepts further shields them from other perspectives and experiences. So, basically, lack of exposure/experience and the unwillingness to objectively weigh their presuppositions and new information leads to this sort of thinking. Some people are perfectly content this way, unfortunately.
    Pax, Aeon
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