Military Significant Others and Spouse Support - MilitarySOS.com

View Poll Results: Should Congress repeal "dont ask dont tell" law/policy???

Voters
64. You may not vote on this poll
  • yes

    40 62.50%
  • no

    13 20.31%
  • not sure

    11 17.19%
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Military study: "dont ask dont tell" policy

  1. Account Closed
    I_love_my_Sailor's Avatar
    I_love_my_Sailor is offline
    Account Closed
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lemon Grove, Cali
    Posts
    1,099
    #1

    Military study: "dont ask dont tell" policy

    Advertisements
    read this on yahoo... got me thinking...

    Do you think Congress should repel the "don't ask don't tell" law/policy?

    Study: Military gays don't undermine unit cohesion

    By ANNE FLAHERTY, Associated Press Writer 1 hour, 28 minutes ago

    WASHINGTON - Congress should repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" law because the presence of gays in the military is unlikely to undermine the ability to fight and win, according to a new study released by a California-based research center.

    The study was conducted by four retired military officers, including the three-star Air Force lieutenant general who in early 1993 was tasked with implementing President Clinton's policy that the military stop questioning recruits on their sexual orientation.

    "Evidence shows that allowing gays and lesbians to serve openly is unlikely to pose any significant risk to morale, good order, discipline or cohesion," the officers states.

    To support its contention, the panel points to the British and Israeli militaries, where it says gay people serve openly without hurting the effectiveness of combat operations.

    Undermining unit cohesion was a determining factor when Congress passed the 1993 law, intended to keep the military from asking recruits their sexual orientation. In turn, service members can't say they are gay or bisexual, engage in homosexual activity or marry a member of the same sex.

    Supporters of the ban contend there is still no empirical evidence that allowing gays to serve openly won't hurt combat effectiveness.

    "The issue is trust and confidence" among members of a unit, said Lt. Col. Robert Maginnis, who retired in 1993 after working on the issue for the Army. When some people with a different sexual orientation are "in a close combat environment, it results in a lack of trust," he said.

    The study was sponsored by the Michael D. Palm Center at the University of California at Santa Barbara, which said it picked the panel members to portray a bipartisan representation of the different service branches. According to its Web site, the Palm Center "is committed to keeping researchers, journalists and the general public informed of the latest developments in the 'don't ask, don't tell' policy debate." Palm himself was "a staunch supporter of civil rights in the gay community," the site says.

    Two of the officers on the panel have endorsed Democratic candidates since leaving the military — Army Lt. Gen. Robert Gard, who supports Barack Obama, and Marine Corps Gen. Hugh Aitken, who backed Clinton in 1996.

    Air Force Lt. Gen. Robert Minter Alexander, a Republican, was assigned in 1993 to a high-level panel established by the Defense Department to examine the issue of gays in the military. At one point, he signed an order that prohibited the military from asking a recruit's sexual orientation.

    Alexander said at the time he was simply trying to carry out the president's orders and not take a position. But he now believes the law should be repealed because it assumes the existence of gays in the military is disruptive to units even though cultural attitudes are changing.

    Further, the Defense Department and not Congress should be in charge of regulating sexual misconduct within the military, he said.

    "Who else can better judge whether it's a threat to good order and discipline?" Alexander asked.

    Navy Vice Adm. Jack Shanahan said he had no opinion on the issue when he joined the panel, having never confronted it in his 35-year military career. A self-described Republican who opposes the Bush administration's handling of the Iraq war, Shanahan said he was struck by the loss of personal integrity required by individuals to carry out "don't ask, don't tell."

    "Everyone was living a big lie — the homosexuals were trying to hide their sexual orientation and the commanders were looking the other way because they didn't want to disrupt operations by trying to enforce the law," he said.

    On the Net:

    Palm Center: http://www.palmcenter.org
  2. OneSailorsGirl25
    Guest
    OneSailorsGirl25's Avatar
    Guest
    #2
    I really think they should. Just because someone has a difference sexual preference than others may share, it makes him or her no less of a man or woman who is capable of holding a position in the military. Maybe men feel differently about other men, but as a women, I am not threatened, or feel uncomfortable around another woman, who happens to be attracted to women. HOw many able bodied individuals have not joined the military even though they have a desire to, simply because you can't be homosexual and have a military career. Makes no sense to me, it is discriminatory of these people, and in my mind is unconstitutional. JMO
  3. My Life is My Own Again! YAY!!
    WGs_Grrl's Avatar
    WGs_Grrl is offline
    My Life is My Own Again! YAY!!
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    NoVA/He's on a boat right now, but stationed in Japan
    Posts
    2,642
    #3
    It kills me that they needed to do a STUDY on this. No duh, you morons! EFFING HOMOPHOBIA!!!
  4. Senior Member
    timsgurl1776's Avatar
    timsgurl1776 is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,522
    Blog Entries
    4
    #4
    I am going to go with I really don't know. I just wonder if they did how many hate crimes might occur. That is what personally scares me...is that there are always going to be closed minded people...
  5. Keep Calm and Ride Unicorns
    Twinderella's Avatar
    Twinderella is offline
    Keep Calm and Ride Unicorns
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    48,082


    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by timsgurl1776 View Post
    I am going to go with I really don't know. I just wonder if they did how many hate crimes might occur. That is what personally scares me...is that there are always going to be closed minded people...
    At least if they repeal it when hate crimes happen the victims can report it. As it stands now, if a gay person is harassed or assaulted they can't report the crime or they risk being investigated themselves and being discharged for being gay. Crimes go unreported and people get away with it because of the DADT policy. Repealing it would make that better, not worse. At least then the people who commit the crimes cn be held accountable and kicked out, not the victims.
  6. Banned
    Lizim1981's Avatar
    Lizim1981 is offline
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Everett, WA Like New Jersey, only no cool mobsters or sunshine!
    Posts
    5,466
    #6
    There is a guy on Patrick's ship eho is gay. Everybody knows it. It's kinda hard not to. Nobody harrasses him because he's good at his job and doesn't hit on the guys.

    I think honestly for the most part guys don't really care. Once they get used to it and realize that just because a guy is gay doesn't mean he wants to fuck you, they just forget about it.
  7. Senior Member
    Ghedi's Avatar
    Ghedi is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ (Veteran)
    Posts
    908

    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by timsgurl1776 View Post
    I am going to go with I really don't know. I just wonder if they did how many hate crimes might occur. That is what personally scares me...is that there are always going to be closed minded people...
    I'm going to pull a Reductum Ad Absurdum argument here... but...

    Along the lines of what you're saying... that we should limit people's abilities to express themselves because of potential of danger... If we follow your logic, then we should create a don't ask, don't tell policy with regards to religion. No matter what religion you are, you can't wear any object of your religion, can't pray (even in the privacy of your barracks), can't talk to anybody about religion... and, since homosexuals can't even attempt to get married without being kicked out, people can't even attempt to go to church.

    What about race? Should we have a don't ask, don't tell policy for the color of people's skin? How would we enforce that... put blindfolds on everybody?

    Yes, Reductum ad Absurdum is a logical fallacy, but so is the basis of the DADT policy... And, wasn't it our founding fathers who warned us against giving up essential liberties (be who we are) in exchange for temporary and illusory security?
    /* no comment */
  8. Keep Calm and Ride Unicorns
    Twinderella's Avatar
    Twinderella is offline
    Keep Calm and Ride Unicorns
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    48,082


    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Lizim1981 View Post
    There is a guy on Patrick's ship eho is gay. Everybody knows it. It's kinda hard not to. Nobody harrasses him because he's good at his job and doesn't hit on the guys.

    I think honestly for the most part guys don't really care. Once they get used to it and realize that just because a guy is gay doesn't mean he wants to fuck you, they just forget about it.
    I have heard the "but the military isn't READY for gays to openly serve" argument when this topic comes up countless times. Um, who says they aren't ready? Since when is the military this huge group of homophobic closed minded bigots who wouldn't be able to do their jobs if there was a gay person in the room? I know that I personally have a lot more respect for the military than that assumption gives them. I have faith that the military actually understands all of that stuff that they talk about all the time... Loyalty, duty, honor, sacrifice, selfless service... Serving your COUNTRY, not your own self interests.

    Maybe that's just me?
  9. Senior Member
    timsgurl1776's Avatar
    timsgurl1776 is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,522
    Blog Entries
    4
    #9
    I didn't want to enter into a big debate......I agree with Wicked in that it would be good for the fact that if hate crimes do happen they could report it....In the end, I would want to know the opinion of gay people in the military. That is why I said I don't know...
  10. Banned
    Miss B Hav'n's Avatar
    Miss B Hav'n is offline
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Inducky :-)
    Posts
    11,120
    #10
    Yes, I believe the DADT policy should be a thing of the past. Anyone willing to put on the uniform and serve our nation should be able to do so openly.
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •