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Thread: Incarceration/rehabilitation

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    #1

    Incarceration/rehabilitation

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    Do you believe that criminals can be successfully reintroduced into society at some point?

    Do you believe they should be held in prison until they die, or do you think the government should be investing in rehab programs? How would that affect the prison pupulation?

    When does the death penalty come into play for you, if at all?

    Does your opinion differ based on the crime? Why?

    This was inspired by another thread, hoping to make something productive of it because it got me thinking.

    Where do you stand?
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    #2
    Do you believe that criminals can be successfully reintroduced into society at some point? Depends on the crime, the severity, the motive, and the mentality of the criminal. Child molesters are sick and cannot be rehabilitated. Nor can serial killers and serial rapists. They're an obvious 'no.'

    Do you believe they should be held in prison until they die, or do you think the government should be investing in rehab programs? Depends on the crime obviously. Child molesters and serial killers should never be rehabilitated because they can't be.
    How would that affect the prison population? Not too badly since some of them should be put to death depending on the frequency and severity of their crimes.

    When does the death penalty come into play for you, if at all? Not sure where I stand on it being used in general, but I do think that some people don't deserve to have another breath on this planet.

    Does your opinion differ based on the crime? Why? Yes, some crimes are petty, or in the grey area as far as motive. Man kills woman for no real reason, shouldn't live another day. Man kills woman because she was coming at him with a chainsaw, huge difference obviously.
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    #3
    Interesting.

    How do you know that certain groups of people can't be rehabilitated? Can you link me to something I can read on the subject?

    TIA.

    I totally agree with the murder motives thing. Murder and self defense are very different.
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    #4
    Do you believe that criminals can be successfully reintroduced into society at some point? I believe that some groups can be, probably even the majority of people incarcerated.

    Do you believe they should be held in prison until they die, or do you think the government should be investing in rehab programs? I don't think any life should be wasted, so I think continued investment in rehab programs is the right thing to do. There is a higher failure right for some types of rehabilitation though (ie for those with antisocial personality disorder, pedophiles) so while I think research should continue in those areas, I also think that going through rehab shouldn't be an automatic ticket out of a prisoner's sentence. Just another step in preparing them to return to society, if possible.

    How would that affect the prison population? If successful rehab programs are implemented and completed more widely, I think it would lead to fewer minor offenders behind bars and more space for unrehabilitated or mroe dangerous criminals.

    When does the death penalty come into play for you, if at all? I do not believe in the death penalty. In this country we have the means to imprison people until the natural end of their lives if it is necessary for the safety of others...I believe taking away lives is not something humans should take into their hands unless absolutely necessary. It has been shown that the death penalty is applied unequally in this country.

    Does your opinion differ based on the crime? Why? Yes. Motive has a lot to do with it. So does the mental health/ state of the offender. In those cases, I think offenders should be serve their sentences in wards that can attend to their mental disorders--not released and expected to take care of themselves, or imprisoned without mental health care as many are for lack of funds, faciilities, doctors etc.
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    #5
    I will be interested to see where this thread goes. Alot of different opinions on this.
    I think there is a very high percentage of those who reoffend once out of prison but I have no idea who it is, what they did, or what have you.
    I do believe that serial criminals (rapists, killers, molesters) should be locked up once they reoffend...it's an obvious pattern that rehabilitation was not successful for them. For life, not sure???
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    Quote Originally Posted by leiawen View Post
    Do you believe that criminals can be successfully reintroduced into society at some point? I believe that some groups can be, probably even the majority of people incarcerated.

    Do you believe they should be held in prison until they die, or do you think the government should be investing in rehab programs? I don't think any life should be wasted, so I think continued investment in rehab programs is the right thing to do. There is a higher failure right for some types of rehabilitation though (ie for those with antisocial personality disorder, pedophiles) so while I think research should continue in those areas, I also think that going through rehab shouldn't be an automatic ticket out of a prisoner's sentence. Just another step in preparing them to return to society, if possible.

    How would that affect the prison population? If successful rehab programs are implemented and completed more widely, I think it would lead to fewer minor offenders behind bars and more space for unrehabilitated or mroe dangerous criminals.

    When does the death penalty come into play for you, if at all? I do not believe in the death penalty. In this country we have the means to imprison people until the natural end of their lives if it is necessary for the safety of others...I believe taking away lives is not something humans should take into their hands unless absolutely necessary. It has been shown that the death penalty is applied unequally in this country.

    Does your opinion differ based on the crime? Why? Yes. Motive has a lot to do with it. So does the mental health/ state of the offender. In those cases, I think offenders should be serve their sentences in wards that can attend to their mental disorders--not released and expected to take care of themselves, or imprisoned without mental health care as many are for lack of funds, faciilities, doctors etc.
    I basically agree with everything you said.

    The only differing point is, I do believe in the death penalty but only in cases where the criminal truly wants to die, and knows in their heart they can't change. I am also for assisted suicide, though, so I'm probably in the minority there.
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    #7
    I will say that it may be possible in SOME cases to rehab them, but it's not cost effective and I'm not willing to pay that price personally for a failed attempt at rehabbing scum.

    Excerpt from the journal 'Law and Human Behavior'
    http://www.springerlink.com/content/t0q5j523440j76u7/
    Abstract We address the high variability in sex offender recidivism rates by examining several of the critical methodological differences that underlie this variability. We used a dataset on 251 sex offenders (136 rapists and 115 child molesters) who were discharged over a 25-year period to examine changes in recidivism as a function of changes in dispositional definition of reoffense (e.g., arrest or conviction), changes in the domain of criminal offenses that are considered, and changes in the length of exposure time. The data indicate that: (a) both rapists and child molesters remain at risk to reoffend long after their discharge, in some cases 15–20 years after discharge; (b) there was a marked underestimation of recidivism when calculating a simple proportion (&#37 consisting of those who were known to have reoffended during the follow-up period, and (c) there was a marked underestimation of recidivism when the criterion was based on conviction or imprisonment. Forensic, clinical and policy implications of this high variability are discussed.
    http://www.vachss.com/av_dispatches/disp_9301_a.html

    A 1992 study of 767 rapists and child molesters in Minnesota found those who completed psychiatric treatment were arrested more often for new sex crimes than those who had not been treated at all.
    A Canadian survey that tracked released child molesters for 20 years revealed a 43 percent recidivism rate regardless of the therapy. The difference between those simply incarcerated and those subjected to a full range of treatments appears statistically negligible. And the more violent and sadistic the offense, the more likely it is to be repeated.
    http://www.mind-in-manchester.org.uk...or_badness.php
    Perhaps nothing is so damaging for psychiatric patients than the misconception of child molesters (paedophiles) as being mentally ill. While most of us feel that paedophiles must be 'sick' in the colloquial sense, they are almost never sick clinically.

    Paedophiles are no more likely than others to experience being mentally ill: "Paedophilia is not a mental illness, but is regarded as a 'disorder of sexual preference', to quote the World Health Organisation formulation" (Innocence in Danger, 2001). Essentially, paedophilia is just a sexual orientation. People with this orientation have the same moral choices as anyone else i.e. to behave with decency and restraint or to force onto others their preferred type of sex (Szasz, 2002).

    Paedophiles frequently claim that they themselves were abused, but as a leading forensic psychologist pointed out: "People do not become abusers and criminals because they were abused" (Samenow, 1998; p.39). According to NSPCC research huge numbers of people have experienced abuse or other victimisation in childhood (Clarke, 2000); however only a tiny percentage later choose to abuse other people.

    While we applaud efforts to stop paedophiles re-offending (it seems that a cognitive-behavioural approach - psycho-babble for getting offenders to change their thinking and acting - does meet with some success; although the statstically-aware will note that 're-conviction' is not the same as 're-offending' -see Player, 1992) we deplore the portrayal of sexual deviancy as mental illness.

    Significantly, the Wolvercote clinic -Britain's major 'treatment' centre for paedophiles - did not accept as patients people who were mentally ill: "Wolvercote does not accept men for intervention with current active mental illness..." (National Probation Service, p.2).

    Victims of Crime Trust spokesman Norman Brennan has reportedly said: "There is no medical cure of paedophiles. It beggars belief why they are released in the first place" (Hull, 2004).

    Paedophiles themselves have sometimes expressed scepticism about the feasibility of 'treatment'. As one convicted paedophile commented: "There has been a considerable amount of discussion recently about rehabilitating, even curing paedophiles. I do not believe this is possible. I am a paedophile" (Atherton, 2001).

    This suggests that sometimes sex offenders are more realistic than 'experts' about changing their behaviour: jailing for life sex-sadist Paul Beart (who horribly tortured a woman to death) Mrs Justice Hallet said she was "...astonished Beart managed to fool experts into believing he was not a risk". Beart had previously been jailed for five years but released after three, having "passed a sex offenders' rehabilitation course and posed as a model prisoner" (Lakeman, 2001).
    I have things to do or I would research more, but I have a homecoming to prepare for and lots of cleaning to do. I didn't even get to search out info on serial killers, but I will later if I have a chance.
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Loretta View Post
    I basically agree with everything you said.

    The only differing point is, I do believe in the death penalty but only in cases where the criminal truly wants to die, and knows in their heart they can't change. I am also for assisted suicide, though, so I'm probably in the minority there.
    I hear you. I do not agree with assisted suicide, but sometimes I go back and forth about the death penalty. I wonder sometimes if I would feel differently if my friend or family member had been the victim, if I would feel the criminal deserved to die. I don't know

    I really wish that there were more resources allotted for rehabilitation and reintegration services. I worked at a school with many kids who had parents or family in jail or prison--some of them had been in and out several times over their lives. I remember wishing that there had been more resources for those families, to help them help themselves, to break the cycle. And, in some cases, to keep them in and not let them be eligible for parole again just because the jails were getting full
  9. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    #9
    Thanks, Schaele! I will have a lot of reading to do when I log on later.

    I see you have very strong opinions to go with your research

    I'll be back after a while. Thanks for joining in the debate, guys!
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    #10
    I DO believe that rehabilitation is possible BUT I do not believe that it is very likely in OUR justice and prison systems. Leiwan said basically how I feel about the subject.
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