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Thread: Transgenders in 3rd grade!

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    Transgenders in 3rd grade!

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    I was going to post this in the just news thing but I know its probably going to be debated.
    I totally accept people that are gay but changing your body and teaching this to kids in elementary school, I don't know how I feel about this.

    http://www.9news.com/news/local/arti...?storyid=85989
    HIGHLANDS RANCH The issue of being transgender usually pops up with students in high school. However, a 2nd grade biological boy wants to dress as a girl and be addressed with a girl's name.

    "As a public school system, our calling is to educate all kids no matter where they come from, what their background is, beliefs, values, it doesn't matter," said Whei Wong, Douglas County Schools spokesperson.

    Wong says the staff at one of Douglas County's schools is preparing to accommodate the student and answer questions other students might have. In order to protect the child as much as possible, 9NEWS has chosen not to reveal his school or other names that might identify the child.

    "I see this as being a very difficult situation to explain to my daughter to explain why someone would not want to be the gender they were born with," said Dave M.

    His daughter will be in the same class as the student.

    The student had attended this same school in years prior, but had left to go to classes in another district for about two years. The transgender student will be returning to what is the child's home school. Dave M. thinks classmates will recognize the change.

    "I do think that there's going to be an acknowledgement that 'Why are you in a dress this year when you were in pants last year?'" said Dave M.

    Wong says teachers are planning to address the student by name instead of using he or she. The child will not use the regular boys or girls bathroom. Instead, two unisex bathrooms in the building will be made available. The school is handing out packets to parents who have questions. The packets contain information about people who are transgender.

    "I think it is unusual," said Wong. "It's something we haven't had discussions about before. It's something that we haven't maybe really had to think about before, but now we will."

    Family Therapist Larry Curry hopes the child and the child's parents are seeing a counselor just to be safe.

    "I am very concerned because with the guidelines in place, this is a very early age," said Curry. "I don't know too many parents who are equipped to answer that kind of question or deal with it without some other support."

    Kim Pearson says the family is getting support. She is the executive director of a national organization called TransYouth Family Advocates. The group has been working with the family and Douglas County Schools.

    "Initially there was a lot of resistance," said Pearson. "Now, their position is they want this child to be safe in their school."

    Pearson says their group is working with an increasing number of families nationwide who have elementary age transgender kids.

    "We know that families are more comfortable talking about this," she said. "There was no place for parents to go."

    Pearson says children as young as 5 years old are realizing their true gender identity and her group wants to help parents who may be resisting the acceptance of this.

    "Parents are likely to think this it's a phase, but how long do phases last?" said Pearson. "With these kids, it's something that's very consistent."

    That thought is not comforting to Dave M., who believes his daughter is not ready to think about the issue of being transgender.

    "I don't think a (2nd) grader does have the rationale to decide this life-altering choice," said Dave M.

    He is also unhappy with the way the school is handling this. The district has been preparing for the child's return to this school for months. Dave M. thinks other parents should have been made aware of this sooner.

    "I just find it ironic that they can dictate the dress style of children to make sure they don't wear inappropriate clothing, but they have no controls in place for someone wearing transgender clothing," said Dave M.

    Curry says parents like Dave M. should not bring the issue up to their students until they ask. However, he says parents should be ready to answer tough questions from the student's fellow third graders.

    "I think reassuring them and letting them know that they'll be alright. Their classmate is alright," said Curry. "This is something their classmate has chosen to do. It is not contagious."

    Pearson says the most important thing is to make sure the transgender student does not become the target of bullying or verbal abuse which can lead to suicide.

    "These children are at high-risk," said Pearson. "Our number one goal is to keep kids safe."

    Wong says mental health professionals will be available if students, staff, or parents have any concerns at all. She says the district views this as just another diversity issue and hopes everyone can accept and respect the student's wishes.

    "Our staff has been briefed and trained to look for concerns," said Wong.

    The family of the transgender student did not want to comment
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    #2
    The family of the transgender student did not want to comment
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    We had something similar in my grade growing up. Dawn honest to God looked like a boy. She played hockey, only had boy friends, had a boy haircut and in high school she came out, which was not a surprise. Lucky for her Dawn could be misunderstood as Don, so it was like she was a boy anyway, except when it came to using the restroom. I thought she was a boy for two years (she wasn't in my class, so I didn't know her personally). I think kids understand those types of things more than adults do, who are probably the only ones who would freak out about it.

    Although the stigma is different for a boy who wants to be a girl, I would think...

    it's just a tough situation in general. I'm glad they're being sensitive to it at least.
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    #4
    2nd grade?? Aren't you like 7 or 8..HE wants to be a SHE....I'm glad the school is making an effort to make the transition easy for the child and everyone else though but it boggles my mind that someone that young feels this way
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    yeah, sorry, failed to mention Dawn was like that in 2nd grade when I moved to that school. It's crazy, but I've heard people say they knew as young as 6,7,8 that they were LGBT.
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    #6
    I thank its wonderful that the school system is keeping an open mind and trying their best to accommodate the child and his family. I'm sure this isn't easy for anyone, but kids aren't stupid they know whats going on and who they are... JMO
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    Anyone that I have seen or heard talk about this issue said they knew their whole lives. I guess we are lucky enough to live in a time where the kid can be honest about it and not be scared of how they'll be treated. That is pretty amazing.
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    First i must say that i'm glad the school system is open to this kinda thing..
    Second though i wonder if the child is a true transgender or maybe just a hermaphrodite (i don't know if i'm spelling it correctly). If it's the latter I can understand fully why they would want to go as a certain gender rather than another. They may just have not had a chance to get the surgery ( i don't know if maybe you have to be a certain age).

    I don't know much about it...but it could also be another explaination and why the parents had no comment...

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    Quote Originally Posted by swymerfoote View Post
    We had something similar in my grade growing up. Dawn honest to God looked like a boy. She played hockey, only had boy friends, had a boy haircut and in high school she came out, which was not a surprise. Lucky for her Dawn could be misunderstood as Don, so it was like she was a boy anyway, except when it came to using the restroom. I thought she was a boy for two years (she wasn't in my class, so I didn't know her personally). I think kids understand those types of things more than adults do, who are probably the only ones who would freak out about it.

    Although the stigma is different for a boy who wants to be a girl, I would think...

    it's just a tough situation in general. I'm glad they're being sensitive to it at least.
    i pretty much agree with this comment... if it were a girl dressing like a boy and using a boy's name, it wouldn't get any attention. but since it's the reverse, its now news worthy.

    really, i think it's being handled well. whether or not the kid really knows if this is the right decision for his/her entire life isn't something we can ever really know, so i think treating it sensitively and not trying to stifle the child is the best response. i mean, i wouldn't want the parents jumping to schedule gender reassignment surgery at this point in time, but allowing their child to dress as a girl and go by a girls name seems harmless enough.
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by cloren1317 View Post
    First i must say that i'm glad the school system is open to this kinda thing..
    Second though i wonder if the child is a true transgender or maybe just a hermaphrodite (i don't know if i'm spelling it correctly). If it's the latter I can understand fully why they would want to go as a certain gender rather than another. They may just have not had a chance to get the surgery ( i don't know if maybe you have to be a certain age).

    I don't know much about it...but it could also be another explaination and why the parents had no comment...

    Hermaphrodite is a person with both male and female sex organs.

    Sounds like the child is transgendered. Born a male, trying to live life as a female. If he decides to have the surgery later on, he'll become a transexual.
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