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Thread: Shock Probabtion

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    Shock Probabtion

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    What do you think about it. Now I know of cases where the 1st time offender was released on shock probation when they were found guilty of manslaughter and rape. I really don't like the way this is used. Yes, I understand that our jails and prisons are over crowded. But, I also do not think that those that commit crimes such as manslaughter and rape should be released like this. Also, this is going before the Kentucky Senate tomorrow.

    Shock Probation
    Monday, May. 07,
    For many a first offender, the worst part of prison comes in those shocking first days behind bars. Stunned by the strip search on entering, the frightening, unfamiliar vastness of the prison and the long incarceration stretching ahead, the new inmate is overwhelmed. On the theory that the first taste of prison may have at least as much curative effect as the full dose, a few states, including Indiana and Ohio, have quietly been practicing what they call "shock probation."

    Eight months ago, Kentucky be came the latest state to try the experiment. Under its law, an offender sent to jail for a misdemeanor or felony may be granted probation by a judge after serving between 30 and 60 days. Not every applicant gets the early probation; one judge reports turning down ten requests for every one he grants. The procedure is generally used for first offenders in borderline cases where the judge has had a problem deciding whether to commit a man at all.

    So far, 101 Kentucky prisoners have been released on shock probation. Of them, only three have been returned to prison. One Viet Nam veteran who faced a year for selling amphetamines got out after two months and claims, "There is no chance I'll ever be in trouble again." A 19-year-old sentenced to ten years for selling heroin was surprised by "how good they all were to me the judge, the public defender, every one." Says his mother: "We thought we had lost him completely."

    Those preliminary results parallel the experience of Ohio, the first state to try the shock-probation process. There, 4,014 prisoners have been released after serving only two or three months since the plan went into effect in 1966. Only 9% of them have had to go back to jail while the national recidivism rate is estimated as from 65% to 80%.
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    I actually agree with it in those cases the article talked about. If you send a first time offender to prison long term they will learn how to become a better offender. (most times) this way they let them out while they are still scared, have not formed any gang buddies, they know they don't want to go back , AND they are not yet crippled in that they know no other way of living except behind bars.

    look at the numbers and you can see it works far more effectively at KEEPING them one time offenders then doing hard time.
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    I agrre with it to but there always has to be some discretion to the cases!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green~Mammy View Post
    I actually agree with it in those cases the article talked about. If you send a first time offender to prison long term they will learn how to become a better offender. (most times) this way they let them out while they are still scared, have not formed any gang buddies, they know they don't want to go back , AND they are not yet crippled in that they know no other way of living except behind bars.

    look at the numbers and you can see it works far more effectively at KEEPING them one time offenders then doing hard time.
    I agree. My husband served time in prison for DUI Manslaughter. He has told me that Inmates LEARN how to become Criminals in prison. There should be a difference between the type of confinement a first time offender and a repeat offender receive.

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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Green~Mammy View Post
    I actually agree with it in those cases the article talked about. If you send a first time offender to prison long term they will learn how to become a better offender. (most times) this way they let them out while they are still scared, have not formed any gang buddies, they know they don't want to go back , AND they are not yet crippled in that they know no other way of living except behind bars.

    look at the numbers and you can see it works far more effectively at KEEPING them one time offenders then doing hard time.
    Quote Originally Posted by parkwoodmom View Post
    I agree. My husband served time in prison for DUI Manslaughter. He has told me that Inmates LEARN how to become Criminals in prison. There should be a difference between the type of confinement a first time offender and a repeat offender receive.
    TOTALLY agree with both of you. Took the words right out of my mouth.
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    I have NO issues with it being used for "petty" crimes. But when a judge can and does use this for those that have been found guility of manslaughter or rape, that is my line in the sand so to speak. My feeling is that this practice needs to have WAY more restrictions on it than what it has or it needs to stop all together.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donna View Post
    I have NO issues with it being used for "petty" crimes. But when a judge can and does use this for those that have been found guility of manslaughter or rape, that is my line in the sand so to speak. My feeling is that this practice needs to have WAY more restrictions on it than what it has or it needs to stop all together.
    I agree.

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    This is from an email that I got. This is the mother emailing. The email list is for those that have lost a child. She is trying to get the law about shock probation changed to be stricter in that those with serious crimes such as manslaughter and rape, that this practice can not be used.

    My son was killed by a drunk driver here in KY. Ricky was killed in 2002. The
    offender was sent to prison but was released on shock probation 6
    months after entering. He was a repeat DUI offender.

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