Military Significant Others and Spouse Support - MilitarySOS.com
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36

Thread: Citizenship, does it give you any qualifications?

  1. ash
    i love the red sox
    ash's Avatar
    ash is offline
    i love the red sox
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    15,177
    Blog Entries
    1
    #1

    Citizenship, does it give you any qualifications?

    Advertisements
    I am hoping this stays civil given the number of people we have on this site that are not citizens/recently became citizens.

    In class this morning, a student who is from Poland and is waiting on his citizenship interview discussed his experiences in a prison camp in Syria when he was fighting with the US military in 2003-2004.

    He explained how he was forced to kill people who were shackled to the ground if they made an attempt to move AT ALL. He said how scarred he is from this and how demoralizing it was for him to kill people who had no weapons or any way to harm him. He described it like killing a baby.

    I find his story and those of others who work at military prison camps to be frightening and disheartening. But that is neither here nor there. After he finished speaking about how he then lost his faith in the Bush administration of which he had been a major supporter, in fact this was the reason he went to war for the United States.

    Another student in my class said "I am not going to respond, I am sick and tired of hearing my president questioned"

    I pointed out that this is one of the joys of a democratic society, but no one really cared

    Then, and this is what kills me, a student said "dude, shut up, no one cares what you have to say, you are not even a citizen"

    This was said to a man who has gone to war for this country, who is no enduring the horrors of PTSD, has lost his wife over the PTSD and was told his views of the war and torture do not matter as he is not a citizen.

    I find the account of someone who was there first hand to be more of a quality opinion than a boy who still lives at home and has never, and probably will never, be in a war. I am sure that the student who said it will lose a letter grade in the class as on the syllabus it states that is the consequence for personal attack.

    I guess the questions is, do you think that someone who lives here, but is not a citizen has the same rights as you or I, to question the government? Futhermore, do you think someone who has fought for us in a war should have a smoother path to citizenship?
    this is like a bad movie, and i'd give it a 5 on my netflix
  2. Account Closed
    Sophie♥Hatter's Avatar
    Sophie♥Hatter is offline
    Account Closed
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    25,685
    #2
    I think that is a very sad & heart breaking story. I don't think it SHOULD but many even on here feel the same way. That if you are trying to become a citizen you need to just shut up, bend over, and take it. I don't think that is right at all. i think everyone should have the right to say how they feel about a situation with out having where they were or were not by sheer luck born thrown in their face.

    Rather then get hung up on the fact that he is not a born citizen they SHOULD of paid far more attention to the truth coming out of his mouth about what he witnessed first hand.

    as for the last YES he fought for this country he deserves to be a citizen with out getting hung up in the system for years. I feel the same way for AD members that marry a nonAmerican. They are SERVING this country things should be a tad smoother on getting their wives made a citizen.
  3. Senior Member
    Germanchick's Avatar
    Germanchick is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    36,763
    Blog Entries
    4
    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by ash View Post
    I guess the questions is, do you think that someone who lives here, but is not a citizen has the same rights as you or I, to question the government? Futhermore, do you think someone who has fought for us in a war should have a smoother path to citizenship?
    Yes and yes. I think that since the world as a whole is becoming more and more connected and since things the US does often times not only affects what happens here but has affects all over the world, we have the responsibility as world citizens to question not only what happens in out own but also in other countries.

    I think it is a shame that he still has to fight all this red tape after having served with the US military.

    But my opnion might be just slightly biased. There have been too many times when I have been told that I have no right to question what the US administration does, And too many times when I have been told to 'just leave' if I don't like things the way they are. And too many problems in getting my VISA.
    An unconditional right to say what one pleases about public affairs is what I consider to be the minimum guarantee of the First Amendment.
  4. ash
    i love the red sox
    ash's Avatar
    ash is offline
    i love the red sox
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    15,177
    Blog Entries
    1
    #4
    I wonder if anyone feels the opposite?

    I really want to know the rationale. I personally, enjoy hearing the opinions of people from other countries, I think it is important to know what the world's perceptions are.

    It really broke my heart to hear the exchange in my class this morning
    this is like a bad movie, and i'd give it a 5 on my netflix
  5. Senior Member
    Germanchick's Avatar
    Germanchick is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    36,763
    Blog Entries
    4
    #5
    I think it is interesting that this thread has 31 views but so few replies.
    An unconditional right to say what one pleases about public affairs is what I consider to be the minimum guarantee of the First Amendment.
  6. Account Closed
    Devinn's Avatar
    Devinn is offline
    Account Closed
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,001
    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by germanchick View Post
    I think it is interesting that this thread has 31 views but so few replies.
    I think that's not unlike any other thread in this forum.

    Although, I'm fairly sure no one wants to get wrapped up in such a touchy subject....I know I don't. This is one of those subjects that if not handled carefully or worded just right could cause major drama.
  7. Senior Member
    ChewiesBaby's Avatar
    ChewiesBaby is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hometown
    Posts
    4,139
    Blog Entries
    1
    #7
    I'm just now seeing this. I think that the citizens have more say in what goes on because they have the right to vote for who and what goes on here. People can questions all day 'til the cows come home whatever they want whenever they want BUT if it truly means that much to them then they need to do whatever it takes to get citizenship and do something about it. I can gripe all I want about other countries and their policy's and their ideals but I'm not LIVING there or trying to get citizenship there. What I think upsets so many is the fact that we have an unbelievable amount of illegal immigrants here in the country who hate how it's run and gripe this or that but love the luxuries & benefits that this country provides. Some people may equate it to biting the hand that feeds you. Truly though, if you want to make a change and become a citizen then great otherwise I don't see much point in bitching about the country you personally call home yet don't pay taxes in or vote in unless you are just like it up there on the soapbox.

    This guy that is being referred to in this thread though is actively trying to get his visa, he's served beside the military of this country (not sure if he was IN the US military or not, confused on that) so it seems he wants to be proactive in making the changes that he feels would help out this country. I think that's commendable.
  8. Amazon nut & Supernatural freak.
    shape shifter's Avatar
    shape shifter is offline
    Amazon nut & Supernatural freak.
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    15,086
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by ash View Post
    I am hoping this stays civil given the number of people we have on this site that are not citizens/recently became citizens.

    In class this morning, a student who is from Poland and is waiting on his citizenship interview discussed his experiences in a prison camp in Syria when he was fighting with the US military in 2003-2004.

    He explained how he was forced to kill people who were shackled to the ground if they made an attempt to move AT ALL. He said how scarred he is from this and how demoralizing it was for him to kill people who had no weapons or any way to harm him. He described it like killing a baby.

    I find his story and those of others who work at military prison camps to be frightening and disheartening. But that is neither here nor there. After he finished speaking about how he then lost his faith in the Bush administration of which he had been a major supporter, in fact this was the reason he went to war for the United States.

    Another student in my class said "I am not going to respond, I am sick and tired of hearing my president questioned"

    I pointed out that this is one of the joys of a democratic society, but no one really cared

    Then, and this is what kills me, a student said "dude, shut up, no one cares what you have to say, you are not even a citizen"

    This was said to a man who has gone to war for this country, who is no enduring the horrors of PTSD, has lost his wife over the PTSD and was told his views of the war and torture do not matter as he is not a citizen.

    I find the account of someone who was there first hand to be more of a quality opinion than a boy who still lives at home and has never, and probably will never, be in a war. I am sure that the student who said it will lose a letter grade in the class as on the syllabus it states that is the consequence for personal attack.

    I guess the questions is, do you think that someone who lives here, but is not a citizen has the same rights as you or I, to question the government? Futhermore, do you think someone who has fought for us in a war should have a smoother path to citizenship?
    This is a very sad story, it is someone's story of misfortune and sorrow. I think that is what hurts more.

    From what I know, foreign citizens who serve in the US Military after a year of honorable service have the rights to American citizenship. I saw some news about this on AFN and there is also a commercial about it.

    Best wishes to this man.
  9. MilitarySOS Jewel
    LittleMsSunshine's Avatar
    LittleMsSunshine is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    21,797
    #9
    You have some serious assholes in that class. Those kinds of insensitive, ignorant comments would make me want to fly across the desk and choke somebody.

    Of COURSE the man has a right to have an opinion. Why would him not being an American citizen take away his basic human right to think? That's the biggest load of shit I think I've ever heard. (Not you, Ash, the guy who made the comment in your class)

    I doubt ANY of us have faced the awful things that man has at the hands of a government. Still, the fact that he wants to be an American citizen, even after what he went through.... says a lot about our country- government aside.

    And yes, I DO think that people who have fought FOR us should have an easier time being granted citizenship.
  10. Senior Member
    itchywitch's Avatar
    itchywitch is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Twentynine Palms
    Posts
    2,735
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ChewiesBaby View Post
    I'm just now seeing this. I think that the citizens have more say in what goes on because they have the right to vote for who and what goes on here. People can questions all day 'til the cows come home whatever they want whenever they want BUT if it truly means that much to them then they need to do whatever it takes to get citizenship and do something about it. I can gripe all I want about other countries and their policy's and their ideals but I'm not LIVING there or trying to get citizenship there. What I think upsets so many is the fact that we have an unbelievable amount of illegal immigrants here in the country who hate how it's run and gripe this or that but love the luxuries & benefits that this country provides. Some people may equate it to biting the hand that feeds you. Truly though, if you want to make a change and become a citizen then great otherwise I don't see much point in bitching about the country you personally call home yet don't pay taxes in or vote in unless you are just like it up there on the soapbox.

    This guy that is being referred to in this thread though is actively trying to get his visa, he's served beside the military of this country (not sure if he was IN the US military or not, confused on that) so it seems he wants to be proactive in making the changes that he feels would help out this country. I think that's commendable.
    I agree with the bolded parts


    No one is guaranteed happiness. You can pursue it, but if you happen to find success along the way on that road to happiness, Conservatives believe you should not be demonized or penalized for it.
    Glenn Beck
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •