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Thread: Reading List 2019 - 52 Books in 52 Weeks, Read Around The World and Other Challenges

  1. "...now do Classical Gas"
    Matchbox's Avatar
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    #21
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    The list continues.


    1: El Ingenioso Hildalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha, by Miguel de Cervantes. A man reads so many stories about great knights that he goes a little mad and decides he HAS to be one.

    2: Río Subterráneo (Underground River) by Inés Arredondo. A book of short stories.

    3: Queen Kat, Carmel and St Jude Get A Life by Maureen McCarthy. Three girls from a small country town have very little in common, but share a house in the city as they start university. Carmel is shy, overweight and needs with all her soul to be anywhere that isn’t the family farm. Jude lives with her dead father’s ghost and is totally okay with that, thanks. Katerina is rich, beautiful, ambitious and thinks she’ll be just fine...until she’s not.

    4: Sagittarius Rising by Cecil Lewis. The author’s account of life as one of the very, VERY early fighter pilots with the Royal Flying Corps, over the Western Front in WW1.

    5: The Confession of Brother Haluin by Ellis Peters. A monk falls from the roof of Shrewsbury Abbey. The accident leaves him so shattered that no one thinks he can possibly live, so he makes a deathbed confession seeking absolution for the death of a young girl he once loved. Fifteenth of the Cadfael books.

    6: La Villa (Shantytown) by César Aira. Maxi is strong as a bull, but not so bright, and for lack of any other real purpose this solidly middle class boy spends his time helping the trash pickers of a Buenos Aires shantytown. A corrupt, trigger-happy policeman can’t figure him out, and eventually pins the blame on him for a drug ring operating out of the slum’s heart.

    7: El Cielo Árido (The Arid Sky) by Emiliano Monge. Interesting structure, but it didn’t entirely grab me. Not surprised, since if this reminds me of anyone it’s probably Cormac McCarthy, and Cormac McCarthy doesn’t often grab me in English either.

    8: Cafe Scheherazade by Arnold Zable. A collection that might be short stories, or they might be a memoir...he says it’s fiction, but if it is then the layer of fiction laid over truth must be very, very thin.

    9: The Odyssey as translated by Emily Wilson. Let me tell you about a complicated man...

    10: Eva Luna by Isabel Allende. There is a storyteller. She is the story.

    11: The Tiger’s Wife by Tea Obreht. What? Matchbox is reading magical realism that ISN’T from South America?!

    12: The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham. An English village begins to realise that there’s something wrong with their children...

    13: The Heretic’s Apprentice by Ellis Peters. A pilgrim returning from Jerusalem arrives in Shrewsbury to some very serious charges of heresy. Sixteenth of the Cadfael books.

    14: The White Mouse by Nancy Wake. An autobiography of a French Resistance fighter who for a while topped the Gestapo’s most-wanted list

    15: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Because it is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife...

    16: Mort Cinder by Héctor Germán Oesterheld and Alberto Brecchia. There is a man who cannot die. Every time he dies, is buried and then wakes up in his grave and begins all over again. One lifetime of being a witness to the worst of humanity is bad enough, but this man has seen almost all of human history. I LOVE this comic.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  2. "...now do Classical Gas"
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    #22
    The list continues.


    1: El Ingenioso Hildalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha, by Miguel de Cervantes. A man reads so many stories about great knights that he goes a little mad and decides he HAS to be one.

    2: Río Subterráneo (Underground River) by Inés Arredondo. A book of short stories.

    3: Queen Kat, Carmel and St Jude Get A Life by Maureen McCarthy. Three girls from a small country town have very little in common, but share a house in the city as they start university. Carmel is shy, overweight and needs with all her soul to be anywhere that isn’t the family farm. Jude lives with her dead father’s ghost and is totally okay with that, thanks. Katerina is rich, beautiful, ambitious and thinks she’ll be just fine...until she’s not.

    4: Sagittarius Rising by Cecil Lewis. The author’s account of life as one of the very, VERY early fighter pilots with the Royal Flying Corps, over the Western Front in WW1.

    5: The Confession of Brother Haluin by Ellis Peters. A monk falls from the roof of Shrewsbury Abbey. The accident leaves him so shattered that no one thinks he can possibly live, so he makes a deathbed confession seeking absolution for the death of a young girl he once loved. Fifteenth of the Cadfael books.

    6: La Villa (Shantytown) by César Aira. Maxi is strong as a bull, but not so bright, and for lack of any other real purpose this solidly middle class boy spends his time helping the trash pickers of a Buenos Aires shantytown. A corrupt, trigger-happy policeman can’t figure him out, and eventually pins the blame on him for a drug ring operating out of the slum’s heart.

    7: El Cielo Árido (The Arid Sky) by Emiliano Monge. Interesting structure, but it didn’t entirely grab me. Not surprised, since if this reminds me of anyone it’s probably Cormac McCarthy, and Cormac McCarthy doesn’t often grab me in English either.

    8: Cafe Scheherazade by Arnold Zable. A collection that might be short stories, or they might be a memoir...he says it’s fiction, but if it is then the layer of fiction laid over truth must be very, very thin.

    9: The Odyssey as translated by Emily Wilson. Let me tell you about a complicated man...

    10: Eva Luna by Isabel Allende. There is a storyteller. She is the story.

    11: The Tiger’s Wife by Tea Obreht. What? Matchbox is reading magical realism that ISN’T from South America?!

    12: The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham. An English village begins to realise that there’s something wrong with their children...

    13: The Heretic’s Apprentice by Ellis Peters. A pilgrim returning from Jerusalem arrives in Shrewsbury to some very serious charges of heresy. Sixteenth of the Cadfael books.

    14: The White Mouse by Nancy Wake. An autobiography of a French Resistance fighter who for a while topped the Gestapo’s most-wanted list

    15: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Because it is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife...

    16: Mort Cinder by Héctor Germán Oesterheld and Alberto Brecchia. There is a man who cannot die. Every time he dies, is buried and then wakes up in his grave and begins all over again. One lifetime of being a witness to the worst of humanity is bad enough, but this man has seen almost all of human history. I LOVE this comic.

    17: A Year in Provence by Peter Mayle. Exactly what it says on the tin.

    18: The Far Pavilions by M. M. Kaye. Ridiculous sweeping melodrama along Pakistan’s North West Frontier. The Indian servant Ashok is also Ashton the English officer is also Akbar the Pashto tribesman. Being three men at once is not easy.

    19: Death Comes To Pemberley by P. D. James. I read Pride and Prejudice earlier this year, and this was one of the more entertaining sequels.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  3. Regular Member
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    #23
    15. The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference - Malcolm Gladwell
    16. The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman: Young Adult book, would recommend
    17. The Perfect Nanny - Leila Slimani
    18. Triptych - Karin Slaughter
    19. Undone - Karin Slaughter
  4. "...now do Classical Gas"
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    "...now do Classical Gas"
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    #24
    The list continues.


    1: El Ingenioso Hildalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha, by Miguel de Cervantes. A man reads so many stories about great knights that he goes a little mad and decides he HAS to be one.

    2: Río Subterráneo (Underground River) by Inés Arredondo. A book of short stories.

    3: Queen Kat, Carmel and St Jude Get A Life by Maureen McCarthy. Three girls from a small country town have very little in common, but share a house in the city as they start university. Carmel is shy, overweight and needs with all her soul to be anywhere that isn’t the family farm. Jude lives with her dead father’s ghost and is totally okay with that, thanks. Katerina is rich, beautiful, ambitious and thinks she’ll be just fine...until she’s not.

    4: Sagittarius Rising by Cecil Lewis. The author’s account of life as one of the very, VERY early fighter pilots with the Royal Flying Corps, over the Western Front in WW1.

    5: The Confession of Brother Haluin by Ellis Peters. A monk falls from the roof of Shrewsbury Abbey. The accident leaves him so shattered that no one thinks he can possibly live, so he makes a deathbed confession seeking absolution for the death of a young girl he once loved. Fifteenth of the Cadfael books.

    6: La Villa (Shantytown) by César Aira. Maxi is strong as a bull, but not so bright, and for lack of any other real purpose this solidly middle class boy spends his time helping the trash pickers of a Buenos Aires shantytown. A corrupt, trigger-happy policeman can’t figure him out, and eventually pins the blame on him for a drug ring operating out of the slum’s heart.

    7: El Cielo Árido (The Arid Sky) by Emiliano Monge. Interesting structure, but it didn’t entirely grab me. Not surprised, since if this reminds me of anyone it’s probably Cormac McCarthy, and Cormac McCarthy doesn’t often grab me in English either.

    8: Cafe Scheherazade by Arnold Zable. A collection that might be short stories, or they might be a memoir...he says it’s fiction, but if it is then the layer of fiction laid over truth must be very, very thin.

    9: The Odyssey as translated by Emily Wilson. Let me tell you about a complicated man...

    10: Eva Luna by Isabel Allende. There is a storyteller. She is the story.

    11: The Tiger’s Wife by Tea Obreht. What? Matchbox is reading magical realism that ISN’T from South America?!

    12: The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham. An English village begins to realise that there’s something wrong with their children...

    13: The Heretic’s Apprentice by Ellis Peters. A pilgrim returning from Jerusalem arrives in Shrewsbury to some very serious charges of heresy. Sixteenth of the Cadfael books.

    14: The White Mouse by Nancy Wake. An autobiography of a French Resistance fighter who for a while topped the Gestapo’s most-wanted list

    15: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Because it is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife...

    16: Mort Cinder by Héctor Germán Oesterheld and Alberto Brecchia. There is a man who cannot die. Every time he dies, is buried and then wakes up in his grave and begins all over again. One lifetime of being a witness to the worst of humanity is bad enough, but this man has seen almost all of human history. I LOVE this comic.

    17: A Year in Provence by Peter Mayle. Exactly what it says on the tin.

    18: The Far Pavilions by M. M. Kaye. Ridiculous sweeping melodrama along Pakistan’s North West Frontier. The Indian servant Ashok is also Ashton the English officer is also Akbar the Pashto tribesman. Being three men at once is not easy.

    19: Death Comes To Pemberley by P. D. James. I read Pride and Prejudice earlier this year, and this was one of the more entertaining sequels.

    20: The Potter’s Field by Ellis Peters. Shrewsbury Abbey comes into possession of a new piece of land. The body of a young woman is found in an unmarked grave on it, and no one seems to know who she is or how she got there. Seventeenth of the Cadfael books.

    21: Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges. God I love Borges. There has never been a better short story writer.

    22: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy by John le Carré. There may be a mole inside MI6, but the trouble with catching him is the difficulty of spying on the spies.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  5. "...now do Classical Gas"
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    Matchbox is offline
    "...now do Classical Gas"
    Join Date
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    #25
    The list continues.


    1: El Ingenioso Hildalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha, by Miguel de Cervantes. A man reads so many stories about great knights that he goes a little mad and decides he HAS to be one.

    2: Río Subterráneo (Underground River) by Inés Arredondo. A book of short stories.

    3: Queen Kat, Carmel and St Jude Get A Life by Maureen McCarthy. Three girls from a small country town have very little in common, but share a house in the city as they start university. Carmel is shy, overweight and needs with all her soul to be anywhere that isn’t the family farm. Jude lives with her dead father’s ghost and is totally okay with that, thanks. Katerina is rich, beautiful, ambitious and thinks she’ll be just fine...until she’s not.

    4: Sagittarius Rising by Cecil Lewis. The author’s account of life as one of the very, VERY early fighter pilots with the Royal Flying Corps, over the Western Front in WW1.

    5: The Confession of Brother Haluin by Ellis Peters. A monk falls from the roof of Shrewsbury Abbey. The accident leaves him so shattered that no one thinks he can possibly live, so he makes a deathbed confession seeking absolution for the death of a young girl he once loved. Fifteenth of the Cadfael books.

    6: La Villa (Shantytown) by César Aira. Maxi is strong as a bull, but not so bright, and for lack of any other real purpose this solidly middle class boy spends his time helping the trash pickers of a Buenos Aires shantytown. A corrupt, trigger-happy policeman can’t figure him out, and eventually pins the blame on him for a drug ring operating out of the slum’s heart.

    7: El Cielo Árido (The Arid Sky) by Emiliano Monge. Interesting structure, but it didn’t entirely grab me. Not surprised, since if this reminds me of anyone it’s probably Cormac McCarthy, and Cormac McCarthy doesn’t often grab me in English either.

    8: Cafe Scheherazade by Arnold Zable. A collection that might be short stories, or they might be a memoir...he says it’s fiction, but if it is then the layer of fiction laid over truth must be very, very thin.

    9: The Odyssey as translated by Emily Wilson. Let me tell you about a complicated man...

    10: Eva Luna by Isabel Allende. There is a storyteller. She is the story.

    11: The Tiger’s Wife by Tea Obreht. What? Matchbox is reading magical realism that ISN’T from South America?!

    12: The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham. An English village begins to realise that there’s something wrong with their children...

    13: The Heretic’s Apprentice by Ellis Peters. A pilgrim returning from Jerusalem arrives in Shrewsbury to some very serious charges of heresy. Sixteenth of the Cadfael books.

    14: The White Mouse by Nancy Wake. An autobiography of a French Resistance fighter who for a while topped the Gestapo’s most-wanted list

    15: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Because it is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife...

    16: Mort Cinder by Héctor Germán Oesterheld and Alberto Brecchia. There is a man who cannot die. Every time he dies, is buried and then wakes up in his grave and begins all over again. One lifetime of being a witness to the worst of humanity is bad enough, but this man has seen almost all of human history. I LOVE this comic.

    17: A Year in Provence by Peter Mayle. Exactly what it says on the tin.

    18: The Far Pavilions by M. M. Kaye. Ridiculous sweeping melodrama along Pakistan’s North West Frontier. The Indian servant Ashok is also Ashton the English officer is also Akbar the Pashto tribesman. Being three men at once is not easy.

    19: Death Comes To Pemberley by P. D. James. I read Pride and Prejudice earlier this year, and this was one of the more entertaining sequels.

    20: The Potter’s Field by Ellis Peters. Shrewsbury Abbey comes into possession of a new piece of land. The body of a young woman is found in an unmarked grave on it, and no one seems to know who she is or how she got there. Seventeenth of the Cadfael books.

    21: Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges. God I love Borges. There has never been a better short story writer.

    22: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy by John le Carré. There may be a mole inside MI6, but the trouble with catching him is the difficulty of spying on the spies.

    23: The Honourable Schoolboy by John le Carré. They caught the mole, and he’s now dead. Now they have to rebuild a thoroughly shattered intelligence service - thirty years of being hollowed out from the inside leaves a mark - and start backtracking to see what they can find out about his handler, the Soviet spymaster Karla.

    24: Smiley’s People by John le Carré. The last face off between Karla and Smiley.

    25: H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald. After the death of her father, a woman buries her grief in training a goshawk. This was...I don’t know what this was. Nuanced, layered, fascinating. Brilliant.

    26: La Catedral del Mar (Cathedral of the Sea) by Ildefonso Falcones. There’s a TV adaptation of this waiting on my Netflix list, so I wanted to read it before I started watching it. Basically it’s Pillars of the Earth, but in Spain.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
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