Military Significant Others and Spouse Support - MilitarySOS.com
Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 74

Thread: 52 Books in 52 weeks 2018!

  1. MilitarySOS Jewel
    lavender_jane's Avatar
    lavender_jane is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,246
    Lv. Percent
    16.66%

    #31
    Advertisements
    Month Two
    9. The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick
    10. Silver Sparrow by Tayari Jones
    11. The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin
    12. Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling
    13. This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America by Morgan Jerkins
    14. Hunger: A Memior of (My) Body by Roxane Gay
  2. "...now do Classical Gas"
    Matchbox's Avatar
    Matchbox is offline
    "...now do Classical Gas"
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,153
    Lv. Percent
    25.34%
    #32
    1: It by Stephen King. If I didn’t have issues with clowns before...

    2: Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. A memoir of the author’s time flying remote mail routes for Aeropostale...including a middle-of-the-Sahara crash in 1935 which almost killed him. Wildly poetic and absolutely beautiful.

    3: The Leper of Saint Giles by Ellis Peters. The Benedictine abbey of Shrewsbury prepares to conduct a marriage between a young and beautiful heiress and a much older, cruel man. It becomes apparent very quickly that she’s being pushed into this wedding against her will; the one she REALLY wants is one of her new husband’s young squires. When the groom dies a violent death shortly before the wedding, this hothead boy is the prime suspect. Fifth of the Cadfael books.

    4: Iraq + 100: Stories From a Century After the Invasion edited by Hassan Blasim. A collection of short stories. Ask a group of Iraqi writers (some expats, some still living there) what they think Iraq might look like in 2103, exactly one hundred years after the Americans came...this is what you get.

    5: Das Reboot: How German Soccer Reinvented Itself and Conquered the World by Raphael Honigstein. Because there’s just not enough obsessing about football in my life.

    6: The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. LeGuin. She died recently, so it seemed appropriate. There is a man who dreams, and his dreams can change reality.

    7: The Yiddish Policeman’s Union by Michael Chabon. The Sitka District has existed for sixty years, as a “temporary” safe haven for Jews after the revelations of the Holocaust and the bloody stillbirth of Israel in 1948. Now, time is running out for the Sitka Jews, as Sitka was never made permanent and is due to return to Alaskan control. The coming Reversion is giving Meyer Landsman more problems than he likes; not only is he a homicide detective whose jurisdiction won’t exist three months from now, but there’s been a very weird murder. A heroin addict using a name that can’t possibly be real, who ties off his arm with tefillin, and who the more strictly devout of Sitka seem to think might even have been Tzaddik Ha-Dor - the Righteous Man, the Messiah who can rebuild Jerusalem’s Temple. These are strange, strange times to be a Jew...

    8: Harry Potter y la Piedra Filosofal by J. K. Rowling. I’ve been reading this with my kids. Yes, it’s in Spanish. I don’t own it in English. No, points will not be awarded for guessing which book this is when it’s at home

    9: The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create The World’s Great Drinks by Amy Stewart. Exactly what it says on the tin, a wander through everything from the agave that ferments into tequila to the cinchona bark that flavours a gin and tonic (it’s in the tonic water) to the saffron infusion in Benedictine.

    10: The Virgin In The Ice by Ellis Peters. November 1139, the city of Worcester is sacked. Among the survivors who fled was a Benedictine nun and the two teenagers in her care, but all three of them have vanished. The body of a young woman is found, frozen into the ice of a stream, but if that’s one of the missing three then where are the others? Sixth of the Cadfael books.

    11: Harry Potter y la Cámara Secreta by J. K. Rowling. More Spanish, more Hogwarts. My kids are loving this, but the second book is not my favourite of the series.
    Last edited by Matchbox; 03-11-2018 at 06:41 PM.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  3. MilitarySOS Jewel
    lavender_jane's Avatar
    lavender_jane is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,246
    Lv. Percent
    16.66%

    #33
    Month Three
    15. Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman
    16. The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood
    17. Artemis by Andy Weir
  4. "...now do Classical Gas"
    Matchbox's Avatar
    Matchbox is offline
    "...now do Classical Gas"
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,153
    Lv. Percent
    25.34%
    #34
    1: It by Stephen King. If I didn’t have issues with clowns before...

    2: Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. A memoir of the author’s time flying remote mail routes for Aeropostale...including a middle-of-the-Sahara crash in 1935 which almost killed him. Wildly poetic and absolutely beautiful.

    3: The Leper of Saint Giles by Ellis Peters. The Benedictine abbey of Shrewsbury prepares to conduct a marriage between a young and beautiful heiress and a much older, cruel man. It becomes apparent very quickly that she’s being pushed into this wedding against her will; the one she REALLY wants is one of her new husband’s young squires. When the groom dies a violent death shortly before the wedding, this hothead boy is the prime suspect. Fifth of the Cadfael books.

    4: Iraq + 100: Stories From a Century After the Invasion edited by Hassan Blasim. A collection of short stories. Ask a group of Iraqi writers (some expats, some still living there) what they think Iraq might look like in 2103, exactly one hundred years after the Americans came...this is what you get.

    5: Das Reboot: How German Soccer Reinvented Itself and Conquered the World by Raphael Honigstein. Because there’s just not enough obsessing about football in my life.

    6: The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. LeGuin. She died recently, so it seemed appropriate. There is a man who dreams, and his dreams can change reality.

    7: The Yiddish Policeman’s Union by Michael Chabon. The Sitka District has existed for sixty years, as a “temporary” safe haven for Jews after the revelations of the Holocaust and the bloody stillbirth of Israel in 1948. Now, time is running out for the Sitka Jews, as Sitka was never made permanent and is due to return to Alaskan control. The coming Reversion is giving Meyer Landsman more problems than he likes; not only is he a homicide detective whose jurisdiction won’t exist three months from now, but there’s been a very weird murder. A heroin addict using a name that can’t possibly be real, who ties off his arm with tefillin, and who the more strictly devout of Sitka seem to think might even have been Tzaddik Ha-Dor - the Righteous Man, the Messiah who can rebuild Jerusalem’s Temple. These are strange, strange times to be a Jew...

    8: Harry Potter y la Piedra Filosofal by J. K. Rowling. I’ve been reading this with my kids. Yes, it’s in Spanish. I don’t own it in English. No, points will not be awarded for guessing which book this is when it’s at home

    9: The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create The World’s Great Drinks by Amy Stewart. Exactly what it says on the tin, a wander through everything from the agave that ferments into tequila to the cinchona bark that flavours a gin and tonic (it’s in the tonic water) to the saffron infusion in Benedictine.

    10: The Virgin In The Ice by Ellis Peters. November 1139, the city of Worcester is sacked. Among the survivors who fled was a Benedictine nun and the two teenagers in her care, but all three of them have vanished. The body of a young woman is found, frozen into the ice of a stream, but if that’s one of the missing three then where are the others? Sixth of the Cadfael books.

    11: Harry Potter y la Cámara Secreta by J. K. Rowling. More Spanish, more Hogwarts. My kids are loving this, but the second book is not my favourite of the series.

    12: Bestiario (Bestiary) by Julio Cortázar. A book of short stories.

    13: The Monkey’s Mask by Dorothy Porter. This is...interesting. Unusual. It’s a fairly normal thriller about a young woman’s death, but it’s also poetry. The entire story is told in a sequence of poems, simultaneously lush and crude and savage.
    Last edited by Matchbox; 03-12-2018 at 06:27 AM.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  5. MilitarySOS Jewel
    lavender_jane's Avatar
    lavender_jane is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,246
    Lv. Percent
    16.66%

    #35
    18. Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers her Superpower by Brittney Cooper
    19. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

    Just starting The Round House by Louise Erdrich
  6. "...now do Classical Gas"
    Matchbox's Avatar
    Matchbox is offline
    "...now do Classical Gas"
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,153
    Lv. Percent
    25.34%
    #36
    14: Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder. Sophie Amundsen is fourteen years old when she starts getting unusual letters - someone wants to give her a crash course in philosophy, from Socrates to Sartre and everything in between. The letters are interesting, so she goes along with it and becomes the student of a man named Alberto Knox. Weirdly, despite having her name in them and being friends with the man who sent them, it slowly becomes clear that the letters and the course may not really be meant for her. There’s another girl, Hilde, who Sophie and Alberto have never met, but her name keeps reappearing all over their lives...

    This is a surprisingly good grounding in philosophy, but my God does the plot around it get trippy.
    Last edited by Matchbox; 03-23-2018 at 07:01 PM.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  7. Regular Member
    Kitinboots's Avatar
    Kitinboots is offline
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    30
    Lv. Percent
    7.5%
    #37
    4. The Orphan's Tale by Pam Jenoff.
    5. Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline
    6. The Truth About Happily Ever After by Karole Cozzo
    7. The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden
    8. The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden
  8. "...now do Classical Gas"
    Matchbox's Avatar
    Matchbox is offline
    "...now do Classical Gas"
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,153
    Lv. Percent
    25.34%
    #38
    14: Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder. Sophie Amundsen is fourteen years old when she starts getting unusual letters - someone wants to give her a crash course in philosophy, from Socrates to Sartre and everything in between.

    15: Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. Just because someone wears a cape, a mask and his underwear on the outside of his trousers, it doesn’t necessarily make him heroic.

    16: Harry Potter y el Prisionero de Azkaban by J. K. Rowling. The process of introducing my kids to Hogwarts continues, and is going well.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  9. MilitarySOS Jewel
    lavender_jane's Avatar
    lavender_jane is offline
    MilitarySOS Jewel
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,246
    Lv. Percent
    16.66%

    #39
    Quote Originally Posted by lavender_jane View Post
    That's a wrap on January!

    Month One
    1. The Plague of Doves by Louise Erdrich
    2. The Power by Naomi Alderman
    3. Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
    4. Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
    5. The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead
    6. The Bees by Laline Paull
    7. Armada by Ernest Cline
    8. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, Jack Thorne
    Quote Originally Posted by lavender_jane View Post
    Month Two
    9. The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick
    10. Silver Sparrow by Tayari Jones
    11. The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin
    12. Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling
    13. This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America by Morgan Jerkins
    14. Hunger: A Memior of (My) Body by Roxane Gay
    Month Three
    15. Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman
    16. The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood
    17. Artemis by Andy Weir
    18. Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers her Superpower by Brittney Cooper
    19. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
    20. The Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn
  10. "...now do Classical Gas"
    Matchbox's Avatar
    Matchbox is offline
    "...now do Classical Gas"
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,153
    Lv. Percent
    25.34%
    #40
    14: Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder. Sophie Amundsen is fourteen years old when she starts getting unusual letters - someone wants to give her a crash course in philosophy, from Socrates to Sartre and everything in between.

    15: Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. Just because someone wears a cape, a mask and his underwear on the outside of his trousers, it doesn’t necessarily make him heroic.

    16: Harry Potter y el Prisionero de Azkaban by J. K. Rowling. The process of introducing my kids to Hogwarts continues, and is going well.

    17: Thursday's Child by Sonya Hartnett. Harper Flute lives on a poor farm with her Mam, her Da, her sister Audrey and her brother Devon. And her other brother Tin, "born on a Thursday and so fated to his wanderings", the little boy who vanished under the house one day, started digging and has never come back out. They know he's there. Mam keeps things she gets from Tin - stones, bottle tops, the clean bandages she left him that he refused to take, a lock of baby-fine hair - in a box. But they never see him.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •