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Thread: 52 Books in 52 weeks 2018!

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    #21
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    That's a wrap on January!

    Month One
    1. The Plague of Doves by Louise Erdrich
    2. The Power by Naomi Alderman
    3. Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
    4. Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
    5. The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead
    6. The Bees by Laline Paull
    7. Armada by Ernest Cline
    8. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, Jack Thorne
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    #22
    Month One
    1. Emma in the Night by Wendy Walker
    2. Silent Child by Sarah A. Denzil
    3. My Sister's Grave by Robert Dugoni
    4. The Surrogate by Louise Jensen
    5. Behind Closed Doors by BA Paris

    Month Two
    6. The Marriage Lie by Kimberly Belle
    7. Into the Water by Paula Hawkins

    I'm pretty proud that I'm one book ahead as January ends!
    Last edited by April Lynne; 02-02-2018 at 08:50 AM.



  3. "...now do Classical Gas"
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    #23
    1: It by Stephen King. If I didn’t have issues with clowns before...

    2: Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. A memoir of the author’s time flying remote mail routes for Aeropostale...including a middle-of-the-Sahara crash in 1935 which almost killed him. Wildly poetic and absolutely beautiful.

    3: The Leper of Saint Giles by Ellis Peters. The Benedictine abbey of Shrewsbury prepares to conduct a marriage between a young and beautiful heiress and a much older, cruel man. It becomes apparent very quickly that she’s being pushed into this wedding against her will; the one she REALLY wants is one of her new husband’s young squires. When the groom dies a violent death shortly before the wedding, this hothead boy is the prime suspect. Fifth of the Cadfael books.

    4: Iraq + 100: Stories From a Century After the Invasion edited by Hassan Blasim. A collection of short stories. Ask a group of Iraqi writers (some expats, some still living there) what they think Iraq might look like in 2103, exactly one hundred years after the Americans came...this is what you get.

    5: Das Reboot: How German Soccer Reinvented Itself and Conquered the World by Raphael Honigstein. Because there’s just not enough obsessing about football in my life. German football in the late 1990s-early 2000s was a stodgy, boring, uninspired mess. They hadn’t won a major tournament in years, just embarrassing failure after embarrassing failure. To change that, they had to start from the ground up - reworking youth squad selection and development, tactics, training facilities, everything. Start in Munich in 2004 with the words “we are not good enough”. End in 2014 at the Maracană, as the greatest in the world. They have my (grudging...it hurts to give, but I have to) respect for 2014 - that really was a masterclass.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
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    #24
    Month One
    1. Emma in the Night by Wendy Walker
    2. Silent Child by Sarah A. Denzil
    3. My Sister's Grave by Robert Dugoni
    4. The Surrogate by Louise Jensen
    5. Behind Closed Doors by BA Paris

    Month Two
    6. The Marriage Lie by Kimberly Belle
    7. Into the Water by Paula Hawkins
    8. The Wife by Alafair Burke



  5. "...now do Classical Gas"
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    #25
    1: It by Stephen King. If I didn’t have issues with clowns before...

    2: Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. A memoir of the author’s time flying remote mail routes for Aeropostale...including a middle-of-the-Sahara crash in 1935 which almost killed him. Wildly poetic and absolutely beautiful.

    3: The Leper of Saint Giles by Ellis Peters. The Benedictine abbey of Shrewsbury prepares to conduct a marriage between a young and beautiful heiress and a much older, cruel man. It becomes apparent very quickly that she’s being pushed into this wedding against her will; the one she REALLY wants is one of her new husband’s young squires. When the groom dies a violent death shortly before the wedding, this hothead boy is the prime suspect. Fifth of the Cadfael books.

    4: Iraq + 100: Stories From a Century After the Invasion edited by Hassan Blasim. A collection of short stories. Ask a group of Iraqi writers (some expats, some still living there) what they think Iraq might look like in 2103, exactly one hundred years after the Americans came...this is what you get.

    5: Das Reboot: How German Soccer Reinvented Itself and Conquered the World by Raphael Honigstein. Because there’s just not enough obsessing about football in my life.

    6: The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. LeGuin. She died recently, so it seemed appropriate. There is a man who dreams, and his dreams can change reality.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
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    #26
    Month One
    1. Emma in the Night by Wendy Walker
    2. Silent Child by Sarah A. Denzil
    3. My Sister's Grave by Robert Dugoni
    4. The Surrogate by Louise Jensen
    5. Behind Closed Doors by BA Paris

    Month Two
    6. The Marriage Lie by Kimberly Belle
    7. Into the Water by Paula Hawkins
    8. The Wife by Alafair Burke
    9. I See You by Claire Mackintosh



  7. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    #27
    Month Two
    9. The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick
    10. Silver Sparrow by Tayari Jones
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    #28
    11. The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin
  9. "...now do Classical Gas"
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    #29
    1: It by Stephen King. If I didn’t have issues with clowns before...

    2: Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. A memoir of the author’s time flying remote mail routes for Aeropostale...including a middle-of-the-Sahara crash in 1935 which almost killed him. Wildly poetic and absolutely beautiful.

    3: The Leper of Saint Giles by Ellis Peters. The Benedictine abbey of Shrewsbury prepares to conduct a marriage between a young and beautiful heiress and a much older, cruel man. It becomes apparent very quickly that she’s being pushed into this wedding against her will; the one she REALLY wants is one of her new husband’s young squires. When the groom dies a violent death shortly before the wedding, this hothead boy is the prime suspect. Fifth of the Cadfael books.

    4: Iraq + 100: Stories From a Century After the Invasion edited by Hassan Blasim. A collection of short stories. Ask a group of Iraqi writers (some expats, some still living there) what they think Iraq might look like in 2103, exactly one hundred years after the Americans came...this is what you get.

    5: Das Reboot: How German Soccer Reinvented Itself and Conquered the World by Raphael Honigstein. Because there’s just not enough obsessing about football in my life.

    6: The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. LeGuin. She died recently, so it seemed appropriate. There is a man who dreams, and his dreams can change reality.

    7: The Yiddish Policeman’s Union by Michael Chabon. The Sitka District has existed for sixty years, as a “temporary” safe haven for Jews after the revelations of the Holocaust and the bloody stillbirth of Israel in 1948. Now, time is running out for the Sitka Jews, as Sitka was never made permanent and is due to return to Alaskan control. The coming Reversion is giving Meyer Landsman more problems than he likes; not only is he a homicide detective whose jurisdiction won’t exist three months from now, but there’s been a very weird murder. A heroin addict using a name that can’t possibly be real, who ties off his arm with tefillin, and who the more strictly devout of Sitka seem to think might even have been Tzaddik Ha-Dor - the Righteous Man, the Messiah who can rebuild Jerusalem’s Temple. These are strange, strange times to be a Jew... I loved this book. It’s fabulously detailed alternate history, and the whole thing has beautifully elaborately surreal turns of phrase.

    Rabbi Heskel Shpilman is a deformed mountain, a giant ruined desert, a cartoon house with the windows shut and the sink left running. A little kid lumped him together, a mob of kids, blind orphans who never laid eyes on a man. They clumped the dough of his arms and legs to the dough of his body, then jammed his head on top. A millionaire could cover a Rolls-Royce with the fine black silk-and velvet expanse of the Rebbe’s frock coat. It would require the brain strength of the eighteen greatest sages in history to reason through the arguments against and in favour of classifying the Rebbe’s massive bottom as either a creature of the deep, a man-made structure or an unavoidable act of God.
    8: Harry Potter y la Piedra Filosofal by J. K. Rowling. I’ve been reading this with my kids. Yes, it’s in Spanish. I don’t own it in English. No, points will not be awarded for guessing which book this is when it’s at home
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  10. "...now do Classical Gas"
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    #30
    1: It by Stephen King. If I didn’t have issues with clowns before...

    2: Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. A memoir of the author’s time flying remote mail routes for Aeropostale...including a middle-of-the-Sahara crash in 1935 which almost killed him. Wildly poetic and absolutely beautiful.

    3: The Leper of Saint Giles by Ellis Peters. The Benedictine abbey of Shrewsbury prepares to conduct a marriage between a young and beautiful heiress and a much older, cruel man. It becomes apparent very quickly that she’s being pushed into this wedding against her will; the one she REALLY wants is one of her new husband’s young squires. When the groom dies a violent death shortly before the wedding, this hothead boy is the prime suspect. Fifth of the Cadfael books.

    4: Iraq + 100: Stories From a Century After the Invasion edited by Hassan Blasim. A collection of short stories. Ask a group of Iraqi writers (some expats, some still living there) what they think Iraq might look like in 2103, exactly one hundred years after the Americans came...this is what you get.

    5: Das Reboot: How German Soccer Reinvented Itself and Conquered the World by Raphael Honigstein. Because there’s just not enough obsessing about football in my life.

    6: The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. LeGuin. She died recently, so it seemed appropriate. There is a man who dreams, and his dreams can change reality.

    7: The Yiddish Policeman’s Union by Michael Chabon. The Sitka District has existed for sixty years, as a “temporary” safe haven for Jews after the revelations of the Holocaust and the bloody stillbirth of Israel in 1948. Now, time is running out for the Sitka Jews, as Sitka was never made permanent and is due to return to Alaskan control. The coming Reversion is giving Meyer Landsman more problems than he likes; not only is he a homicide detective whose jurisdiction won’t exist three months from now, but there’s been a very weird murder. A heroin addict using a name that can’t possibly be real, who ties off his arm with tefillin, and who the more strictly devout of Sitka seem to think might even have been Tzaddik Ha-Dor - the Righteous Man, the Messiah who can rebuild Jerusalem’s Temple. These are strange, strange times to be a Jew...

    8: Harry Potter y la Piedra Filosofal by J. K. Rowling. I’ve been reading this with my kids. Yes, it’s in Spanish. I don’t own it in English. No, points will not be awarded for guessing which book this is when it’s at home

    9: The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create The World’s Great Drinks by Amy Stewart. Exactly what it says on the tin, a wander through everything from the agave that ferments into tequila to the cinchona bark that flavours a gin and tonic (it’s in the tonic water) to the saffron infusion in Benedictine.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
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