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Thread: 52 Books in 52 weeks 2018!

  1. "...now do Classical Gas"
    Matchbox's Avatar
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    #91
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    53: If This Is A Man by Primo Levi. An Italian chemist, sent to Auschwitz by the Nazis, begins his descent into hell.

    54: The Truce by Primo Levi. Having fallen into hell, the Italian chemist slowly climbs back out of it. I love The Truce - both this and its predecessor are beautifully written, and you need to read both to see the whole narrative play out, but If This Is A Man is almost soul-destroying, and The Truce is...almost distilled joy. Chapter by chapter, as he gets closer and closer to being able to go home to Turin, you get to watch a man rediscover that he’s not dead yet, and that his life is worth having.

    55: Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. The prophecy makes it very clear that the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Sometime just after tea. Unfortunately...well, look, they may be an angel and a demon, but Aziraphale and Crowley have had several thousand years to get used to each other, they had plans for Sunday, and frankly they’re just not ready for Armageddon yet! This is great fun, and I’d quite like to own Crowley’s car.

    56: Switch Bitch by Roald Dahl. A book of short stories. I've had to hide this one from my kids - they assume that anything that says ROALD DAHL in big letters across the front cover must be a children's book, meant for them. This is...not. Very not.

    57: 30 Days of Night by Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith. A small town in Alaska sits so far north that when winter comes the sun doesn't rise for thirty days. This makes it the perfect hunting ground for vampires...

    58: The Raven in the Foregate by Ellis Peters. Father Ailnoth is the new parish priest in the district, but he's not a very personable one. In his first week, he upsets literally every person he interacts with in Shrewsbury, sometimes very badly - refusing to baptise a dying baby and then refusing to bury it because it wasn't baptised, hitting the children with his stick, accusing the baker of cheating him. Then he disappears. Twelfth of the Cadfael books.

    59: Playing Beatie Bow by Ruth Park. I’ve been reading this with my kids. Abigail Kirk is fourteen, and an awkward fourteen at that. The children in her area of Sydney play a game called “Beatie Bow”, but the little girl she babysits is too frightened to play. There’s another little girl who just watches as well; this girl is very thin, she never talks to anyone, she wears an old fashioned dress with short cropped hair. When Abigail follows her, she realises that this little girl IS Beatie - Beatrice May Bow, who is nine years old in 1873...

    60: The Tasmanian Babes Fiasco by John Birmingham. There’s a sharehouse on York Street. The various inhabitants are, in accordance with the prophecy, broke and desperate, so (against their better natures, and despite the Celine Dion albums and hordes of stuffed animals...) they take on a new flatmate. He soon disappears with half their stuff and all of the rent. They have one week to sober up, find two thousand dollars and catch up with him before it all gets just a little out of hand.

    61: Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco. Every publishing company gets a few crackpot conspiracy manuscripts, and three men in this particular vanity press decide to take advantage of their stable of credible idiots by creating the Ultimate Conspiracy Theory - they call this The Plan, and it’s going to have the Templars, and the Rosicrucians, and Judaism, and Caribbean voodoo, and immortality, and the Holy Grail, and quite literally everything they can think of to throw into it that isn’t the kitchen sink. The Plan begins to get out of hand, not least because despite knowing that they’ve made it all up it seems that someone might be taking the whole thing seriously after all...

    62: The Carpet People by Terry Pratchett. Exactly what it says on the tin - a race of tiny people, living in the tufts of your carpet. This one was for my middle son, who’s really charmed by it.

    63: The Rose Rent by Ellis Peters. The young widow Judith Perle lost her husband and her child within a few days of each other. Unable to stand the thought of staying in a house where she’d once been so happy but had lost everything, she gives the house to Shrewsbury Abbey, and in return asks for a very small, unique rent - one white rose, every year, from the bush in the house’s garden. If the rose rent ever fails to be put in her hands on the right day, the agreement ends, and the house must be returned. In the year 1142, someone really doesn’t want that rent paid, and is willing to try arson, kidnapping or even murder to prevent it. Thirteenth of the Cadfael books.

    64: The Hunt For Red October by Tom Clancy. The marvellous adventures of a runaway Russian submarine. If I put it like that, it sounds like a children's book ....
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  2. "...now do Classical Gas"
    Matchbox's Avatar
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    "...now do Classical Gas"
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    #92
    53: If This Is A Man by Primo Levi. An Italian chemist, sent to Auschwitz by the Nazis, begins his descent into hell.

    54: The Truce by Primo Levi. Having fallen into hell, the Italian chemist slowly climbs back out of it. I love The Truce - both this and its predecessor are beautifully written, and you need to read both to see the whole narrative play out, but If This Is A Man is almost soul-destroying, and The Truce is...almost distilled joy. Chapter by chapter, as he gets closer and closer to being able to go home to Turin, you get to watch a man rediscover that he’s not dead yet, and that his life is worth having.

    55: Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. The prophecy makes it very clear that the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Sometime just after tea. Unfortunately...well, look, they may be an angel and a demon, but Aziraphale and Crowley have had several thousand years to get used to each other, they had plans for Sunday, and frankly they’re just not ready for Armageddon yet! This is great fun, and I’d quite like to own Crowley’s car.

    56: Switch Bitch by Roald Dahl. A book of short stories. I've had to hide this one from my kids - they assume that anything that says ROALD DAHL in big letters across the front cover must be a children's book, meant for them. This is...not. Very not.

    57: 30 Days of Night by Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith. A small town in Alaska sits so far north that when winter comes the sun doesn't rise for thirty days. This makes it the perfect hunting ground for vampires...

    58: The Raven in the Foregate by Ellis Peters. Father Ailnoth is the new parish priest in the district, but he's not a very personable one. In his first week, he upsets literally every person he interacts with in Shrewsbury, sometimes very badly - refusing to baptise a dying baby and then refusing to bury it because it wasn't baptised, hitting the children with his stick, accusing the baker of cheating him. Then he disappears. Twelfth of the Cadfael books.

    59: Playing Beatie Bow by Ruth Park. I’ve been reading this with my kids. Abigail Kirk is fourteen, and an awkward fourteen at that. The children in her area of Sydney play a game called “Beatie Bow”, but the little girl she babysits is too frightened to play. There’s another little girl who just watches as well; this girl is very thin, she never talks to anyone, she wears an old fashioned dress with short cropped hair. When Abigail follows her, she realises that this little girl IS Beatie - Beatrice May Bow, who is nine years old in 1873...

    60: The Tasmanian Babes Fiasco by John Birmingham. There’s a sharehouse on York Street. The various inhabitants are, in accordance with the prophecy, broke and desperate, so (against their better natures, and despite the Celine Dion albums and hordes of stuffed animals...) they take on a new flatmate. He soon disappears with half their stuff and all of the rent. They have one week to sober up, find two thousand dollars and catch up with him before it all gets just a little out of hand.

    61: Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco. Every publishing company gets a few crackpot conspiracy manuscripts, and three men in this particular vanity press decide to take advantage of their stable of credible idiots by creating the Ultimate Conspiracy Theory - they call this The Plan, and it’s going to have the Templars, and the Rosicrucians, and Judaism, and Caribbean voodoo, and immortality, and the Holy Grail, and quite literally everything they can think of to throw into it that isn’t the kitchen sink. The Plan begins to get out of hand, not least because despite knowing that they’ve made it all up it seems that someone might be taking the whole thing seriously after all...

    62: The Carpet People by Terry Pratchett. Exactly what it says on the tin - a race of tiny people, living in the tufts of your carpet. This one was for my middle son, who’s really charmed by it.

    63: The Rose Rent by Ellis Peters. The young widow Judith Perle lost her husband and her child within a few days of each other. Unable to stand the thought of staying in a house where she’d once been so happy but had lost everything, she gives the house to Shrewsbury Abbey, and in return asks for a very small, unique rent - one white rose, every year, from the bush in the house’s garden. If the rose rent ever fails to be put in her hands on the right day, the agreement ends, and the house must be returned. In the year 1142, someone really doesn’t want that rent paid, and is willing to try arson, kidnapping or even murder to prevent it. Thirteenth of the Cadfael books.

    64: The Hunt For Red October by Tom Clancy. The marvellous adventures of a runaway Russian submarine. If I put it like that, it sounds like a children's book ....

    65: Storm Boy by Colin Thiele. A boy, a pelican and the coast of South Australia.

    66: A Fabulous Kingdom: The Exploration of the Arctic by Charles Officer and Jake Page. Exactly what it says on the tin - a history of all the various attempts to first find and then map the North Pole. Normally I’m more interested in the Antarctic than the Arctic, but I enjoyed this.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
  3. MilitarySOS Jewel
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    #93
    Month Eleven
    51. Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty
    52. Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

    Month Twelve
    53. Circe by Madeline Miller

    Currently reading Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.
  4. "...now do Classical Gas"
    Matchbox's Avatar
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    "...now do Classical Gas"
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    #94
    53: If This Is A Man by Primo Levi. An Italian chemist, sent to Auschwitz by the Nazis, begins his descent into hell.

    54: The Truce by Primo Levi. Having fallen into hell, the Italian chemist slowly climbs back out of it. I love The Truce - both this and its predecessor are beautifully written, and you need to read both to see the whole narrative play out, but If This Is A Man is almost soul-destroying, and The Truce is...almost distilled joy. Chapter by chapter, as he gets closer and closer to being able to go home to Turin, you get to watch a man rediscover that he’s not dead yet, and that his life is worth having.

    55: Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. The prophecy makes it very clear that the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Sometime just after tea. Unfortunately...well, look, they may be an angel and a demon, but Aziraphale and Crowley have had several thousand years to get used to each other, they had plans for Sunday, and frankly they’re just not ready for Armageddon yet! This is great fun, and I’d quite like to own Crowley’s car.

    56: Switch Bitch by Roald Dahl. A book of short stories. I've had to hide this one from my kids - they assume that anything that says ROALD DAHL in big letters across the front cover must be a children's book, meant for them. This is...not. Very not.

    57: 30 Days of Night by Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith. A small town in Alaska sits so far north that when winter comes the sun doesn't rise for thirty days. This makes it the perfect hunting ground for vampires...

    58: The Raven in the Foregate by Ellis Peters. Father Ailnoth is the new parish priest in the district, but he's not a very personable one. In his first week, he upsets literally every person he interacts with in Shrewsbury, sometimes very badly - refusing to baptise a dying baby and then refusing to bury it because it wasn't baptised, hitting the children with his stick, accusing the baker of cheating him. Then he disappears. Twelfth of the Cadfael books.

    59: Playing Beatie Bow by Ruth Park. I’ve been reading this with my kids. Abigail Kirk is fourteen, and an awkward fourteen at that. The children in her area of Sydney play a game called “Beatie Bow”, but the little girl she babysits is too frightened to play. There’s another little girl who just watches as well; this girl is very thin, she never talks to anyone, she wears an old fashioned dress with short cropped hair. When Abigail follows her, she realises that this little girl IS Beatie - Beatrice May Bow, who is nine years old in 1873...

    60: The Tasmanian Babes Fiasco by John Birmingham. There’s a sharehouse on York Street. The various inhabitants are, in accordance with the prophecy, broke and desperate, so (against their better natures, and despite the Celine Dion albums and hordes of stuffed animals...) they take on a new flatmate. He soon disappears with half their stuff and all of the rent. They have one week to sober up, find two thousand dollars and catch up with him before it all gets just a little out of hand.

    61: Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco. Every publishing company gets a few crackpot conspiracy manuscripts, and three men in this particular vanity press decide to take advantage of their stable of credible idiots by creating the Ultimate Conspiracy Theory - they call this The Plan, and it’s going to have the Templars, and the Rosicrucians, and Judaism, and Caribbean voodoo, and immortality, and the Holy Grail, and quite literally everything they can think of to throw into it that isn’t the kitchen sink. The Plan begins to get out of hand, not least because despite knowing that they’ve made it all up it seems that someone might be taking the whole thing seriously after all...

    62: The Carpet People by Terry Pratchett. Exactly what it says on the tin - a race of tiny people, living in the tufts of your carpet. This one was for my middle son, who’s really charmed by it.

    63: The Rose Rent by Ellis Peters. The young widow Judith Perle lost her husband and her child within a few days of each other. Unable to stand the thought of staying in a house where she’d once been so happy but had lost everything, she gives the house to Shrewsbury Abbey, and in return asks for a very small, unique rent - one white rose, every year, from the bush in the house’s garden. If the rose rent ever fails to be put in her hands on the right day, the agreement ends, and the house must be returned. In the year 1142, someone really doesn’t want that rent paid, and is willing to try arson, kidnapping or even murder to prevent it. Thirteenth of the Cadfael books.

    64: The Hunt For Red October by Tom Clancy. The marvellous adventures of a runaway Russian submarine. If I put it like that, it sounds like a children's book ....

    65: Storm Boy by Colin Thiele. A boy, a pelican and the coast of South Australia.

    66: A Fabulous Kingdom: The Exploration of the Arctic by Charles Officer and Jake Page. Exactly what it says on the tin - a history of all the various attempts to first find and then map the North Pole. Normally I’m more interested in the Antarctic than the Arctic, but I enjoyed this.

    67: The Hermit of Eyton Forest by Ellis Peters. A ten year old boy, Richard Ludel, inherits a massive tract of land. There’s something of a custody dispute between Shrewsbury Abbey, where his father left him to be educated, and a grandmother Richard barely knows. Then Richard disappears. Fourteenth of the Cadfael books.

    68: Three Stories by J. M. Coetzee. Exactly what it says on the tin.



    Quote Originally Posted by lavender_jane View Post
    Month Eleven
    51. Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty
    52. Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

    Month Twelve
    53. Circe by Madeline Miller

    Currently reading Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.
    Are you like me, and weirdly attracted to Crowley’s car? I WANT that Bentley.
    If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell
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