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Thread: 52 books in 52 weeks: 2017 edition

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    #91
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    21. Human Acts by Han Kang
    22. Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach
    23. One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories by B.J. Novak
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    #92
    I am re-reading “Arch of Triumph” of Erich Maria Remarque. One of my favorite writers!
    Last edited by Jason102; 08-31-2017 at 04:10 AM.
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    #93
    53: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque. A little soldier and a clear voice, in the trenches of France.

    54: Como Agua Para Chocolate (Like Water For Chocolate) by Laura Esquivel. A young couple are desperately in love but can't be together, as family tradition dictates that the youngest daughter never marries and instead cares for the family until she dies. He marries her older sister, though he still loves her dearly, and she channels all of her frustrated love, lust and hopes into food.

    55: The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay. For my kids, the adventures of a gentleman koala named Bunyip Bluegum, the disreputable old seaman Bill Barnacle, Sam Sawnoff (the penguin bold!)...and a really remarkable, sentient, never-ending pudding that prefers to be called Albert. It makes more sense than the explanation makes it seem.

    56: The Testament of Mary by Colm Toibžn. Mary has always loved her son. But since his death, she really REALLY wishes his friends would stop trying to make the beautiful, thoughtful boy she lost seem like a god.

    57: El Espiritu de mis Padres Sigue Subiendo en la Lluvia (My Fathers' Ghost is Climbing in the Rain) by Patricio Pron. I...don't think I was the right person for this book. I'm not sorry I read it, but I can't do it again.
    Accensum qui pedicat urit mentulam.
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    #94
    48. VJ: The Unplugged Adventures of MTV's First Wave by Nina Blackwood (With), Mark Goodman, Alan Hunter, Martha Quinn, Gavin Edwards
    49. Nowhere but Home by Liza Palmer
    50. Key Lime Pie by Josi Kilpack
    51. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
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    #95
    What did you think of The Book Thief, Daisy? Did you like it?

    53: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque. A little soldier and a clear voice, in the trenches of France.

    54: Como Agua Para Chocolate (Like Water For Chocolate) by Laura Esquivel. A young couple are desperately in love but can't be together, as family tradition dictates that the youngest daughter never marries and instead cares for the family until she dies. He marries her older sister, though he still loves her dearly, and she channels all of her frustrated love, lust and hopes into food.

    55: The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay. For my kids, the adventures of a gentleman koala named Bunyip Bluegum, the disreputable old seaman Bill Barnacle, Sam Sawnoff (the penguin bold!)...and a really remarkable, sentient, never-ending pudding that prefers to be called Albert. It makes more sense than the explanation makes it seem.

    56: The Testament of Mary by Colm Toibžn. Mary has always loved her son. But since his death, she really REALLY wishes his friends would stop trying to make the beautiful, thoughtful boy she lost seem like a god.

    57: El Espiritu de mis Padres Sigue Subiendo en la Lluvia (My Fathers' Ghost is Climbing in the Rain) by Patricio Pron. I...don't think I was the right person for this book. I'm not sorry I read it, but I can't do it again.

    58: Apicius, as translated by Sally Grainger and Christopher Grocock. Essentially a fourth century Roman cookbook. A real one. I've been seriously considering cooking from it more often. The only recipe I use with any frequency is the peppered honey cakes, and that only because my kids go mad for them...

    59: Bite Me! by Dylan Meconis. A comic about vampires, revolution, chickens and uncontrolled shenanigans. Anne Rice must hate this.
    Accensum qui pedicat urit mentulam.
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    #96
    24. The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling)
    25. Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood
    26. The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith
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    #97
    I'm super late to the party (and moving at a snail's pace) but oh well

    1. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by JK Rowling
    2. The Princess Diarest by Carrie Fisher
    3. It by Stephen King (currently reading and almost halfway finished)




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    #98
    Quote Originally Posted by idratherbehiking View Post
    I'm super late to the party (and moving at a snail's pace) but oh well

    1. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by JK Rowling
    2. The Princess Diarest by Carrie Fisher
    3. It by Stephen King (currently reading and almost halfway finished)
    Eh, the more the merrier.

    IT is a great book, with the possible exception of one part. You'll know it when you get there. What in the WORLD, Stephen King?!



    53: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque. A little soldier and a clear voice, in the trenches of France.

    54: Como Agua Para Chocolate (Like Water For Chocolate) by Laura Esquivel. A young couple are desperately in love but can't be together, as family tradition dictates that the youngest daughter never marries and instead cares for the family until she dies. He marries her older sister, though he still loves her dearly, and she channels all of her frustrated love, lust and hopes into food.

    55: The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay. For my kids, the adventures of a gentleman koala named Bunyip Bluegum, the disreputable old seaman Bill Barnacle, Sam Sawnoff (the penguin bold!)...and a really remarkable, sentient, never-ending pudding that prefers to be called Albert. It makes more sense than the explanation makes it seem.

    56: The Testament of Mary by Colm Toibžn. Mary has always loved her son. But since his death, she really REALLY wishes his friends would stop trying to make the beautiful, thoughtful boy she lost seem like a god.

    57: El Espiritu de mis Padres Sigue Subiendo en la Lluvia (My Fathers' Ghost is Climbing in the Rain) by Patricio Pron. I...don't think I was the right person for this book. I'm not sorry I read it, but I can't do it again.

    58: Apicius, as translated by Sally Grainger and Christopher Grocock. Essentially a fourth century Roman cookbook. A real one. I've been seriously considering cooking from it more often. The only recipe I use with any frequency is the peppered honey cakes, and that only because my kids go mad for them...

    59: Bite Me! by Dylan Meconis. A comic about vampires, revolution, chickens and uncontrolled shenanigans. Anne Rice must hate this.

    60: Kabu Kabu by Nnedi Okorafor. A book of short stories. I loved this; the whole point of speculative fiction is to explore things that the reader otherwise wouldn't see, and these excel at that.

    61: Martin Fierro by Jose Hernandez. If you grow up where I grew up, this is one of the stories you're exposed to again and again. Shamefully, I'd never actually read the whole thing until now!

    62: The Freedom of the City by Brian Friel. After a protest turns violent, three people accidentally find themselves in the mayor's parlour of the Londonderry Guildhall. Unfortunately for them, Northern Ireland in the 1970s is not a peaceful place in general, and the authorities have interpreted them blundering in by mistake as a deliberately politicised occupation...
    Accensum qui pedicat urit mentulam.
  9. Plays with knives
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    #99
    53: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque. A little soldier and a clear voice, in the trenches of France.

    54: Como Agua Para Chocolate (Like Water For Chocolate) by Laura Esquivel. A young couple are desperately in love but can't be together, as family tradition dictates that the youngest daughter never marries and instead cares for the family until she dies. He marries her older sister, though he still loves her dearly, and she channels all of her frustrated love, lust and hopes into food.

    55: The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay. For my kids, the adventures of a gentleman koala named Bunyip Bluegum, the disreputable old seaman Bill Barnacle, Sam Sawnoff (the penguin bold!)...and a really remarkable, sentient, never-ending pudding that prefers to be called Albert. It makes more sense than the explanation makes it seem.

    56: The Testament of Mary by Colm Toibžn. Mary has always loved her son. But since his death, she really REALLY wishes his friends would stop trying to make the beautiful, thoughtful boy she lost seem like a god.

    57: El Espiritu de mis Padres Sigue Subiendo en la Lluvia (My Fathers' Ghost is Climbing in the Rain) by Patricio Pron. I...don't think I was the right person for this book. I'm not sorry I read it, but I can't do it again.

    58: Apicius, as translated by Sally Grainger and Christopher Grocock. Essentially a fourth century Roman cookbook. A real one. I've been seriously considering cooking from it more often. The only recipe I use with any frequency is the peppered honey cakes, and that only because my kids go mad for them...

    59: Bite Me! by Dylan Meconis. A comic about vampires, revolution, chickens and uncontrolled shenanigans. Anne Rice must hate this.

    60: Kabu Kabu by Nnedi Okorafor. A book of short stories. I loved this; the whole point of speculative fiction is to explore things that the reader otherwise wouldn't see, and these excel at that.

    61: Martin Fierro by Jose Hernandez. If you grow up where I grew up, this is one of the stories you're exposed to again and again. Shamefully, I'd never actually read the whole thing until now!

    62: The Freedom of the City by Brian Friel. After a protest turns violent, three people accidentally find themselves in the mayor's parlour of the Londonderry Guildhall. Unfortunately for them, Northern Ireland in the 1970s is not a peaceful place in general, and the authorities have interpreted them blundering in by mistake as a deliberately politicised occupation...

    63: Saint Peterís Fair by Ellis Peters. Summer 1139, and town and abbey both are building up the annual wool fair - a lot of visitors, and a LOT of money. Itís all going well until one of the visiting merchants turns up naked and stabbed in the Severn. Fourth of the Cadfael books.

    64: La Invencion de Morel (Morelís Invention) by Adolfo Bioy Cesares. The best way I can find to describe this is to say that itís Lost in book form. Thereís an island, and a group of people who really donít understand much about whatís going on, and weird machines, and on the whole itís very trippy!

    65: Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. A brief interlude with pirates and buried treasure, to please my kids.

    66: Captain Corelliís Mandolin by Louis de Bernieres. The Greeks, the Italians and the war, as a love story. I LOVED this book.
    Accensum qui pedicat urit mentulam.
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    Oop, double post!
    Accensum qui pedicat urit mentulam.
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